Publications by authors named "Joshua Trueheart"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rhodoxanthin synthase from honeysuckle; a membrane diiron enzyme catalyzes the multistep conversation of β-carotene to rhodoxanthin.

Sci Adv 2020 Apr 22;6(17):eaay9226. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

DSM Nutritional Products, 60 Westview St, Lexington, MA 02421, USA.

Rhodoxanthin is a vibrant red carotenoid found across the plant kingdom and in certain birds and fish. It is a member of the atypical retro class of carotenoids, which contain an additional double bond and a concerted shift of the conjugated double bonds relative to the more widely occurring carotenoid pigments, and whose biosynthetic origins have long remained elusive. Here, we identify LHRS ( hydroxylase rhodoxanthin synthase), a variant β-carotene hydroxylase (BCH)-type integral membrane diiron enzyme that mediates the conversion of β-carotene into rhodoxanthin. We identify residues that are critical to rhodoxanthin formation by LHRS. Substitution of only three residues converts a typical BCH into a multifunctional enzyme that mediates a multistep pathway from β-carotene to rhodoxanthin via a series of distinct oxidation steps in which the product of each step becomes the substrate for the next catalytic cycle. We propose a biosynthetic pathway from β-carotene to rhodoxanthin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aay9226DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7176425PMC
April 2020

Versatile genetic assembly system (VEGAS) to assemble pathways for expression in S. cerevisiae.

Nucleic Acids Res 2015 Jul 8;43(13):6620-30. Epub 2015 May 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA High Throughput Biology Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

We have developed a method for assembling genetic pathways for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our pathway assembly method, called VEGAS (Versatile genetic assembly system), exploits the native capacity of S. cerevisiae to perform homologous recombination and efficiently join sequences with terminal homology. In the VEGAS workflow, terminal homology between adjacent pathway genes and the assembly vector is encoded by 'VEGAS adapter' (VA) sequences, which are orthogonal in sequence with respect to the yeast genome. Prior to pathway assembly by VEGAS in S. cerevisiae, each gene is assigned an appropriate pair of VAs and assembled using a previously described technique called yeast Golden Gate (yGG). Here we describe the application of yGG specifically to building transcription units for VEGAS assembly as well as the VEGAS methodology. We demonstrate the assembly of four-, five- and six-gene pathways by VEGAS to generate S. cerevisiae cells synthesizing β-carotene and violacein. Moreover, we demonstrate the capacity of yGG coupled to VEGAS for combinatorial assembly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkv466DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513848PMC
July 2015

An internal deletion in MTH1 enables growth on glucose of pyruvate-decarboxylase negative, non-fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Microb Cell Fact 2012 Sep 15;11:131. Epub 2012 Sep 15.

Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, The Netherlands.

Background: Pyruvate-decarboxylase negative (Pdc⁻) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combine the robustness and high glycolytic capacity of this yeast with the absence of alcoholic fermentation. This makes Pdc⁻S. cerevisiae an interesting platform for efficient conversion of glucose towards pyruvate-derived products without formation of ethanol as a by-product. However, Pdc⁻ strains cannot grow on high glucose concentrations and require C₂-compounds (ethanol or acetate) for growth under conditions with low glucose concentrations, which hitherto has limited application in industry.

Results: Genetic analysis of a Pdc⁻ strain previously evolved to overcome these deficiencies revealed a 225 p in-frame internal deletion in MTH1, encoding a transcriptional regulator involved in glucose sensing. This internal deletion contains a phosphorylation site required for degradation, thereby hypothetically resulting in increased stability of the protein. Reverse engineering of this alternative MTH1 allele into a non-evolved Pdc⁻ strain enabled growth on 20 g l⁻¹ glucose and 0.3% (v/v) ethanol at a maximum specific growth rate (0.24 h⁻¹) similar to that of the evolved Pdc⁻ strain (0.23 h⁻¹). Furthermore, the reverse engineered Pdc⁻ strain grew on glucose as sole carbon source, albeit at a lower specific growth rate (0.10 h⁻¹) than the evolved strain (0.20 h⁻¹). The observation that overexpression of the wild-type MTH1 allele also restored growth of Pdc⁻S. cerevisiae on glucose is consistent with the hypothesis that the internal deletion results in decreased degradation of Mth1. Reduced degradation of Mth1 has been shown to result in deregulation of hexose transport. In Pdc⁻ strains, reduced glucose uptake may prevent intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and/or redox problems, while release of glucose repression due to the MTH1 internal deletion may contribute to alleviation of the C₂-compound auxotrophy.

Conclusions: In this study we have discovered and characterised a mutation in MTH1 enabling Pdc⁻ strains to grow on glucose as the sole carbon source. This successful example of reverse engineering not only increases the understanding of the glucose tolerance of evolved Pdc⁻ S. cerevisiae, but also allows introduction of this portable genetic element into various industrial yeast strains, thereby simplifying metabolic engineering strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2859-11-131DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3503853PMC
September 2012

Integrating transcriptional and metabolite profiles to direct the engineering of lovastatin-producing fungal strains.

Nat Biotechnol 2003 Feb 21;21(2):150-6. Epub 2003 Jan 21.

Microbia, Inc., 320 Bent Street, Cambridge, MA 02141, USA.

We describe a method to decipher the complex inter-relationships between metabolite production trends and gene expression events, and show how information gleaned from such studies can be applied to yield improved production strains. Genomic fragment microarrays were constructed for the Aspergillus terreus genome, and transcriptional profiles were generated from strains engineered to produce varying amounts of the medically significant natural product lovastatin. Metabolite detection methods were employed to quantify the polyketide-derived secondary metabolites lovastatin and (+)-geodin in broths from fermentations of the same strains. Association analysis of the resulting transcriptional and metabolic data sets provides mechanistic insight into the genetic and physiological control of lovastatin and (+)-geodin biosynthesis, and identifies novel components involved in the production of (+)-geodin, as well as other secondary metabolites. Furthermore, this analysis identifies specific tools, including promoters for reporter-based selection systems, that we employed to improve lovastatin production by A. terreus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt781DOI Listing
February 2003