Publications by authors named "Joshua Kriegel"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Is Latency in Symptom Onset Explained by Tau Propagation?

Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 2018 02 1;8(2). Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Alzheimer's Disease and CTE Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy associated with repetitive mild brain trauma. CTE, previously termed "dementia pugilistica," has been identified in American football, ice hockey, baseball, rugby and soccer players, boxers, wrestlers, and military personnel exposed to blast and other traumatic brain injuries. There is often a long latency period between an individual's exposure to repetitive brain trauma and the clinical symptoms of CTE. The pathology of CTE is characterized by a progression from isolated focal perivascular hyperphosphorylated tau lesions in the cerebral cortex to a widespread tauopathy that involves diffuse cortical and medial temporal lobe regions. We hypothesize that the spread of tau from focal perivascular lesions to a widespread tauopathy occurs as a result of intraneuronal and intrasynaptic prion-like protein templating, as well as tau secretion and propagation along glymphatic and cerebrospinal fluid pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/cshperspect.a024059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5793739PMC
February 2018

Two novel loci, COBL and SLC10A2, for Alzheimer's disease in African Americans.

Alzheimers Dement 2017 02 20;13(2):119-129. Epub 2016 Oct 20.

Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Alzheimer's Disease and CTE Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Medicine (Biomedical Genetics), Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: African Americans' (AAs) late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) genetic risk profile is incompletely understood. Including clinical covariates in genetic analyses using informed conditioning might improve study power.

Methods: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in AAs employing informed conditioning in 1825 LOAD cases and 3784 cognitively normal controls. We derived a posterior liability conditioned on age, sex, diabetes status, current smoking status, educational attainment, and affection status, with parameters informed by external prevalence information. We assessed association between the posterior liability and a genome-wide set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), controlling for APOE and ABCA7, identified previously in a LOAD GWAS of AAs.

Results: Two SNPs at novel loci, rs112404845 (P = 3.8 × 10), upstream of COBL, and rs16961023 (P = 4.6 × 10), downstream of SLC10A2, obtained genome-wide significant evidence of association with the posterior liability.

Discussion: An informed conditioning approach can detect LOAD genetic associations in AAs not identified by traditional GWAS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2016.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5318231PMC
February 2017

Assessing clinicopathological correlation in chronic traumatic encephalopathy: rationale and methods for the UNITE study.

Alzheimers Res Ther 2015 Oct 12;7(1):62. Epub 2015 Oct 12.

Alzheimer's Disease Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, B-7800, Boston, MA, 02118, USA.

Introduction: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegeneration associated with repetitive head impacts. Understanding Neurologic Injury and Traumatic Encephalopathy (UNITE) is a U01 project recently funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. The goal of the UNITE project is to examine the neuropathology and clinical presentation of brain donors designated as "at risk" for the development of CTE based on prior athletic or military exposure. Here, we present the rationale and methodology for UNITE.

Methods: Over the course of 4 years, we will analyze the brains and spinal cords of 300 deceased subjects who had a history of repetitive head impacts sustained during participation in contact sports at the professional or collegiate level or during military service. Clinical data are collected through medical record review and retrospective structured and unstructured family interviews conducted by a behavioral neurologist or neuropsychologist. Blinded to the clinical data, a neuropathologist conducts a comprehensive assessment for neurodegenerative disease, including CTE, using published criteria. At a clinicopathological conference, a panel of physicians and neuropsychologists, blinded to the neuropathological data, reaches a clinical consensus diagnosis using published criteria, including proposed clinical research criteria for CTE.

Results: We will investigate the validity of these clinical criteria and sources of error by using recently validated neuropathological criteria as a gold standard for CTE diagnosis. We also will use statistical modeling to identify diagnostic features that best predict CTE pathology.

Conclusions: The UNITE study is a novel and methodologically rigorous means of assessing clinicopathological correlation in CTE. Our findings will be critical for developing future iterations of CTE clinical diagnostic criteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13195-015-0148-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4601147PMC
October 2015