Publications by authors named "Joshua Kistler"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Regular Caffeine Intake Delays REM Sleep Promotion and Attenuates Sleep Quality in Healthy Men.

J Biol Rhythms 2021 May 23:7487304211013995. Epub 2021 May 23.

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Acute caffeine intake can attenuate homeostatic sleep pressure and worsen sleep quality. Caffeine intake-particularly in high doses and close to bedtime-may also affect circadian-regulated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep promotion, an important determinant of subjective sleep quality. However, it is not known whether such changes persist under chronic caffeine consumption during daytime. Twenty male caffeine consumers (26.4 ± 4 years old, habitual caffeine intake 478.1 ± 102.8 mg/day) participated in a double-blind crossover study. Each volunteer completed a caffeine (3 × 150 mg caffeine daily for 10 days), a withdrawal (3 × 150 mg caffeine for 8 days then placebo), and a placebo condition. After 10 days of controlled intake and a fixed sleep-wake cycle, we recorded electroencephalography for 8 h starting 5 h after habitual bedtime (i.e., start on average at 04:22 h which is around the peak of circadian REM sleep promotion). A 60-min evening nap preceded each sleep episode and reduced high sleep pressure levels. While total sleep time and sleep architecture did not significantly differ between the three conditions, REM sleep latency was longer after daily caffeine intake compared with both placebo and withdrawal. Moreover, the accumulation of REM sleep proportion was delayed, and volunteers reported more difficulties with awakening after sleep and feeling more tired upon wake-up in the caffeine condition compared with placebo. Our data indicate that besides acute intake, also regular daytime caffeine intake affects REM sleep regulation in men, such that it delays circadian REM sleep promotion when compared with placebo. Moreover, the observed caffeine-induced deterioration in the quality of awakening may suggest a potential motive to reinstate caffeine intake after sleep.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/07487304211013995DOI Listing
May 2021

The impact of daily caffeine intake on nighttime sleep in young adult men.

Sci Rep 2021 Feb 25;11(1):4668. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Acute caffeine intake can delay sleep initiation and reduce sleep intensity, particularly when consumed in the evening. However, it is not clear whether these sleep disturbances disappear when caffeine is continuously consumed during daytime, which is common for most coffee drinkers. To address this question, we investigated the sleep of twenty male young habitual caffeine consumers during a double-blind, randomized, crossover study including three 10-day conditions: caffeine (3 × 150 mg caffeine daily), withdrawal (3 × 150 mg caffeine for 8 days, then switch to placebo), and placebo (3 × placebo daily). After 9 days of continuous treatment, electroencephalographically (EEG)-derived sleep structure and intensity were recorded during a scheduled 8-h nighttime sleep episode starting 8 (caffeine condition) and 15 h (withdrawal condition) after the last caffeine intake. Upon scheduled wake-up time, subjective sleep quality and caffeine withdrawal symptoms were assessed. Unexpectedly, neither polysomnography-derived total sleep time, sleep latency, sleep architecture nor subjective sleep quality differed among placebo, caffeine, and withdrawal conditions. Nevertheless, EEG power density in the sigma frequencies (12-16 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement sleep was reduced in both caffeine and withdrawal conditions when compared to placebo. These results indicate that daily caffeine intake in the morning and afternoon hours does not strongly impair nighttime sleep structure nor subjective sleep quality in healthy good sleepers who regularly consume caffeine. The reduced EEG power density in the sigma range might represent early signs of overnight withdrawal from the continuous presence of the stimulant during the day.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-84088-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7907384PMC
February 2021

Caffeine-dependent changes of sleep-wake regulation: Evidence for adaptation after repeated intake.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2020 04 19;99:109851. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Circadian and sleep-homeostatic mechanisms regulate timing and quality of wakefulness. To enhance wakefulness, daily consumption of caffeine in the morning and afternoon is highly common. However, the effects of such a regular intake pattern on circadian sleep-wake regulation are unknown. Thus, we investigated if daily daytime caffeine intake and caffeine withdrawal affect circadian rhythms and wake-promotion in habitual consumers.

Methods: Twenty male young volunteers participated in a randomised, double-blind, within-subject study with three conditions: i) caffeine (150 mg 3 x daily for 10 days), ii) placebo (3 x daily for 10 days) and iii) withdrawal (150 mg caffeine 3 x daily for eight days, followed by a switch to placebo for two days). Starting on day nine of treatment, salivary melatonin and cortisol, evening nap sleep as well as sleepiness and vigilance performance throughout day and night were quantified during 43 h in an in-laboratory, light and posture-controlled protocol.

Results: Neither the time course of melatonin (i.e. onset, amplitude or area under the curve) nor the time course of cortisol was significantly affected by caffeine or withdrawal. During withdrawal, however, volunteers reported increased sleepiness, showed more attentional lapses as well as polysomnography-derived markers of elevated sleep propensity in the late evening compared to both the placebo and caffeine condition.

Conclusions: The typical pattern of caffeine intake with consumption in both the morning and afternoon hours may not necessarily result in a circadian phase shift in the evening nor lead to clear-cut benefits in alertness. The time-of-day independent effects of caffeine withdrawal on evening nap sleep, sleepiness and performance suggest an adaptation to the substance, presumably in the homeostatic aspect of sleep-wake regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2019.109851DOI Listing
April 2020