Publications by authors named "Joseph V Thakuria"

9 Publications

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The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies.

Authors:
Claire Redin Harrison Brand Ryan L Collins Tammy Kammin Elyse Mitchell Jennelle C Hodge Carrie Hanscom Vamsee Pillalamarri Catarina M Seabra Mary-Alice Abbott Omar A Abdul-Rahman Erika Aberg Rhett Adley Sofia L Alcaraz-Estrada Fowzan S Alkuraya Yu An Mary-Anne Anderson Caroline Antolik Kwame Anyane-Yeboa Joan F Atkin Tina Bartell Jonathan A Bernstein Elizabeth Beyer Ian Blumenthal Ernie M H F Bongers Eva H Brilstra Chester W Brown Hennie T Brüggenwirth Bert Callewaert Colby Chiang Ken Corning Helen Cox Edwin Cuppen Benjamin B Currall Tom Cushing Dezso David Matthew A Deardorff Annelies Dheedene Marc D'Hooghe Bert B A de Vries Dawn L Earl Heather L Ferguson Heather Fisher David R FitzPatrick Pamela Gerrol Daniela Giachino Joseph T Glessner Troy Gliem Margo Grady Brett H Graham Cristin Griffis Karen W Gripp Andrea L Gropman Andrea Hanson-Kahn David J Harris Mark A Hayden Rosamund Hill Ron Hochstenbach Jodi D Hoffman Robert J Hopkin Monika W Hubshman A Micheil Innes Mira Irons Melita Irving Jessie C Jacobsen Sandra Janssens Tamison Jewett John P Johnson Marjolijn C Jongmans Stephen G Kahler David A Koolen Jerome Korzelius Peter M Kroisel Yves Lacassie William Lawless Emmanuelle Lemyre Kathleen Leppig Alex V Levin Haibo Li Hong Li Eric C Liao Cynthia Lim Edward J Lose Diane Lucente Michael J Macera Poornima Manavalan Giorgia Mandrile Carlo L Marcelis Lauren Margolin Tamara Mason Diane Masser-Frye Michael W McClellan Cinthya J Zepeda Mendoza Björn Menten Sjors Middelkamp Liya R Mikami Emily Moe Shehla Mohammed Tarja Mononen Megan E Mortenson Graciela Moya Aggie W Nieuwint Zehra Ordulu Sandhya Parkash Susan P Pauker Shahrin Pereira Danielle Perrin Katy Phelan Raul E Piña Aguilar Pino J Poddighe Giulia Pregno Salmo Raskin Linda Reis William Rhead Debra Rita Ivo Renkens Filip Roelens Jayla Ruliera Patrick Rump Samantha L P Schilit Ranad Shaheen Rebecca Sparkes Erica Spiegel Blair Stevens Matthew R Stone Julia Tagoe Joseph V Thakuria Bregje W van Bon Jiddeke van de Kamp Ineke van Der Burgt Ton van Essen Conny M van Ravenswaaij-Arts Markus J van Roosmalen Sarah Vergult Catharina M L Volker-Touw Dorothy P Warburton Matthew J Waterman Susan Wiley Anna Wilson Maria de la Concepcion A Yerena-de Vega Roberto T Zori Brynn Levy Han G Brunner Nicole de Leeuw Wigard P Kloosterman Erik C Thorland Cynthia C Morton James F Gusella Michael E Talkowski

Nat Genet 2017 01 14;49(1):36-45. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Molecular Neurogenetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing revised 93% of karyotypes and demonstrated complexity that was cryptic to karyotyping in 21% of BCAs, highlighting the limitations of conventional cytogenetic approaches. At least 33.9% of BCAs resulted in gene disruption that likely contributed to the developmental phenotype, 5.2% were associated with pathogenic genomic imbalances, and 7.3% disrupted topologically associated domains (TADs) encompassing known syndromic loci. Remarkably, BCA breakpoints in eight subjects altered a single TAD encompassing MEF2C, a known driver of 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome, resulting in decreased MEF2C expression. We propose that sequence-level resolution dramatically improves prediction of clinical outcomes for balanced rearrangements and provides insight into new pathogenic mechanisms, such as altered regulation due to changes in chromosome topology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3720DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5307971PMC
January 2017

A public resource facilitating clinical use of genomes.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012 Jul 13;109(30):11920-7. Epub 2012 Jul 13.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Rapid advances in DNA sequencing promise to enable new diagnostics and individualized therapies. Achieving personalized medicine, however, will require extensive research on highly reidentifiable, integrated datasets of genomic and health information. To assist with this, participants in the Personal Genome Project choose to forgo privacy via our institutional review board- approved "open consent" process. The contribution of public data and samples facilitates both scientific discovery and standardization of methods. We present our findings after enrollment of more than 1,800 participants, including whole-genome sequencing of 10 pilot participant genomes (the PGP-10). We introduce the Genome-Environment-Trait Evidence (GET-Evidence) system. This tool automatically processes genomes and prioritizes both published and novel variants for interpretation. In the process of reviewing the presumed healthy PGP-10 genomes, we find numerous literature references implying serious disease. Although it is sometimes impossible to rule out a late-onset effect, stringent evidence requirements can address the high rate of incidental findings. To that end we develop a peer production system for recording and organizing variant evaluations according to standard evidence guidelines, creating a public forum for reaching consensus on interpretation of clinically relevant variants. Genome analysis becomes a two-step process: using a prioritized list to record variant evaluations, then automatically sorting reviewed variants using these annotations. Genome data, health and trait information, participant samples, and variant interpretations are all shared in the public domain-we invite others to review our results using our participant samples and contribute to our interpretations. We offer our public resource and methods to further personalized medical research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1201904109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3409785PMC
July 2012

Back to the future: from genome to metabolome.

Hum Mutat 2012 May;33(5):809-12

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

In the traditional medical genetics setting, metabolic disorders, identified either clinically or through biochemical screening, undergo subsequent single gene testing to molecularly confirm diagnosis, provide further insight on natural disease history, and inform on disease management, treatment, familial testing, and reproductive options. For decades now, this process has been responsible for saving many lives worldwide. Only recently, though, has it become possible to move in the opposite direction by starting with an individual's whole genome or exome, and, guided by this data, study more minor perturbations in the absolute values and substrate ratios of clinically important biochemical analytes. Genomic individuality can also be used to guide more detailed phenotyping aimed at uncovering milder manifestations of known metabolic diseases. Metabolomic phenotyping in the Personal Genome Project for our first 200+ participants-all of whom are scheduled to have full genome sequence at more than 40× coverage available by May 2012-is aimed at uncovering potential subclinical and preclinical disease states in carriers of known pathogenic mutations and in lesser known rare variants that are protein predicted to be pathogenic. Our initial focus targets 88 genes involved in 68 metabolic disturbances with established evidence-based nutritional and/or pharmacological therapy as part of standard medical care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.22073DOI Listing
May 2012

Direct tissue evaluation via immunofluorescence: in the diagnosis of hereditary transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis.

Tex Heart Inst J 2012 ;39(1):71-5

Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Multiple precursor proteins have been shown to cause cardiac amyloidosis. The most common forms are due either to immunoglobulin light chains or to transthyretin proteins (either wild-type or mutant forms). Correct subclassification of the amyloid is paramount because treatment differs in accordance with the type of amyloidosis. Indirect diagnostic methods, including serologic analysis, can lead to misdiagnosis. Definitive diagnosis often requires analysis of amyloid in the tissue. We present a case of a woman who was diagnosed with hereditary transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis by means of immunofluorescence and genetic analysis. This case highlights the importance-in the diagnostic algorithm of cardiac amyloidosis-of direct evaluation of the tissue with immunofluorescence and of genetic testing.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3298917PMC
November 2012

Phased whole-genome genetic risk in a family quartet using a major allele reference sequence.

PLoS Genet 2011 Sep 15;7(9):e1002280. Epub 2011 Sep 15.

Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

Whole-genome sequencing harbors unprecedented potential for characterization of individual and family genetic variation. Here, we develop a novel synthetic human reference sequence that is ethnically concordant and use it for the analysis of genomes from a nuclear family with history of familial thrombophilia. We demonstrate that the use of the major allele reference sequence results in improved genotype accuracy for disease-associated variant loci. We infer recombination sites to the lowest median resolution demonstrated to date (< 1,000 base pairs). We use family inheritance state analysis to control sequencing error and inform family-wide haplotype phasing, allowing quantification of genome-wide compound heterozygosity. We develop a sequence-based methodology for Human Leukocyte Antigen typing that contributes to disease risk prediction. Finally, we advance methods for analysis of disease and pharmacogenomic risk across the coding and non-coding genome that incorporate phased variant data. We show these methods are capable of identifying multigenic risk for inherited thrombophilia and informing the appropriate pharmacological therapy. These ethnicity-specific, family-based approaches to interpretation of genetic variation are emblematic of the next generation of genetic risk assessment using whole-genome sequencing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3174201PMC
September 2011

Ethical and practical guidelines for reporting genetic research results to study participants: updated guidelines from a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute working group.

Circ Cardiovasc Genet 2010 Dec;3(6):574-80

Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Epidemiology Branch, 6701 Rockledge Drive/ MSC 7935, Bethesda, MD20892, USA.

In January 2009, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a 28-member multidisciplinary Working Group to update the recommendations of a 2004 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group focused on Guidelines to the Return of Genetic Research Results. Changes in the genetic and societal landscape over the intervening 5 years raise multiple questions and challenges. The group noted the complex issues arising from the fact that technological and bioinformatic progress has made it possible to obtain considerable information on individuals that would not have been possible a decade ago. Although unable to reach consensus on a number of issues, the working group produced 5 recommendations. The working group offers 2 recommendations addressing the criteria necessary to determine when genetic results should and may be returned to study participants, respectively. In addition, it suggests that a time limit be established to limit the duration of obligation of investigators to return genetic research results. The group recommends the creation of a central body, or bodies, to provide guidance on when genetic research results are associated with sufficient risk and have established clinical utility to justify their return to study participants. The final recommendation urges investigators to engage the broader community when dealing with identifiable communities to advise them on the return of aggregate and individual research results. Creation of an entity charged to provide guidance to institutional review boards, investigators, research institutions, and research sponsors would provide rigorous review of available data, promote standardization of study policies regarding return of genetic research results, and enable investigators and study participants to clarify and share expectations for the handling of this increasingly valuable information with appropriate respect for the rights and needs of participants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.110.958827DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3090664PMC
December 2010

Clinical assessment incorporating a personal genome.

Lancet 2010 May;375(9725):1525-35

Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

Background: The cost of genomic information has fallen steeply, but the clinical translation of genetic risk estimates remains unclear. We aimed to undertake an integrated analysis of a complete human genome in a clinical context.

Methods: We assessed a patient with a family history of vascular disease and early sudden death. Clinical assessment included analysis of this patient's full genome sequence, risk prediction for coronary artery disease, screening for causes of sudden cardiac death, and genetic counselling. Genetic analysis included the development of novel methods for the integration of whole genome and clinical risk. Disease and risk analysis focused on prediction of genetic risk of variants associated with mendelian disease, recognised drug responses, and pathogenicity for novel variants. We queried disease-specific mutation databases and pharmacogenomics databases to identify genes and mutations with known associations with disease and drug response. We estimated post-test probabilities of disease by applying likelihood ratios derived from integration of multiple common variants to age-appropriate and sex-appropriate pre-test probabilities. We also accounted for gene-environment interactions and conditionally dependent risks.

Findings: Analysis of 2.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and 752 copy number variations showed increased genetic risk for myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers. We discovered rare variants in three genes that are clinically associated with sudden cardiac death-TMEM43, DSP, and MYBPC3. A variant in LPA was consistent with a family history of coronary artery disease. The patient had a heterozygous null mutation in CYP2C19 suggesting probable clopidogrel resistance, several variants associated with a positive response to lipid-lowering therapy, and variants in CYP4F2 and VKORC1 that suggest he might have a low initial dosing requirement for warfarin. Many variants of uncertain importance were reported.

Interpretation: Although challenges remain, our results suggest that whole-genome sequencing can yield useful and clinically relevant information for individual patients.

Funding: National Institute of General Medical Sciences; National Heart, Lung And Blood Institute; National Human Genome Research Institute; Howard Hughes Medical Institute; National Library of Medicine, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health; Hewlett Packard Foundation; Breetwor Family Foundation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60452-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2937184PMC
May 2010

Personal genomes in progress: from the human genome project to the personal genome project.

Dialogues Clin Neurosci 2010 ;12(1):47-60

European Centre for Public Health Genomics, FHML, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007--even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polylmorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181947PMC
April 2010

Human genome sequencing using unchained base reads on self-assembling DNA nanoarrays.

Science 2010 Jan 5;327(5961):78-81. Epub 2009 Nov 5.

Complete Genomics, Inc., 2071 Stierlin Court, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA.

Genome sequencing of large numbers of individuals promises to advance the understanding, treatment, and prevention of human diseases, among other applications. We describe a genome sequencing platform that achieves efficient imaging and low reagent consumption with combinatorial probe anchor ligation chemistry to independently assay each base from patterned nanoarrays of self-assembling DNA nanoballs. We sequenced three human genomes with this platform, generating an average of 45- to 87-fold coverage per genome and identifying 3.2 to 4.5 million sequence variants per genome. Validation of one genome data set demonstrates a sequence accuracy of about 1 false variant per 100 kilobases. The high accuracy, affordable cost of $4400 for sequencing consumables, and scalability of this platform enable complete human genome sequencing for the detection of rare variants in large-scale genetic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1181498DOI Listing
January 2010