Publications by authors named "Joseph L Kuijper"

5 Publications

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An Antibody Against Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 (TREM-1) Dampens Proinflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Lamina Propria Cells from Patients with IBD.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2016 08;22(8):1803-11

*Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden;†Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden;‡Novo Nordisk Research Center, Seattle, USA; and§Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark.

Background: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) is a potent amplifier of inflammation. Recently, the antimicrobial peptide PGLYRP-1 was shown to be the ligand of TREM-1. Here, the ability of an anti-TREM-1 antibody to dampen the release of proinflammatory cytokines by colon lamina propria cells (LPCs) from patients with IBD was investigated and correlated with PGLYRP-1 levels.

Methods: Biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 45) or Crohn's disease (CD, n = 26) were compared with those from individuals undergoing colonoscopy for other reasons (n = 17). TREM-1 expression was analyzed on myeloid cells by flow cytometry. Cell culture experiments with LPCs were used to analyze PGLYRP-1 and inflammatory cytokine levels and assess the effect of anti-TREM-1 on cytokine secretion.

Results: The frequency of TREM-1-expressing neutrophils and recruited macrophages was higher in inflamed than in noninflamed biopsies. The PGLYRP-1 level in inflamed tissue was higher than in noninflamed tissue; it was produced primarily by neutrophils, and its level correlated with the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Secretion of myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-8 by LPCs stimulated with the potent TREM-1 agonist consisting of PGLYRP-1 complexed with peptidoglycan was reduced in the presence of anti-TREM-1. Moreover, a blocking effect of anti-TREM-1 was apparent when LPCs from a subset of inflamed individuals with elevated PGLYRP-1 were stimulated with killed bacteria.

Conclusions: An anti-TREM-1 antibody can dampen secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in inflamed patients with elevated PGLYRP-1. Moreover, PGLYRP-1 + myeloperoxidase is a potential biomarker for predicting the effect of anti-TREM-1 therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MIB.0000000000000822DOI Listing
August 2016

Cutting Edge: identification of neutrophil PGLYRP1 as a ligand for TREM-1.

J Immunol 2015 Feb 16;194(4):1417-21. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Novo Nordisk A/S, DK-2760 Måløv, Denmark; and

Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 is an orphan receptor implicated in innate immune activation. Inhibition of TREM-1 reduces sepsis in mouse models, suggesting a role for it in immune responses triggered by bacteria. However, the absence of an identified ligand has hampered a full understanding of TREM-1 function. We identified complexes between peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP1) and bacterially derived peptidoglycan that constitute a potent ligand capable of binding TREM-1 and inducing known TREM-1 functions. Interestingly, multimerization of PGLYRP1 bypassed the need for peptidoglycan in TREM-1 activation, demonstrating that the PGLYRP1/TREM-1 axis can be activated in the absence of bacterial products. The role for PGLYRP1 as a TREM-1 activator provides a new mechanism by which bacteria can trigger myeloid cells, linking two known, but previously unrelated, pathways in innate immunity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1402303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4319313PMC
February 2015

Vstm3 is a member of the CD28 family and an important modulator of T-cell function.

Eur J Immunol 2011 Apr 18;41(4):902-15. Epub 2011 Mar 18.

Department of Immunology, ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA.

Members of the CD28 family play important roles in regulating T-cell functions and share a common gene structure profile. We have identified VSTM3 as a protein whose gene structure matches that of the other CD28 family members. This protein (also known as TIGIT and WUCAM) has been previously shown to affect immune responses and is expressed on NK cells, activated and memory T cells, and Tregs. The nectin-family proteins CD155 and CD112 serve as counter-structures for VSTM3, and CD155 and CD112 also bind to the activating receptor CD226 on T cells and NK cells. Hence, this group of interacting proteins forms a network of molecules similar to the well-characterized CD28-CTLA-4-CD80-CD86 network. In the same way that soluble CTLA-4 can be used to block T-cell responses, we show that soluble Vstm3 attenuates T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, animals deficient in Vstm3 are more sensitive to autoimmune challenges indicating that this new member of the CD28 family is an important regulator of T-cell responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201041136DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3733993PMC
April 2011

Engineering of stable bispecific antibodies targeting IL-17A and IL-23.

Protein Eng Des Sel 2010 Mar 18;23(3):115-27. Epub 2009 Dec 18.

ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA 98102, USA.

Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) present an attractive opportunity to combine the additive and potentially synergistic effects exhibited by combinations of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Current challenges for engineering bsAbs include retention of the binding affinity of the parent mAb or antibody fragment, the ability to bind both targets simultaneously, and matching valency with biology. Other factors to consider include structural stability and expression of the recombinant molecule, both of which may have significant impact on its development as a therapeutic. Here, we incorporate selection of stable, potent single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) early in the engineering process to assemble bsAbs for therapeutic applications targeting the cytokines IL-17A/A and IL-23. Stable scFvs directed against human cytokines IL-23p19 and IL-17A/A were isolated from a human Fab phage display library via batch conversion of panning output from Fabs to scFvs. This strategy integrated a step for shuffling V regions during the conversion and permitted the rescue of scFv molecules in both the V(H)V(L) and the V(L)V(H) orientations. Stable scFvs were identified and assembled into several bispecific formats as fusions to the Fc domain of human IgG1. The engineered bsAbs are potent neutralizers of the biological activity of both cytokines (IC(50) < 1 nM), demonstrate the ability to bind both target ligands simultaneously and display stability and productivity advantageous for successful manufacture of a therapeutic molecule. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the bsAbs in mice revealed serum half-lives similar to human mAbs. Assembly of bispecific molecules using stable antibody fragments offers an alternative to reformatting mAbs and minimizes subsequent structure-related and manufacturing concerns.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/protein/gzp073DOI Listing
March 2010

Interleukin 31, a cytokine produced by activated T cells, induces dermatitis in mice.

Nat Immunol 2004 Jul 6;5(7):752-60. Epub 2004 Jun 6.

Department of Immunology, ZymoGenetics, 1201 Eastlake Avenue East, Seattle, Washington 98102, USA.

T cell-derived cytokines are important in the development of an effective immune response, but when dysregulated they can promote disease. Here we identify a four-helix bundle cytokine we have called interleukin 31 (IL-31), which is preferentially produced by T helper type 2 cells. IL-31 signals through a receptor composed of IL-31 receptor A and oncostatin M receptor. Expression of IL-31 receptor A and oncostatin M receptor mRNA was induced in activated monocytes, whereas epithelial cells expressed both mRNAs constitutively. Transgenic mice overexpressing IL-31 developed severe pruritus, alopecia and skin lesions. Furthermore, IL-31 receptor expression was increased in diseased tissues derived from an animal model of airway hypersensitivity. These data indicate that IL-31 may be involved in promoting the dermatitis and epithelial responses that characterize allergic and non-allergic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ni1084DOI Listing
July 2004