Publications by authors named "Joseph B Kahan"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sex- and Sports-Specific Epidemiology of Traumatic Lumbar Spine Injuries Sustained During Sporting Activities: Male Snowboarders and Female Horseback Riders at Greatest Risk.

Arthrosc Sports Med Rehabil 2021 Apr 30;3(2):e515-e520. Epub 2021 Jan 30.

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Purpose: To generate national estimates of sports-related traumatic lumbar spine injury incidence rates using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) database and determine any sports- and sex-specific epidemiologic patterns of these traumatic injuries.

Methods: Data regarding traumatic lumbar spine injuries sustained through sporting activities from 2009 to 2018 were extracted from the NEISS, a database generating nationwide estimates through patient information collected during emergency department visits from 100 NEISS hospitals across the United States. The estimated number of injuries was calculated using weights assigned by the NEISS database depending on the geographic location of the injury.

Results: A total of 497 traumatic lumbar spine injuries were identified over the course of 10 years, suggesting 19,208 estimated injuries. The estimated average injury rate was 6.1 injuries per million persons per year. When analyzed by sex, the incidence rate of traumatic lumbar spine injury was 3.6 injuries per million persons per year for male patients and 2.5 injuries per million persons per year for female patients ( = .663). In male patients, 47% of the injuries occurred in individuals aged between 10 and 29 years, whereas injuries in female patients were more equally distributed across different age groups. Horseback riding (27%), skiing (5%), and roller skating (4%) were the leading causes of traumatic lumbar injuries in female patients. In male patients, most injuries were experienced as a result of snowboarding (13%), weightlifting (10%), and football (6%).

Conclusions: From 2009 to 2018, the estimated incidence of sports-associated traumatic lumbar spine injuries was approximately 6.1 injuries per million persons per year. Male patients experienced a greater number of traumatic lumbar injuries (3.60) than female patients (2.46), with a relative incidence rate of 1.46. The most common source of injury was snowboarding in male patients and horseback riding in female patients.

Level Of Evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asmr.2020.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8129455PMC
April 2021

Correction of a Squeaky Knee After ACL Reconstruction Surgery: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect 2021 Apr-Jun;11(2):e20.00856

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, New Haven, Connecticut.

Case: We report a squeaking knee complication on weight-bearing and active flexion-extension because of a migrating nonabsorbable FiberWire suture in a 16-year-old boy who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Although not physically limiting, the noise caused psychological distress in our patient as a young adult. As the noise did not resolve with nonsurgical treatment, we performed arthroscopic surgical correction and removed loose FiberWire strands protruding from the femoral tunnel which completely eliminated the sound.

Conclusions: Squeaking knee complications because of migrating nonabsorbable sutures post-ACL reconstruction surgery do not heal with time and can be corrected surgically.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.CC.20.00856DOI Listing
May 2021

Modification and application of the proximal humerus ossification system to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

Spine Deform 2021 May 3. Epub 2021 May 3.

Division of Orthopedics, Texas Children's Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that proximal humeral ossification patterns are reliable for assessing peak height velocity in growing patients. Here, we sought to modify the system by including medial physeal closure and evaluate whether this system combined with the Cobb angle correlates with progression to surgery in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

Methods: We reviewed 616 radiographs from 79 children in a historical collection to integrate closure of the medial physis into novel stages 3A and 3B. We then analyzed radiographs from the initial presentation of 202 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who had either undergone surgery or completed monitoring at skeletal maturity. Summary statistics for the percentage of patients who progressed to the surgical range were calculated for each category of humerus and Cobb angle.

Results: The intra-observer and inter-observer ICC for assessment of the medial physis was 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. Only 3.4% of radiographs were unable to be assessed for medial humerus closure. The medial humerus physis begins to close about 1 year prior to the lateral physis and patients with a closing medial physis, but an open lateral physis were found to be the closest to PHV (0.7 years). Stratifying patients by Cobb angle and modified humerus stage yield categories with low and high risks of progression to the surgical range.

Conclusion: The medial humerus can be accurately evaluated and integrated into a new modified proximal humerus ossification system. Patients with humerus stage 3A or below have a higher rate of progression to the surgical range than those with humerus stage 3B or above.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43390-021-00338-yDOI Listing
May 2021

Popliteal Artery Occlusion with Collateral Blood Flow in a Reducible Knee Dislocation During Pregnancy: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect 2021 04 9;11(2). Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Case: A 29-year-old healthy woman, 19 weeks pregnant, sustained a right posterolateral knee dislocation with multiligamentous injury and a complete occlusive injury to the right popliteal artery yet had adequate distal perfusion. She declined operative management for both the knee dislocation and the arterial injury, and successful collaboration between obstetrical, vascular, and orthopaedic surgical services resulted in limb preservation and restoration of function.

Conclusion: This is a unique case of traumatic complete popliteal artery occlusion with adequate collateral arterial perfusion after a reducible posterolateral knee dislocation in a pregnant patient that resulted in limb preservation with nonoperative management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.CC.20.00516DOI Listing
April 2021

Temporal Utilization of Physical Therapy Visits After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Orthop J Sports Med 2021 Feb 19;9(2):2325967120982293. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Background: Physical therapy (PT) rehabilitation is critical to successful outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Later-stage rehabilitation, including sport-specific exercises, is increasingly recognized for restoring high-level knee function. However, supervised PT visits have historically been concentrated during the early stages of recovery after ACLR.

Purpose/hypothesis: To assess the number and temporal utilization of PT visits after ACLR in a national cohort. We hypothesized that PT visits would be concentrated early in the postoperative period.

Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study.

Methods: The Humana PearlDiver database was searched to identify patients who underwent ACLR between 2007 and 2017. Patients with additional structures treated were excluded. The mean ± SD, median and interquartile range (IQR), and range of number of PT visits for each patient were determined for the 52 weeks after ACLR. PT visits over time were also assessed in relation to patient age and sex.

Results: In total, 11,518 patients who underwent ACLR met the inclusion criteria; the mean age was 32.62 ± 13.70 years, and 42.7% were female patients. Of this study cohort, 10,381 (90.4%) had documented PT postoperatively; the range of PT visits was 0 to 121. On average, patients had 16.90 ± 10.60 PT visits (median [IQR], 16 [9-22]) after ACLR. Patients completed a mean of 52% of their PT visits in the first 6 weeks, 75% in the first 10 weeks, and 90% in the first 16 weeks after surgery. Patients aged 10 to 19 years had the highest number of PT visits (mean ± SD, 19.67 ± 12.09; median [IQR], 18 [12-25]), significantly greater than other age groups ( < .001).

Conclusion: PT after ACLR is concentrated in the early postoperative period. Physicians, therapists, and patients may consider adjusting the limited access to PT to optimize patient recovery.

Clinical Relevance: As supervised PT visits may be limited, the appropriate temporal utilization of supervised PT visits must be maximized. Strategies to ensure sessions for later neuromuscular and activity-specific rehabilitation are needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967120982293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7900793PMC
February 2021

Increased Neurovascular Morbidity Is Seen in Documented Knee Dislocation Versus Multiligamentous Knee Injury.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2021 May;103(10):921-930

Departments of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation (J.B.K., C.A.S., L.P., and M.J.M.) and Radiology and Biomedical Imaging (J.P.), Yale School of Medicine (D.L. and P.H.), New Haven, Connecticut.

Update: This article was updated on May 19, 2021 because of previous errors, which were discovered after the preliminary version of the article was posted online. In the legend for Figure 3-A, the phrase that had read "T1-weighted coronal MRI showing a right knee" now reads "T1-weighted coronal MRI showing a left knee." On page 924, in the section entitled "Materials and Methods," the sentence that had read "If there was no radiographic evidence or if there was a clinical note that documented visible deformity around the knee with no reduction maneuver being performed, then the patient was classified into the non-dislocated MLKI group." now reads "If there was no radiographic evidence or if there was no clinical note that documented visible deformity around the knee with no reduction maneuver being performed, then the patient was classified into the non-dislocated MLKI group." On page 925, in the section entitled "Analysis," the sentence that had read "Our study included 78 dislocated MLKIs and non-dislocated MLKIs, so both cohorts were adequately powered for the overall analysis." now reads "Our study included 45 dislocated MLKIs and 78 non-dislocated MLKIs, so both cohorts were adequately powered for the overall analysis." Finally, on page 927, in the section entitled "Discussion," the sentence that had read "Interestingly, we found that MLKIs with a documented knee dislocation had a substantially higher rate of vascular injury (23%) compared with those without (3%)." now reads "Interestingly, we found that MLKIs with a documented knee dislocation had a substantially higher rate of vascular injury (18%) compared with those without (4%)."
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.20.01151DOI Listing
May 2021

Suprascapular Neuropathy From Malpositioned Baseplate Screws in Primary Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: Two Case Reports.

JBJS Case Connect 2020 10 26;10(4):e20.00096. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Cases: Two patients presented to different surgeons complaining of persistent shoulder pain after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Workups for fracture, instability, and periprosthetic infection were negative. Advanced imaging, nerve conduction studies, and diagnostic injections localized symptoms to the suprascapular nerve. Revision arthroplasty with removal of the offending screws improved pain in both patients.

Conclusion: Suprascapular nerve irritation because of the malposition of baseplate screws in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty can be a source of postoperative pain. Removal of the offending screw without formal nerve exploration may result in symptomatic improvement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.CC.20.00096DOI Listing
October 2020

High School Athletic Directors Report Poor Compliance With Concussion Reporting and Medical Clearance in Massachusetts.

Arthrosc Sports Med Rehabil 2020 Oct 22;2(5):e563-e567. Epub 2020 Sep 22.

Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Purpose: To assess statewide prevalence of medical access, concussion reporting, and concussion clearance rates of high school athletic departments in Massachusetts after the implementation of state-wide concussion legislation.

Methods: A random sample of 50 athletic directors (ADs) from Massachusetts high schools with an enrollment of >150 students was selected. A 10-minute electronic survey about access to athletic trainers and physicians, and concussion reporting and clearance practices was administered. Responses were anonymous.

Results: The response rate was 80% (n = 40). In total, 90% of respondents were male. Median age and experience of respondents was 52 years old and 10 years, respectively. The median school size was 637 students, represented from all Massachusetts geographic athletic districts. ADs disclosed that on average, 12% (95% confidence interval 7%-20%) of concussions go unreported at their schools. In total, 16% of respondents reported that at least 1 in 4 of concussed athletes at their school returned to play without appropriate medical clearance, and 5% of ADs reported that not all of their coaches had undergone any form of concussion training. Overall, 55% of high schools do not have access to a full-time athletic trainer and 50% do not have a team physician; 20% have affiliations with an orthopaedic surgeon and 8% with a neurologist.

Conclusions: Despite new regulations in Massachusetts, high school ADs report concussion reporting and clearance that are less than 100%. Less than one half of all Massachusetts high schools report access to a full-time athletic trainer or formal relationship with a school physician.

Clinical Relevance: Investigating compliance with Massachusetts school athletics safety regulations could help identify a need for reform of policies designed to help schools keep student athletes safer in situations where a concussion may have occurred.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asmr.2020.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7590589PMC
October 2020

The Pathoanatomy of Posterolateral Corner Ligamentous Disruption in Multiligament Knee Injuries Is Predictive of Peroneal Nerve Injury.

Am J Sports Med 2020 12 19;48(14):3541-3548. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Background: A description of the precise locations of ligamentous and myotendinous injury patterns of acute posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries and their associated osseous and neurovascular injuries is lacking in the literature.

Purpose: To characterize the ligamentous and myotendinous injury patterns and zones of injury that occur in acute PLC injuries and determine associated rates of peroneal nerve palsies and vascular injuries, as well as fracture and dislocation.

Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: We retrospectively identified all patients treated for an acute multiligament knee injury (MLKI) at our level 1 trauma center from 2001 to 2018. From this cohort, all patients with PLC injuries were identified. Demographics, involved ligaments and tendons, neurovascular injury, and presence of fracture and dislocation were compared with the larger multiligament knee cohort. Incidence and location of injury of PLC structures-from proximal to midsubstance and distal injury-were recorded.

Results: A total of 100 knees in 100 patients were identified as having MLKIs. A total of 74 patients (74%) had lateral-sided ligament injuries. Of these, 23 (31%) had a peroneal nerve palsy associated with their injury; 10 (14%), a vascular injury; and 23 (31%), a fracture. Patients with PLC injuries had higher rates of peroneal nerve injury as compared with those having acute MLKIs without a PLC injury (31% vs 4%; = .005). Patients with a complete peroneal nerve palsy (n = 17) were less likely to regain function than those with a partial peroneal nerve palsy (n = 6; 12% vs 100%; < .0001). Complete injury to the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) occurred in 71 of 74 (96%) PLC injuries, with 3 distinct patterns of injury demonstrated. Fibular avulsion of the LCL was the most common zone of injury (65%), followed by femoral avulsion (20%) and midsubstance tear (15%). Location of injury to the LCL was associated with the rate of peroneal nerve injury, with midsubstance tears and fibular avulsions associated with higher rates of peroneal nerve injury.

Conclusion: MLKIs with involvement of the PLC are more likely to suffer peroneal nerve injury. The LCL is nearly always involved, and its location of injury is predictive of peroneal nerve injury. Patients with a complete peroneal nerve palsy at presentation are much less likely to regain function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546520962503DOI Listing
December 2020

Patients' and Physicians' Knowledge of Radiation Exposure Related to Spine Surgery.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2020 Nov;45(22):E1507-E1515

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

Study Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Objective: Examine patients' and physicians' estimates of radiation exposure related to spine surgery.

Summary Of Background Data: Patients are commonly exposed to radiation when undergoing spine surgery. Previous studies suggest that patients and physicians have limited knowledge about radiation exposure in the outpatient setting. This has not been assessed for intraoperative imaging.

Methods: A questionnaire was developed to assess awareness/knowledge of radiation exposure in outpatient and intraoperative spine care settings. Patients and surgeons estimated chest radiograph (CXR) equivalent radiation from: cervical and lumbar radiographs (anterior-posterior [AP] and lateral), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraoperative fluoroscopy, and intraoperative CT (O-arm). Results were compared to literature-reported radiation doses.

Results: Overall, 100 patients and 26 providers completed the survey. Only 31% of patients were informed about outpatient radiation exposure, and only 23% of those who had undergone spine surgery had been informed about intraoperative radiation exposure. For lumbar radiographs, patients and surgeons underestimated CXR-equivalent radiation exposures: AP by five-fold (P < 0.0001) and seven-fold (P < 0.0001), respectively, and lateral by three-fold (P < 0.0001) and four-fold (P = 0.0002), respectively. For cervical CT imaging, patients and surgeons underestimated radiation exposure by 18-fold (P < 0.0001) and two-fold (P = 0.0339), respectively. For lumbar CT imaging, patients and surgeons underestimated radiation exposure by 31-fold (P < 0.0001) and three-fold (P = 0.0001), respectively. For intraoperative specific cervical and lumbar imaging, patients underestimated radiation exposure for O-arm by 11-fold (P < 0.0001) and 22-fold (P = 0.0002), respectively. Surgeons underestimated radiation exposure of lumbar O-arm by three-fold (P = 0.0227).

Conclusion: This study evaluated patient and physician knowledge of radiation exposure related to spine procedures. Underestimation of radiation exposure in the outpatient setting was consistent with prior study findings. The significant underestimation of intraoperative cross-sectional imaging (O-arm) is notable and needs attention in the era of increased use of such technology for imaging, navigation, and robotic spine surgery.

Level Of Evidence: 4.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000003650DOI Listing
November 2020

Predicting Growth Quantitatively Through Proximal Tibia Radiograph Markers.

J Pediatr Orthop 2020 Oct;40(9):e889-e893

Departments of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

Background: The creation of accurate markers for skeletal maturity has been of significant interest to orthopaedic surgeons. They guide the management of diverse disorders such as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, leg length discrepancy, cruciate ligament injuries, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Multiple systems have been described to predict growth using radiographic skeletal markers; however, no such system has yet been developed for the proximal tibia. The purpose of this study was to establish quantitative radiographic parameters within the proximal tibia that can be used to assess degree of skeletal maturity.

Methods: From the Bolton Brush collection, 94 children, consisting of 49 girls and 4 boys between the ages of 3 and 18 years old, were followed annually throughout growth with serial radiographs and physical examinations. Final height at maturity was used to calculate the growth remaining at each visit. Multiple measurements for each knee radiograph were performed and correlated with the percentage of growth remaining. Tibial epiphysis width, tibial metaphysis width, and height of the lateral tibial epiphysis were measured on each film and the composite ratios between each of these sets of variables along with their respective accuracy and reliability were calculated. Single and multiple linear regression models were constructed to determine accuracy of prediction. Interobserver and intraobserver studies were performed with 4 investigators ranging from medical student to senior attending and calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient. All 4 examiners measured all of the subjects and the ratios created were averaged.

Results: Tibial epiphysis width, tibial metaphysis width, and height of the lateral tibial epiphysis were all found to be strongly correlated with growth remaining with R values ranging from 0.57 to 0.84. In addition, all 3 ratios were found to be reliable with intraobserver and interobserver intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.92 to 0.94 and 0.80 to 0.94, respectively. A multiple linear regression model demonstrated that combining these 3 ratios allows for a predictive R value of 0.917, showing that these ratios when combined were highly predictive of growth remaining. All findings were independent of sex (P=0.996).

Conclusions: We describe 3 measurements that can easily be obtained on an anteroposterior radiograph of the knee. We demonstrate that ratios of these variables can be measured reliably and correlate closely with remaining growth, independent of sex. Together, we believe that these factors will improve the accuracy of determining growth from lower extremity radiographs that include the proximal tibia.

Clinical Relevance: This study provides a new quantitative technique to evaluate growth in the lower extremity, which can inform a range of conditions including adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, leg length discrepancy, cruciate ligament injury, and slipped capital femoral epiphyses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPO.0000000000001587DOI Listing
October 2020

The Proximal Humeral Ossification System Improves Assessment of Maturity in Patients with Scoliosis.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2019 Oct;101(20):1868-1874

Division of Orthopaedics and Scoliosis, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas.

Background: We recently developed a classification system to assess skeletal maturity by scoring proximal humeral ossification in a similar way to the canonical Risser sign. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether our system can be used to reliably assess radiographs of the spine for modern patients with idiopathic scoliosis, whether it can be used in combination with the Sanders hand system, and whether the consideration of patient factors such as age, sex, and standing height improves the accuracy of predictions.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 414 randomized radiographs from 216 modern patients with scoliosis and measured reliability with use of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We then analyzed 606 proximal humeral radiographs for 70 children from a historical collection to determine the value of integrating multiple classification systems. The age of peak height velocity (PHV) was predicted with use of linear regression models, and performance was evaluated with use of tenfold cross-validation.

Results: The proximal humeral ossification system demonstrated excellent reliability in modern patients with scoliosis, with an ICC of 0.97 and 0.92 for intraobserver and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The use of our system in combination with the Sanders hand system yielded 7 categories prior to PHV and demonstrated better results compared with either system alone. Linear regression algorithms showed that integration of the proximal part of the humerus, patient factors, and other classification systems outperformed models based on canonical Risser and triradiate-closure methods.

Conclusions: Humeral head ossification can be reliably assessed in modern patients with scoliosis. Furthermore, the system described here can be used in combination with other parameters such as the Sanders hand system, age, sex, and height to predict PHV and percent growth remaining with high accuracy.

Clinical Relevance: The proximal humeral ossification system can improve the prediction of PHV in patients with scoliosis on the basis of a standard spine radiograph without a hand radiograph for the determination of bone age. This increased accuracy for predicting maturity will allow physicians to better assess patient maturity relative to PHV and therefore can help to guide treatment decision-making without increasing radiation exposure, time, or cost. The present study demonstrates that assessment of the proximal humeral physis is a viable and valuable aid in the determination of skeletal maturity as obtained from radiographs of the spine that happen to include the shoulder in adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.19.00296DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7515481PMC
October 2019

Safe Zones for Cerclage Wiring of the Humeral Diaphysis.

Clin Anat 2020 May 23;33(4):552-557. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Cerclage wiring of the humeral diaphysis entails particular danger to the radial nerve and the deep brachial artery. We sought to delineate safe zones for minimally invasive cerclage wiring of the humeral diaphysis, specifically in relation to the radial nerve and accompanying vasculature. Cerclage wires were percutaneously inserted into three groups of fresh-frozen cadaveric humeri. Group 1-proximal midshaft humerus at 30% of humeral height (n = 4); Group 2-midshaft spiral groove at 45% of humeral height (n = 4); and Group 3-distal midshaft humerus at 60% of humeral height (n = 4). Subsequently, an extensive surgical exploration of the arteries and nerves around the humerus was performed, noting any disturbance to the vessels or nerves and measuring the distance from the cerclage wire to the radial nerve. Neurovascular structures were injured in 75% of specimens when the cerclage wire was inserted at the level of the spiral groove. Both posterior structures, e.g. the radial nerve and the deep brachial artery, and medial structures, e.g., the median nerve and brachial artery, were incarcerated. Application of the cerclage at 30% or 60% of humeral height did not cause neurovascular injury. Minimally invasive application of the cerclage wire at the spiral groove, which is at 45% of humeral height, is likely to cause injury to neurovascular structures. Application of the cerclage at the proximal or distal midshaft humeral areas is associated with less risk of such injury. Clin. Anat. 33:552-557, 2020. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ca.23433DOI Listing
May 2020

Performance of PROMIS Global-10 to Legacy Instruments in Patients With Lateral Epicondylitis.

Arthroscopy 2019 03 21;35(3):770-774. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To validate the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Global-10 for patients who have lateral epicondylitis requiring surgical treatment in comparison with other gold standard patient-reported outcomes.

Methods: Sixty-two patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow were prospectively enrolled before arthroscopic treatment. Inclusion criteria were patients 18 years of age or older with a diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis. Each patient completed the PROMIS Global-10, EuroQol 5 Dimension (EQ-5D), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) assessment form, Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS), and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score (QuickDASH). Spearman correlations were calculated. Bland-Altman agreement tests were conducted between estimated EQ-5D scores from the PROMIS-10 and actual EQ-5D scores.

Results: Correlation between the PROMIS-10 and the EQ-5D was excellent (0.72, P < .0001). Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement for estimated EQ-5D scores ranged from 0.33 below to 0.21 above actual EQ-5D scores. Correlation of the PROMIS-10 physical score was good to excellent with MEPS (0.61, P < .0001) and QuickDASH scores (0.64, P < .0001) and good with the ASES (0.58, P < .0001). Correlation of the PROMIS mental scores was good with QuickDASH (0.50, P < .0001) and poor with ASES (0.26, P = .0492) and MEPS (0.37, P = .0038).

Conclusions: The PROMIS Global-10 physical scores showed good to excellent correlation with gold standard patient-reported outcome instruments, demonstrating it is a reliable tool for outcome assessment in populations with lateral epicondylitis. Despite the excellent correlation with the EQ-5D, the 95% limit of agreement and high variability among the estimated EQ-5D scores derived from the PROMIS-10 suggests that the PROMIS-10 cannot be used as a substitute for actual EQ-5D scores to derive quality-adjusted life years for economic evaluations and cost-effectiveness research.

Level Of Evidence: Level II, development of diagnostic criteria on the basis of consecutive patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.09.019DOI Listing
March 2019

Humeral Head Ossification Predicts Peak Height Velocity Timing and Percentage of Growth Remaining in Children.

J Pediatr Orthop 2018 Oct;38(9):e546-e550

Departments of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

Background: Understanding skeletal maturity is important in the management of idiopathic scoliosis. Iliac apophysis, triradiate cartilage, hand, and calcaneal ossification patterns have previously been described to assess both peak height velocity (PHV) and percent growth remaining; however, these markers may not be present on standard spine radiographs. The purpose of this study was to describe a novel maturity assessment method based on proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification patterns.

Methods: Ninety-four children were followed at least annually throughout growth with serial radiographs and physical examinations. The PHV of each child was determined by measuring the change in height observed at each visit and adjusting for the interval between visits. Percent growth remaining was determined by comparing current to final standing height. The humeral head periphyseal ossification was grouped into stages by 8 investigators ranging from medical student to attending surgeon.

Results: The morphologic changes involving the proximal humeral physis were categorized into 5 stages based on development of the humeral head epiphysis and fusion of the lateral margin of the physis. Our novel classification scheme was well distributed around the PHV and reliably correlated with age of peak growth and percent growth remaining with >70% nonoverlapping interquartile ranges. Furthermore, the scheme was extremely reliable with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.95 for intraobserver and interobserver comparisons, respectively.

Conclusions: The humeral head classification system described here was strongly correlated with age of PHV as well as percentage growth remaining. Furthermore, the staging system was extremely reliable in both interobserver and intraobserver correlations suggesting that it can be easily generalized.

Clinical Relevance: As a view of the humeral head is almost always present on standard scoliosis spine x-ray at our institution, our classification can be easily adapted by surgeons to gain additional insight into skeletal maturity of patients with scoliosis. We believe that our method will significantly improve the evaluation of the child with scoliosis without increasing radiation exposure, time, or cost.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPO.0000000000001232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6135469PMC
October 2018