Publications by authors named "Josep M de Anta"

4 Publications

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The PLAU P141L single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with collateral circulation in patients with coronary artery disease.

Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2014 Jul 4;67(7):552-7. Epub 2014 Apr 4.

Unidad de Anatomía y Embriología Humanas, Departamento de Patología y Terapéutica Experimental, Facultad de Medicina, Campus de Ciencias de la Salud de Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

Introduction And Objectives: Urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which is encoded by the PLAU gene, plays a prominent role during collateral arterial growth. We investigated whether the PLAU P141L (C > T) polymorphism, which causes a mutation in the kringle domain of the protein, is associated with coronary collateral circulation in a cohort of 676 patients with coronary artery disease.

Methods: The polymorphism was genotyped in blood samples using a TaqMan-based genotyping assay, and collateral circulation was assessed by the Rentrop method. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted by clinically relevant variables to estimate odds ratios were used to examine associations of PLAU P141L allelic variants and genotypes with collateral circulation.

Results: Patients with poor collateral circulation (Rentrop 0-1; n = 547) showed a higher frequency of the TT genotype than those with good collateral circulation (Rentrop 2-3; n = 129; P = .020). The T allele variant was also more common in patients with poor collateral circulation (P = .006). The odds ratio of having poorly developed collaterals in patients bearing the T allele (adjusted for clinically relevant variables) was statistically significant under the dominant model (odds ratio = 1.83 [95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.90]; P = .010) and the additive model (odds ratio = 1.73 [95% confidence interval, 1.14-2.62]; P = .009).

Conclusions: An association was found between coronary collateral circulation and the PLAU P141L polymorphism. Patients with the 141L variant are at greater risk of developing poor coronary collateral circulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rec.2013.11.022DOI Listing
July 2014

The DNA damage checkpoint is activated during residual tumour cell survival to methotrexate treatment as an initial step of acquired drug resistance.

Anticancer Drugs 2006 Nov;17(10):1171-7

Cellular and Molecular Biology Unit, Municipal Institute of Medical Research, Barcelona, and Research Unit, University Hospital of Canarias, Tenerife, Spain.

In the process of acquired drug resistance, the absence of tumour cell subpopulations already resistant before treatment implies an initial adaptive stage of cell growth following drug exposure that, under the selective pressure of the drug, allows the emergence of stably resistant cell variants. Here, we show that p53-defective HT-29 colon cancer cells overcome methotrexate-induced cell death owing to DNA damage checkpoint-mediated cell survival at the adaptive stage that precedes stable resistance acquisition. HT-29 cell cycle progression was dramatically delayed in the presence of a lethal dose of methotrexate, leading to DNA damage during S-phase transition and to cell death as treated cells progressed to G2 and M phases. As a result, the DNA damage checkpoint was induced as indicated by the presence of activated phosphorylated forms of checkpoint proteins Chk1 and Rad9. As we recently described, in-vitro resistance to methotrexate occurs without cell subpopulations already resistant before treatment, hence resistance is acquired through a multistep process that includes an early stage of transient cell survival. Our present results showed that this acute cell survival stage was due to a minor percentage of cells that could complete the first division cycle after drug exposure. Cell survival was enhanced by drug withdrawal during S-phase transition and suppressed if drug withdrawal was followed by treatment with the checkpoint-inhibitor drug caffeine. These results thus point to checkpoint-mediated transient adaptation as a target to prevent the emergence of acquired resistance to methotrexate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.cad.0000236311.73703.d2DOI Listing
November 2006

Methotrexate resistance in vitro is achieved by a dynamic selectionprocess of tumor cell variants emerging during treatment.

Int J Cancer 2006 Oct;119(7):1607-15

Unitat de Biologia Cellular i Molecular, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica, Barcelona, Spain.

Genetic instability leads to tumor heterogeneity, which in turn provides a source of cell variants responsible for drug resistance. However, the source of resistant cells during the process of acquired resistance is poorly understood. Our aim has been to characterize the mechanism by which acquired resistance to methotrexate emerges during the course of cancer cell treatment in vitro. We recently demonstrated that, in vitro, HT-29 colon cancer cells become transiently sensitive to methotrexate by depleting the extracellular milieu of survival factors; on the other hand, the cell population under treatment can reversibly adapt to grow below a critical cell density in the presence of the drug. Here, we show that this adapted cell population gives rise to permanent resistant populations through repeated cycles of cell death and growth. This increased cell turnover, but not merely cell proliferation, is required for the appearance of increasing degrees of stable resistance that are progressively selected by drug pressure. Such a process, taking place in multiple steps, is here designated "dynamic selection." The analysis of sensitive and resistant HT-29 cell populations revealed that methotrexate induces genomic instability--characterized by centrosome amplification and aberrant chromosome recombination--leading to a low-level amplification of the 5q chromosome arm as one of the earliest genetic events selected during treatment. Therefore, this model provides a mechanism by which a tumor cell population lacking resistant subpopulations before treatment is able to acquire the genetic changes required for stable drug resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22028DOI Listing
October 2006

Low tumor cell density environment yields survival advantage of tumor cells exposed to MTX in vitro.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2005 Jan 4;1721(1-3):98-106. Epub 2004 Nov 4.

Unitat de Biologia Cellular i Molecular, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica, C/Dr. Aiguader, 80, 08003, Barcelona, Spain.

Stable resistance to methotrexate has been well characterized after prolonged treatment of the HT-29 colon cancer cell line, but the mechanism of cell survival at the early stages of the drug resistance process still remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that human cancer cells in vitro are sensitive to methotrexate only above a critical cell culture density, which specifically coincides with their ability to deplete the extracellular nucleosides from a fully supplemented culture medium. At lower cell densities, extracellular nucleosides remain intact and allow salvage nucleotide synthesis that renders cells insensitive to the drug. Consistently, medium conditioned by cells seeded at standard cell densities sensitizes low cell density cultures. Extracellular nucleosides are the determinants of sensitivity because the latter effect can be mimicked with the use of inhibitors of nucleoside cellular import and reversed by supplying exogenous thymidine and hypoxanthine. Interestingly, treatment at a sensitizing cell density does not preclude the survival of less than 1% of the cells--which have no intrinsic resistance--owing to the inability of the dying cell population to condition the culture medium; this population thus survives indefinitely to continuous treatment by keeping adapted to a low cell number. This cell density-dependent adaptive process accounts for the initial steps of in vitro resistance to methotrexate (MTX) and provides a novel mechanistic insight into the cell population dynamics of cell survival and cell death during drug treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbagen.2004.10.006DOI Listing
January 2005