Publications by authors named "Josefina M B Motti"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ancient and modern mitogenomes from Central Argentina: new insights into population continuity, temporal depth and migration in South America.

Hum Mol Genet 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades, Departamento de Antropología, Córdoba, Argentina.

The inverted triangle shape of South America places Argentina territory as a geographical crossroads between the two principal peopling streams that followed either the Pacific or the Atlantic coasts, which could have then merged in Central Argentina. Although the genetic diversity from this region is therefore crucial to decipher past population movements in South America, its characterization has been overlooked so far. We report 92 modern and 22 ancient mitogenomes spanning a temporal range of 5000 years, which were compared to a large set of previously reported data. Leveraging this dataset representative of the mitochondrial diversity of the subcontinent, we investigate the maternal history of Central Argentina populations within a wider geographical context. We describe a large number of novel clades within the mitochondrial DNA tree, thus providing new phylogenetic interpretations for South America. We also identify several local clades of great temporal depth with continuity until present that stem directly from the founder haplotypes, suggesting that they originated in the region and expanded from there. Moreover, the presence of lineages characteristic of other South American regions reveals the existence of gene flow to Central Argentina. Finally, we report some lineages with discontinuous distribution across the Americas, which suggest the persistence of relic lineages likely linked to the first population arrivals. The present study represents to date the most exhaustive attempt to elaborate a Native American genetic map from modern and ancient complete mitochondrial genomes in Argentina and provides relevant information about the general process of settlement in South America.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddab105DOI Listing
April 2021

Continental Origin for Q Haplogroup Patrilineages in Argentina and Paraguay.

Hum Biol 2021 02;92(2):63-80

Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Celular (IMBICE), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la Republica Argentina (CONICET)-Comisión de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC)-Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), La Plata, Argentina,

Haplogroup Q originated in Eurasia around 30,000 years ago. It is present in Y-chromosomes from Asia and Europe at rather low frequencies. Since America is undoubtedly one of the continents where this haplogroup is highly represented, it has been defined as one of the founding haplogroups. Its M3 clade has been early described as the most frequent, with pan-American representation. However, it was also possible to find several other haplogroup Q clades at low frequencies. Numerous mutations have been described for haplogroup Q, allowing analysis of its variability and assignment of its geographic origin. We have analyzed 442 samples of unrelated men from Argentina and Paraguay belonging to haplogroup Q; here we report specifically on 27 Q (xM3) lineages. We tested 3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by amplified product-length polymorphism (APLP) analysis, 3 SNPs for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 15 SNPs by Sanger sequencing, and 17 short tandem repeats (STRs). Our approach allowed us to identify five subhaplogroups. Q-M3 and Q-CTS2730/Z780 are undoubtedly autochthonous lineages and represent the most frequent subhaplogroups, with significant representation in self-defined aboriginal populations, and their autochthonous status has been previously described. The aim of present work was to identify the continental origin of the remaining Q lineages. Thus, we analyzed the STR haplotypes for the samples and compared them with haplotypes described by other authors for the rest of the world. Even when haplogroup Q lineages have been extensively studied in America, some of them could have their origin in post-Columbian human migration from Europe and Middle East.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.13110/humanbiology.92.2.01DOI Listing
February 2021

Ancient genomes in South Patagonia reveal population movements associated with technological shifts and geography.

Nat Commun 2020 08 3;11(1):3868. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Archaeological research documents major technological shifts among people who have lived in the southern tip of South America (South Patagonia) during the last thirteen millennia, including the development of marine-based economies and changes in tools and raw materials. It has been proposed that movements of people spreading culture and technology propelled some of these shifts, but these hypotheses have not been tested with ancient DNA. Here we report genome-wide data from 20 ancient individuals, and co-analyze it with previously reported data. We reveal that immigration does not explain the appearance of marine adaptations in South Patagonia. We describe partial genetic continuity since ~6600 BP and two later gene flows correlated with technological changes: one between 4700-2000 BP that affected primarily marine-based groups, and a later one impacting all <2000 BP groups. From ~2200-1200 BP, mixture among neighbors resulted in a cline correlated to geographic ordering along the coast.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17656-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7400565PMC
August 2020

Fine-scale genomic analyses of admixed individuals reveal unrecognized genetic ancestry components in Argentina.

PLoS One 2020 16;15(7):e0233808. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Departamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Similarly to other populations across the Americas, Argentinean populations trace back their genetic ancestry into African, European and Native American ancestors, reflecting a complex demographic history with multiple migration and admixture events in pre- and post-colonial times. However, little is known about the sub-continental origins of these three main ancestries. We present new high-throughput genotyping data for 87 admixed individuals across Argentina. This data was combined to previously published data for admixed individuals in the region and then compared to different reference panels specifically built to perform population structure analyses at a sub-continental level. Concerning the Native American ancestry, we could identify four Native American components segregating in modern Argentinean populations. Three of them are also found in modern South American populations and are specifically represented in Central Andes, Central Chile/Patagonia, and Subtropical and Tropical Forests geographic areas. The fourth component might be specific to the Central Western region of Argentina, and it is not well represented in any genomic data from the literature. As for the European and African ancestries, we confirmed previous results about origins from Southern Europe, Western and Central Western Africa, and we provide evidences for the presence of Northern European and Eastern African ancestries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233808PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365470PMC
September 2020

Population structure in Argentina.

PLoS One 2018 1;13(5):e0196325. Epub 2018 May 1.

Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States.

We analyzed 391 samples from 12 Argentinian populations from the Center-West, East and North-West regions with the Illumina Human Exome Beadchip v1.0 (HumanExome-12v1-A). We did Principal Components analysis to infer patterns of populational divergence and migrations. We identified proportions and patterns of European, African and Native American ancestry and found a correlation between distance to Buenos Aires and proportion of Native American ancestry, where the highest proportion corresponds to the Northernmost populations, which is also the furthest from the Argentinian capital. Most of the European sources are from a South European origin, matching historical records, and we see two different Native American components, one that spreads all over Argentina and another specifically Andean. The highest percentages of African ancestry were in the Center West of Argentina, where the old trade routes took the slaves from Buenos Aires to Chile and Peru. Subcontinentaly, sources of this African component are represented by both West Africa and groups influenced by the Bantu expansion, the second slightly higher than the first, unlike North America and the Caribbean, where the main source is West Africa. This is reasonable, considering that a large proportion of the ships arriving at the Southern Hemisphere came from Mozambique, Loango and Angola.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0196325PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5929549PMC
August 2018

The mitochondrial DNA history of a former native American village in northern Uruguay.

Am J Hum Biol 2015 May-Jun;27(3):407-16. Epub 2014 Dec 3.

Departamento de Antropología Biológica, Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.

Objectives: In 1828, between 8,000 and 15,000 Indians from the Jesuit Missions were brought to Uruguay. There, they were settled in a village, presently named Bella Unión, in the northwest corner of the country. According to historic sources, the Indians abandoned the settlement shortly thereafter, with the village subsequently repopulated by "criollos" and immigrants from abroad. As a first approach to reconstruct the genetic history of the population, data about the living population genetic structure will be used. Based on the analysis of the maternal lineages of the inhabitants of Bella Unión, and of those from two nearby villages, we expect to partially answer what happened with the first and subsequent inhabitants.

Methods: We analyzed the maternal lineages of the present inhabitants of Bella Unión and neighboring localities through the sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA control region.

Results: A total of 64.3%, 5.7%, and 30% of the mtDNAs were of Native, African, and West Eurasian origin, respectively. These figures are quite similar to that of the population of Tacuarembó, which is located in northeastern Uruguay. The four main Native American founding haplogroups were detected, with B2 being the most frequent, while some rare subhaplogroups (B2h, C1b2, D1f1) were also found. When compared with other Native American sequences, near- matches most consistently pointed to an Amazonian Indian origin which, when considered with historical evidence, suggested a probable Guaraní-Missionary-related origin.

Conclusions: The data support the existence of a relationship between the historic and present inhabitants of the extreme northwest Uruguay, with a strong contribution of Native Americans to the mitochondrial DNA diversity observed there.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.22667DOI Listing
January 2016

An alternative model for the early peopling of southern South America revealed by analyses of three mitochondrial DNA haplogroups.

PLoS One 2012 10;7(9):e43486. Epub 2012 Sep 10.

Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.

After several years of research, there is now a consensus that America was populated from Asia through Beringia, probably at the end of the Pleistocene. But many details such as the timing, route(s), and origin of the first settlers remain uncertain. In the last decade genetic evidence has taken on a major role in elucidating the peopling of the Americas. To study the early peopling of South America, we sequenced the control region of mitochondrial DNA from 300 individuals belonging to indigenous populations of Chile and Argentina, and also obtained seven complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. We identified two novel mtDNA monophyletic clades, preliminarily designated B2l and C1b13, which together with the recently described D1g sub-haplogroup have locally high frequencies and are basically restricted to populations from the extreme south of South America. The estimated ages of D1g and B2l, about ~15,000 years BP, together with their similar population dynamics and the high haplotype diversity shown by the networks, suggests that they probably appeared soon after the arrival of the first settlers and agrees with the dating of the earliest archaeological sites in South America (Monte Verde, Chile, 14,500 BP). One further sub-haplogroup, D4h3a5, appears to be restricted to Fuegian-Patagonian populations and reinforces our hypothesis of the continuity of the current Patagonian populations with the initial founders. Our results indicate that the extant native populations inhabiting South Chile and Argentina are a group which had a common origin, and suggest a population break between the extreme south of South America and the more northern part of the continent. Thus the early colonization process was not just an expansion from north to south, but also included movements across the Andes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0043486PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3438176PMC
May 2013

Software for Y-haplogroup predictions: a word of caution.

Int J Legal Med 2011 Jan 15;125(1):143-7. Epub 2010 Jan 15.

Laboratorio de Genética Molecular Poblacional, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Celular (IMBICE), CICPBA, CCT, La Plata-CONICET, Argentina.

The development of online software designed for genetic studies has been exponentially growing, providing numerous benefits to the scientific community. However, they should be used with care, since some require adjustments. The efficiency of two programs for haplogroup prediction was tested with 119 samples of known haplotypes and haplogroups from Argentine populations. Quantitative estimates of the predictive quality of both software systems were computed with the uncertainty coefficient; and sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative likelihood ratios were also calculated to assert the reliability of both programs, showing high probabilities of assigning an incorrect haplogroup.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-009-0404-1DOI Listing
January 2011