Publications by authors named "Josefin Paulsson"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Activation of basophils is a new and sensitive marker of biocompatibility in hemodialysis.

Artif Organs 2014 Nov 9;38(11):945-53. Epub 2014 Apr 9.

Unit of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

The hemodialysis procedure involves contact between peripheral blood and the surface of dialyzer membranes, which may lead to alterations in the pathways of innate and adaptive immunity. We aimed to study the effect of blood-membrane interaction on human peripheral basophils and neutrophils in hemodialysis with high- and low-permeability polysulfone dialyzers. The surface expression of CD203c (basophil selection marker) and CD63 (activation marker) after activation by the bacterial peptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or anti-Fcε receptor I (FcεRI) antibody and the absolute number of basophils was investigated before and after hemodialysis with each of the dialyzers. Moreover, the expression on neutrophils of CD11b, the CD11b active epitope, and CD88 was analyzed in the same groups of individuals. The expression of CD63 in basophils following activation by fMLP was significantly higher in the patient group compared with that in healthy controls, but no differences were observed after activation by anti-FcεRI. During the hemodialysis procedure, the low-flux membrane induced up-regulation of CD63 expression on basophils, while passage through the high-flux membrane did not significantly alter the responsiveness. In addition, the absolute number of basophils was unchanged after hemodialysis with either of the dialyzers and compared with healthy controls. We found no significant differences in the expression of the neutrophil activation markers (CD11b, the active epitope of CD11b, and CD88) comparing the two different dialyzers before and after dialysis and healthy controls. Together, these findings suggest that alterations in basophil activity may be a useful marker of membrane bioincompatibility in hemodialysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aor.12297DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257079PMC
November 2014

Leukocyte proliferation and immune modulator production in patients with chronic kidney disease.

PLoS One 2013 9;8(8):e73141. Epub 2013 Aug 9.

Unit of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Introduction: In Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), immune cells are affected by uremic retention toxins. Given this effect, we analyzed lymphocyte proliferative response and immune modulators production following in vitro stimulation.

Methods: Whole blood was drawn from healthy controls, patients with eGFR <20 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (Pre-dialysis, CKD stages 4 and 5) and hemodialysis patients (stage 5D). Peripheral cells were incubated for six days with pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A, Staphylococcus enterotoxin A or influenza A vaccine. Peripheral lymphocyte proliferation was then analyzed by the "Flow-cytometric Assay of Specific Cell-mediated Immune response in Activated whole blood" (FASCIA) method, and cytokine profile in the cell supernatants was analyzed by the Milliplex multi-array method.

Results: The absolute number of lymphoblasts in response to mitogenic stimulation and the number of cells in each CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulation were similar comparing the three groups, except for a single decline in number of lymphoblasts after stimulation with Staphylococcus enterotoxin A, comparing dialysis patients with healthy controls. Levels of interleukin (IL)-2 (p=0.026), -10 (p=0.019) and -15 (p=0.027) in the Staphylococcus enterotoxin A-stimulated supernatant were lower in hemodialysis patients compared to healthy controls. Levels of IL-15 (p=0.017) from pre-dialysis patients and levels of IL-5 (p=0.019) from hemodialysis patients in influenza A vaccine-stimulated supernatants were also lower compared to controls. In pokeweed mitogen-stimulated supernatant, IL-2 levels (p=0.013) were lower in hemodialysis patients compared to pre-dialysis patients. TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-8, MCP-1, IP-10, IFN-α2, IL-1α and eotaxin levels were all significantly higher in plasma obtained from CKD patients.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that T-cells from CKD patients have similar proliferative response to stimulation compared with healthy individuals. Moreover, however the immune cells show inability to produce selected cytokines, most likely due to the uremic milieu or dialysis procedure.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0073141PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3739766PMC
March 2014

Activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in monocytes derived from chronic kidney disease patients.

PLoS One 2013 23;8(7):e68937. Epub 2013 Jul 23.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Experimental Cancer Medicine-Clinical Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have significantly increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infections and cardiovascular diseases. Since monocytes play an essential role in host immunity, this study was directed to explore the gene expression profile in order to identify differences in activated pathways in monocytes relevant to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and increased susceptibility to infections. Monocytes from CKD patients (stages 4 and 5, estimated GFR <20 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and healthy donors were collected from peripheral blood. Microarray gene expression profile was performed and data were interpreted by GeneSpring software and by PANTHER tool. Western blot was done to validate the pathway members. The results demonstrated that 600 and 272 genes were differentially up- and down regulated respectively in the patient group. Pathways involved in the inflammatory response were highly expressed and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was the most significant pathway expressed in the patient group. Since this pathway has been attributed to a variety of inflammatory manifestations, the current findings may contribute to dysfunctional monocytes in CKD patients. Strategies to interfere with this pathway may improve host immunity and prevent cardiovascular complications in CKD patients.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0068937PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3720736PMC
March 2014

Expression of neutrophil SOD2 is reduced after lipopolysaccharide stimulation: a potential cause of neutrophil dysfunction in chronic kidney disease.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2011 Jul 2;26(7):2195-201. Epub 2010 Nov 2.

Department of Nephrology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.

Background: Neutrophils from patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are dysfunctional and thus a contributing factor to the risk of infections. The mechanisms for leucocyte dysfunction in CKD are not fully understood. It is known that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates transcription of several genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines. We therefore aimed to study the effect of LPS on neutrophil expression of genes related to the inflammatory response to address the hypothesis that LPS-induced gene transcriptions are altered in CKD patients.

Methods: We analysed gene expression of LPS-stimulated neutrophils from 30 patients with CKD and 15 healthy controls. Superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), IL1A, IL-1R1, IL-1R2 and IL8RA gene expression from both neutrophils and differentiated HL60 cells were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Differentiated HL60 cells were stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-7-acetate (PMA) after inhibition of SOD2 by small interfering RNA followed by respiratory burst assessment using flow cytometry.

Results: LPS stimulation induced a significant mobilization of CD11b on neutrophils from CKD and healthy controls. Upregulation of SOD2, IL1A, IL-1R1 and IL-1R2 gene expression in neutrophils from healthy controls after LPS stimulation was contrasted by no change in gene transcription (IL-1R1 and IL-1R2) or even a downregulation in patients with CKD (SOD2 and IL1A). Inhibition of SOD2 reduced the PMA-induced respiratory burst and IL1A, IL-1R1, IL-1R2 and IL8RA gene expression in neutrophil-differentiated HL60 cells.

Conclusions: Because of the critical role of SOD2 in the generation of hydrogen peroxide during phagocytosis, downregulation of SOD2 gene expression after LPS stimulation in neutrophils from patients with CKD indicates a potential mechanism for neutrophil dysfunction and cytokine dysregulation in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq673DOI Listing
July 2011

Neutrophil activation during transmigration in vivo and in vitro A translational study using the skin chamber model.

J Immunol Methods 2010 Sep 5;361(1-2):82-8. Epub 2010 Aug 5.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Neutrophil transmigration can be studied in vitro by use of the transwell model and in vivo by the skin chamber model. Activation during transmigration involves translocation of secretory vesicles and granules to the plasma- and phagolysosome membranes. In this study, we compared the skin chamber model with the transwell model, focusing on the mobilization of CR1 (CD35), CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CD63 from intracellular vesicles and granules. In addition, functional responses towards a bacterial related stimulus, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), in terms of CR3 expression and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed. Discrepancies between the skin chamber model and the transwell model were observed. The expression of CR1 increased following in vivo transmigration (p<0.001) and, in contrast, decreased following in vitro transmigration (p=0.004). Furthermore, CR1 was mobilized following an isolation procedure included in the transwell model. The expression of CR3 increased following both in vivo (p<0.001) and in vitro (p=0.03) transmigration. However, in vitro transmigration did not influence the fMLP induced CR3 expression which was significantly increased following in vivo transmigration (p=0.01). In addition, the fMLP induced production of ROS was significantly reduced following in vitro transmigration (p=0.002) but unaltered after in vivo transmigration, indicating differences between the impact of the two systems on cellular activation. The observed discrepancies between the two models might be partly explained by granule mobilization and neutrophil priming, induced during the isolation procedure included in the transwell model, which results in an altered cellular activation. Therefore, mobilization of granules needs to be accounted for when interpreting data from different model systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jim.2010.07.015DOI Listing
September 2010

Monocyte and neutrophil chemotactic activity at the site of interstitial inflammation in patients on high-flux hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration.

Blood Purif 2009 27;28(1):47-52. Epub 2009 Mar 27.

Department of Nephrology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.

Background/aims: We have observed a difference between patients on low-flux hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis and patients on hemodiafiltration (HDF) or high-flux HD in the capacity of transmigrated leukocytes to mobilize CD11b in response to inflammatory stimuli compared with healthy subjects. This could be due to different interstitial chemokine concentrations.

Methods: We measured concentrations of circulating and interstitial macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in 10 patients on HDF or high-flux HD and 11 healthy subjects by using immunoassay.

Results: The interstitial concentrations of MIP-1 alpha, MMP-9/NGAL and IL-8 were similar in patients and healthy subjects, while the corresponding concentration of MCP-1 was significantly higher in patients on HDF or high-flux HD as compared with healthy subjects (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: We suggest that an equal or higher concentration of chemokines in the interstitium in patients with HDF or high-flux HD might be one mechanism responsible for the preserved function of transmigrated leukocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000210037DOI Listing
September 2009

Functional corpora lutea are formed in matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor-treated plasminogen-deficient mice.

Endocrinology 2007 Mar 22;148(3):1226-34. Epub 2006 Nov 22.

Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.

Corpus luteum (CL) formation involves dramatic tissue remodeling and angiogenesis. To determine the functional roles of the plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) systems in these processes, we have studied CL formation and function in plasminogen (plg)-deficient mice, with or without treatment with the broad-spectrum synthetic MMP inhibitor galardin. Both the adult pseudopregnant CL model and the gonadotropin-primed immature mouse model were used. We found that CL formed normally not only in plasminogen-deficient mice and in galardin-treated wild-type mice, but also in galardin-treated plg-deficient mice, suggesting that neither of the plasminogen activator and MMP systems is essential for CL formation. Nevertheless, in plg-deficient mice, serum progesterone levels were reduced by approximately 50%, and the progesterone levels were not reduced further by galardin treatment. When CL from plg-deficient mice were stained for several molecular markers for CL development and regression, they appeared healthy and vascularized, and were indistinguishable from CL from wild-type mice. This implies that the reduced progesterone levels were not caused by impaired CL formation. Taken together, our data suggest that neither plasmin nor MMPs, alone or in combination, are required for CL formation. Therefore, the tissue remodeling and angiogenesis processes during CL formation may be mediated by redundant protease systems. However, the reduced serum progesterone levels in plg-deficient mice suggest that plasmin, but not MMPs, plays a role in maintenance of luteal function. This role may be performed through proteolytic activation of growth factors and other paracrine factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2006-0669DOI Listing
March 2007

Activation of peripheral and in vivo transmigrated neutrophils in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

Atherosclerosis 2007 Jun 11;192(2):328-34. Epub 2006 Sep 11.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Accumulating evidence support a role of neutrophils in coronary artery disease (CAD). However little is known about the action of neutrophils at a local inflammatory site represented by an atherosclerotic plaque. To gain insight into these issues, we applied a skin blister model that permits analyses of in vivo transmigrated neutrophils. We hypothesised that the chronic inflammation in stable CAD mediates priming of neutrophils that impacts the out-come of neutrophil action at an inflammatory site. Thirteen patients with angiographically verified CAD were eligible for study entry together with 13 age and sex matched controls. Markers of inflammation (IL-6 and CRP), neutrophil activation (IL-8 and MMP-9/NGAL), and functional aspects (CD11b up-regulation and intracellular H(2)O(2) production) of peripheral and in vivo transmigrated neutrophils were studied. Systemic IL-8 and MMP-9/NGAL concentrations were significantly increased in patients indicating a primed state in circulating neutrophils. In vivo transmigrated neutrophils in stable CAD patients had an increased propensity to release MMP-9/NGAL and a reduced capacity to up-regulate CD11b and to produce hydrogen peroxide. These aberrations at the inflammatory site may be a consequence of a primed state of circulating neutrophils and point towards potential mechanisms whereby neutrophils at a local inflammatory site may contribute to the pathogenesis of CAD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2006.08.003DOI Listing
June 2007
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