Publications by authors named "José Neuman Miranda Neiva"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dietary nutrient restrictions in the post-weaning period change Santa Inês ewe lamb nutritional metabolic profile.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2021 Jun 14;53(3):359. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Animal Science Department, Federal University of Tocantins, BR-153, Km 112, s/no, Caixa Postal 132, 77.804-970, Araguaina, Tocantins, Brazil.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic profile of Santa Inês ewe lambs fed diets for early or late-maturing diets with or without nutrient restrictions. The experiment consisted of a 2 × 2 completely randomized factorial experiment with either early- or late-maturity feed formulation according to "Nutrient Requirements of Small Ruminants" with or without 15% crude protein (CP) and total digestible nutrients (TDN) restrictions in diets formulated, five replications, and 20 ewe lambs averaging 15.1±2.6 kg. Lambs on early-maturity diets consumed greater (P<0.05) dietary ether extract (EE), non-fibrous carbohydrates, and TDN than those on late-maturity diets. Lambs on early-maturity diets had 7.11% greater dry matter digestibility (DMD) compared to lambs fed late-maturity diets. Lambs fed late-maturity diets, in general, had greater intake (IN), excreted (EN), and retained (RN) N as well as greater RN/IN and EN/IN ratios. There were no differences in blood total protein or albumin among lambs fed for different finishing maturity targets. Diets designed for late-maturing lambs resulted in greater microbial N and CP as well as rumen and metabolizable, degradable, and undegradable rumen and metabolizable CP. The selection of diets for early or late maturity carcasses depends on the production system goals. Diets without restrictions are recommended for early-maturity carcass finishing while diets with 15% CP and TDN restriction are recommend for late-maturity finishing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-021-02767-3DOI Listing
June 2021

Effects of increasing nitrogen levels in Mombasa grass on pasture characteristics, chemical composition, and beef cattle performance in the humid tropics of the Amazon.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2020 Nov 25;52(6):3293-3300. Epub 2020 Jul 25.

Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil.

Improving beef cattle production in pasture-based systems without expanding agricultural land has been the focus of several studies over the last decades. Nitrogen fertilization is one of the available strategies with high potential to optimize cattle performance in tropical systems. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of increasing nitrogen levels (150, 300, and 450 kg ha of N year) in Megathyrsus maximus cv. Mombasa in the humid tropics of the Amazon. The following parameters were evaluated: pasture agronomic characteristics, herbage chemical composition, and beef cattle performance. A total of 24 nine-month-old Nellore bulls with initial mean weight of 173 ± 1.95 kg were used for the performance test. The experimental design was a randomized block with three treatments. Herbage mass and leaf mass contents were increased by the highest nitrogen level (P < 0.05). Nitrogen levels elevated the forage accumulation rate, final leaf blade length, and pre-grazing canopy height(P < 0.05). The crude protein content increased at the highest N level (P < 0.05). The neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber contents decreased with increasing N levels. The stocking rate and total weight gain per hectare were higher in bulls grazing pastures fertilized with 450 compared with 150 kg ha of N year(P < 0.05). The average daily gain was influenced by N levels (P < 0.05). Nitrogen levels at 300 and 450 kg increased animal weight gain and productivity per area by increasing forage yield and improving the chemical composition of Mombasa grass.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-020-02360-0DOI Listing
November 2020

Replacement levels of elephant grass by moist pineapple by-product silage in diets of Santa Inês crossbred sheep: performance and digestibility.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2013 Feb 25;45(2):585-92. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

UFRA, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

The present study evaluated the effect of replacing elephant grass (EG) with moist pineapple by-product silage (PS) on the apparent digestibility, consumption of digestible nutrients and performance of 25 castrated male lambs Santa Ines crossbreds. The lambs had an initial body weight of 20.2 ± 3.5 kg and were housed in individual pens in a completely randomised design with five treatments (replacement of EG by PS at five proportions of 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 %) and five replicates during 74 days. There was no significant effect of PS replacement proportions on the intake of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), total carbohydrates (TC), non-fibrous carbohydrates or total digestible nutrients (TDN). The consumption of crude protein (CP) decreased linearly with the inclusion of PS in the diets. The digestibility of DM, OM and TCs as well as levels of TDN increased linearly with the addition of PS. The use of PS in the diets had no significant effect on the digestibility of CP and neutral detergent fibre corrected for ashes and protein (NDFom(n)). These results demonstrated that there was no difference in the performance of animals fed diets with or without PS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-012-0263-5DOI Listing
February 2013
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