Publications by authors named "José J Pestano"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Isolation and prominent aboriginal maternal legacy in the present-day population of La Gomera (Canary Islands).

Eur J Hum Genet 2015 Sep 19;23(9):1236-43. Epub 2014 Nov 19.

Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain.

The present-day population structure of La Gomera is outstanding in its high aboriginal heritage, the greatest in the Canary Islands. This was earlier confirmed by both mitochondrial DNA and autosomal analyses, although genetic drift due to the fifteenth century European colonization could not be excluded as the main factor responsible. The present mtDNA study of aboriginal remains and extant samples from the six municipal districts of the island indeed demonstrates that the pre-Hispanic colonization of La Gomera by North African people involved a strong founder event, shown by the high frequency of the indigenous Canarian U6b1a lineage in the aboriginal samples (65%). This value is even greater than that observed in the extant population (44%), which in turn is the highest of all the seven Canary Islands. In contrast to previous results obtained for the aboriginal populations of Tenerife and La Palma, haplogroups related to secondary waves of migration were not detected in La Gomera aborigines, indicating that isolation also had an important role in shaping the current population. The rugged relief of La Gomera divided into several distinct valleys probably promoted subsequent aboriginal intra-insular differentiation that has continued after the European colonization, as seen in the present-day population structure observed on the island.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2014.251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4538205PMC
September 2015

The history of the North African mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U6 gene flow into the African, Eurasian and American continents.

BMC Evol Biol 2014 May 19;14:109. Epub 2014 May 19.

Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biology, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain.

Background: Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome analyses have greatly improved the phylogeny and phylogeography of human mtDNA. Human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U6 has been considered as a molecular signal of a Paleolithic return to North Africa of modern humans from southwestern Asia.

Results: Using 230 complete sequences we have refined the U6 phylogeny, and improved the phylogeographic information by the analysis of 761 partial sequences. This approach provides chronological limits for its arrival to Africa, followed by its spreads there according to climatic fluctuations, and its secondary prehistoric and historic migrations out of Africa colonizing Europe, the Canary Islands and the American Continent.

Conclusions: The U6 expansions and contractions inside Africa faithfully reflect the climatic fluctuations that occurred in this Continent affecting also the Canary Islands. Mediterranean contacts drove these lineages to Europe, at least since the Neolithic. In turn, the European colonization brought different U6 lineages throughout the American Continent leaving the specific sign of the colonizers origin.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-14-109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4062890PMC
May 2014

Phylogeography and genetic structure of the Canarian common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) inferred with mtDNA and microsatellite loci.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2009 Nov 24;53(2):556-64. Epub 2009 Jul 24.

Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, E-35080 Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, Spain.

The widespread common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) inhabits five of the seven Canary Islands. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (1002bp) revealed new insights into the systematics and phylogeography of this taxon. Additionally, a set of microsatellite loci were analyzed to examine the structure of these populations. Our results suggest that a new species of the genus Fringilla is present in the Canary Islands, which comprises at least three subspecies, but with a different distribution to that which has been morphologically accepted. The specimens from Gran Canaria are genetically distinct from those of La Gomera and Tenerife (F. c. canariensis), which suggests the existence of an undescribed taxon. Furthermore, nuclear microsatellite data suggest an ongoing incipient speciation process in this population. This study provides both important conservationist implications and a basis for re-evaluating the taxonomic status of the Canarian Fringilla coelebs populations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.07.018DOI Listing
November 2009

Differential effects exerted on human mammary epithelial cells by environmentally relevant organochlorine pesticides either individually or in combination.

Chem Biol Interact 2009 Aug 5;180(3):485-91. Epub 2009 May 5.

Research Group in Environment and Health, Unit of Toxicology, Health Sciences Center, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Instituto Canario de Investigación del Cáncer, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.

Organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been associated with breast cancer development and progression. However, the deleterious mechanisms exerted by these contaminants are yet unclear and need to be further elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a number of OCs (previously detected in human serum from a Spanish population), individually or in combination, on normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at concentrations close to those found in human beings. The results obtained after a 96-h exposure indicated that OCs exert a clear cytotoxic effect on these cells at higher concentrations than those found in human beings. DDT-derivative organochlorines (DDT and its metabolites, DDE and DDD) are individually more cytotoxic than non-DDT-derivative organochlorines (aldrin and dieldrin). On the contrary, combinations of non-DDT organochlorines were clearly more cytotoxic than combinations of DDT-derivative organochlorines at concentrations close to those described in human serum. Additionally, transcriptional regulation arrays showed that the exposure of HMEC to an environmentally relevant mixture of OCs (p,p'-DDD plus p,p'-DDE plus o,p'-DDE plus aldrin plus dieldrin) sharply upregulated the expression of a number of protein kinases genes, such as ACVRL1, ALK-1, KIT, ERBB3, and ALK-1 at concentrations close to those detected in human populations. Taken together, these findings show a detrimental effect of OCs on human breast cells and indicate a possible association between exposure to organochlorine pesticide combinations and the induction of transformation processes in human breast cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2009.04.010DOI Listing
August 2009

Results of the 2003-2004 GEP-ISFG collaborative study on mitochondrial DNA: focus on the mtDNA profile of a mixed semen-saliva stain.

Forensic Sci Int 2006 Jul 21;160(2-3):157-67. Epub 2005 Oct 21.

Instituto Nacional de Toxicología y Ciencias Forenses, Servicio de Biología, Barcelona, Spain.

We report here a review of the seventh mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exercise undertaken by the Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) corresponding to the period 2003-2004. Five reference bloodstains from five donors (M1-M5), a mixed stain of saliva and semen (M6), and a hair sample (M7) were submitted to each participating laboratory for nuclear DNA (nDNA; autosomal STR and Y-STR) and mtDNA analysis. Laboratories were asked to investigate the contributors of samples M6 and M7 among the reference donors (M1-M5). A total of 34 laboratories reported total or partial mtDNA sequence data from both, the reference bloodstains (M1-M5) and the hair sample (M7) concluding a match between mtDNA profiles of M5 and M7. Autosomal STR and Y-STR profiling was the preferred strategy to investigate the contributors of the semen/saliva mixture (M6). Nuclear DNA profiles were consistent with a mixture of saliva from the donor (female) of M4 and semen from donor M5, being the semen (XY) profile the dominant component of the mixture. Strikingly, and in contradiction to the nuclear DNA analysis, mtDNA sequencing results yield a more simple result: only the saliva contribution (M4) was detected, either after preferential lysis or after complete DNA digestion. Some labs provided with several explanations for this finding and carried out additional experiments to explain this apparent contradictory result. The results pointed to the existence of different relative amounts of nuclear and mtDNAs in saliva and semen. We conclude that this circumstance could strongly influence the interpretation of the mtDNA evidence in unbalanced mixtures and in consequence lead to false exclusions. During the GEP-ISFG annual conference a validation study was planned to progress in the interpretation of mtDNA from different mixtures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2005.09.005DOI Listing
July 2006

Mitochondrial DNA error prophylaxis: assessing the causes of errors in the GEP'02-03 proficiency testing trial.

Forensic Sci Int 2005 Mar;148(2-3):191-8

Unidad de Genética, Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Instituto de Medicina Legal, A Coruña, Galicia-Spain.

We report the results of the Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) Collaborative Exercise 2002-2003 on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. Six different samples were submitted to the participating laboratories: four blood stains (M1-M2-M3-M4), one mixture blood sample (M5), and two hair shaft fragments (M6). Most of the labs reported consensus results for the blood stains, slightly improving the results of previous collaborative exercises. Although hair shaft analysis is still carried out by a small number of laboratories, this analysis yielded a high rate of success. On the contrary, the analysis of the mixture blood stain (M5) yielded a lower rate of success; in spite of this, the whole results on M5 typing demonstrated the suitability of mtDNA analysis in mixture samples. We have found that edition errors are among the most common mistakes reported by the different labs. In addition, we have detected contamination events as well as other minor problems, i.e. lack of standarization in nomenclature for punctual and length heteroplasmies, and indels. In the present edition of the GEP-ISFG exercise we have paid special attention to the visual phylogenetic inspection for detecting common sequencing errors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2004.06.008DOI Listing
March 2005

The 2000-2001 GEP-ISFG Collaborative Exercise on mtDNA: assessing the cause of unsuccessful mtDNA PCR amplification of hair shaft samples.

Forensic Sci Int 2003 Jun;134(1):46-53

Comisara General de Policía Científica, Sección de Biología-ADN, Madrid, Spain.

We report the results of Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) Collaborative Exercise 2001-2002 on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. 64 laboratories from Spain, Portugal and several Latin-American countries participated in this quality control exercise. Five samples were sent to the participating laboratories, four blood stains (M1-M4) and a sample (M5) consisting of two hair shaft fragments. M4 was non-human (Felis catus) in origin; therefore, the capacity of the labs to identify the biological source of this sample was an integral part of the exercise. Some labs detected the non-human origin of M4 by carrying out immuno-diffussion techniques using antihuman serum, whereas others identified the specific animal origin by testing the sample against a set of animal antibodies or by means of the analysis of mtDNA regions (Cyt-b, 12S, and 16S genes). The results of the other three human blood stains (M1-M3) improved in relation to the last Collaborative Exercises but those related to hairs yielded a low rate of success which clearly contrasts with previous results. As a consequence of this, some labs performed additional analysis showing that the origin of this low efficiency was not the presence of inhibitors, but the low quantity of DNA present in these specific hair samples and the degradation. As a general conclusion the results emphasize the need of external proficiency testing as part of the accreditation procedure for the labs performing mtDNA analysis in forensic casework.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0379-0738(03)00095-1DOI Listing
June 2003