Publications by authors named "José Gb Derraik"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Uptake and outcome of a community-based healthy lifestyle intervention for preschoolers identified with obesity: an audit of the Whānau Pakari preschool programme.

N Z Med J 2020 10 30;133(1524):135-139. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Senior Research Fellow, Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland; Paediatrician, Department of Paediatrics, Taranaki District Health Board, New Plymouth; Senior Lecturer, Department of Paediatrics: Child and Youth Health, University of Auckland, Auckland; Tamariki Pakari Child Health and Wellbeing Trust, New Plymouth.

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October 2020

Safety, feasibility and efficacy of side-alternating vibration therapy on bone and muscle health in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal disorders: A pilot trial.

J Paediatr Child Health 2020 Aug 21;56(8):1257-1262. Epub 2020 May 21.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Aims: A pilot study was performed to establish the safety, feasibility and efficacy of vibration therapy (VT) on bone and muscle health in children and adolescents with a range of musculoskeletal disorders.

Methods: Seventeen participants (15.7 years ± 2.9 years), with conditions that impacted on their musculoskeletal health, completed 20 weeks of side-alternating VT for 9 min/session, 4 times/week at 20 Hz. Data were collected at baseline and after 20 weeks of intervention. Assessments included whole-body dual-energyX-ray absorptiometry, muscle function (force plate) and 6-min walk test.

Results: Compliance with the prescribed VT training protocol was relatively high overall at 78% and there were no adverse events reported. After 20 weeks intervention, functional assessments showed time taken to perform the chair test was reduced by 15% (P = 0.018), leg balance improved with standard ellipse area decreasing by 88% (P = 0.006) and distance walked in the 6-min walk test improved by 9% (P = 0.002). Participants displayed increased total body mass (1.94 kg; P = 0.018) with increased lean mass (1.20 kg; P = 0.019) but not fat mass (P = 0.19). There was no change in total body bone mineral density (P = 0.44) or bone mineral content (P = 0.07).

Conclusions: Twenty weeks of side-alternating VT was a feasible protocol that was associated with improvements in physical function and no detrimental effects on lean mass, bone mass or density in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14913DOI Listing
August 2020

The importance of rurality data in understanding access to healthcare services for childhood obesity.

N Z Med J 2019 05 3;132(1494):60-63. Epub 2019 May 3.

Senior Research Fellow, Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland; Paediatrician, Department of Paediatrics, Taranaki District Health Board, New Plymouth.

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May 2019

Prevalence of comorbidities in obese New Zealand children and adolescents at enrolment in a community-based obesity programme.

J Paediatr Child Health 2016 Dec 16;52(12):1099-1105. Epub 2016 Sep 16.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics at enrolment of children and adolescents referred to an obesity programme and to determine how the prevalence of comorbidities differed in Indigenous versus non-Indigenous children.

Methods: Participants were residents of a semi-rural region of New Zealand (NZ). Eligibility was defined by a body mass index (BMI) of ≥98th percentile or >91st centile with weight-related comorbidities. Fasting blood, medical and physical assessments were obtained.

Results: During the recruitment period from January 2012 to August 2014, 239 participants, aged 4.8-16.8 years, undertook assessment. Average BMI standard deviation score was 3.09 (standard deviation (SD) = 0.60, range 1.52-5.34 SD). The majority of participants were of either Maori (NZ's indigenous people (45%)) or NZ European (45%) ethnicity; 29% of participants were from the most deprived quintile of household deprivation. Maori participants were more likely than NZ Europeans to have a mother who smoked during pregnancy (52% vs. 28%, P = 0.001), a family history of type 2 diabetes (66% vs. 53%, P = 0.04), acanthosis nigricans on examination (58% vs. 20%, P < 0.0001), a low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (27% vs. 14%, P = 0.03) or high serum triglyceride (38% vs. 24%, P = 0.03) concentration.

Conclusion: The unique aspect of this study was the ability to recruit high levels of Maori participants and those from most deprived areas, indicating a high level of acceptability for these target groups. Comorbidities were prevalent in this cohort of overweight/obese school-aged children. While there were some differences in comorbidity prevalence between Maori and NZ Europeans, the overall clinical picture in our cohort, irrespective of ethnicity, was of concern.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.13315DOI Listing
December 2016

Reply to N Hoem.

Am J Clin Nutr 2016 06;103(6):1558-9

From the Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand (BBA, JGBD, DC-S, PLH; WSC, e-mail: and the Nutraceuticals Research Group, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia (MLG).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.133785DOI Listing
June 2016

Maternal undernutrition and endocrine development.

Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab 2010 Mar;5(2):297-312

c Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand.

Maternal undernutrition, whether it occurs before conception, throughout gestation or during lactation, may lead to physiological adaptations in the fetus that will affect the health of the offspring in adult life. The timing, severity, duration and nature of the maternal nutritional insult may affect the offspring differently. Other factors determining outcome following maternal undernutrition are fetal number and gender. Importantly, effects of maternal undernutrition may be carried over into subsequent generations. This review examines the endocrine pathways disrupted by maternal undernutrition that affect the long-term postnatal health of the offspring. Maternal and childhood undernutrition are highly prevalent in low- and middle-income countries, and, in developed countries, unintentional undernutrition may arise from maternal dieting. It is, therefore, important that we better understand the mechanisms driving the long-term effects of maternal undernutrition, as well as identifying treatments to ameliorate the associated mortality and morbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eem.09.62DOI Listing
March 2010