Publications by authors named "Jorge Rodríguez-Jiménez"

5 Publications

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Myalgia as a symptom at hospital admission by SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated to persistent musculoskeletal pain as long-term post-COVID sequelae: a case-control study.

Pain 2021 Apr 8. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), Madrid. Spain. Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico San Carlos. Madrid, Spain Department of Public Health, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), Madrid. Spain.

Abstract: This study investigated the association between COVID-related myalgia experienced by patients at hospital admission and the presence of post-COVID symptoms. A case-control study including patients hospitalised due to COVID-19 between February 20 and May 31, 2020 was conducted. Patients reporting myalgia and patients without myalgia at hospital admission were scheduled for a telephone interview 7 months after hospital discharge. Hospitalisation and clinical data were collected from medical records. A list of post-COVID symptoms with attention to musculoskeletal pain was evaluated. Anxiety and depressive symptoms, and sleep quality were likewise assessed. From a total 1,200 hospitalised COVID-19 patients, 369 with and 369 without myalgia at hospital admission were assessed 7.2 months (SD 0.6) after hospital discharge. A greater proportion (P=0.03) of patients with myalgia at hospital admission (20%) showed ≥3 post-COVID symptoms when compared with individuals without myalgia (13%). A higher proportion of patients presenting myalgia (OR1.41, 95%CI 1.04-1.90) exhibited musculoskeletal post-COVID pain when compared to those without myalgia. The prevalence of musculoskeletal post-COVID pain in the total sample was 38%. Fifty percent of individuals with pre-existing musculoskeletal pain experienced a worsening of their symptoms after COVID-19. No differences in fatigue, dyspnoea, anxiety/depressive levels or sleep quality were observed between myalgia and non-myalgia groups. The presence of myalgia at hospital admission was associated with pre-existing history of musculoskeletal pain (OR1.62, 95%CI 1.10-2.40). In conclusion, myalgia at the acute phase was associated with musculoskeletal pain as long-term post-COVID sequelae. Additionally, half of patients with pre-existing pain conditions experienced a persistent exacerbation of their previous syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002306DOI Listing
April 2021

Ultrasound Characterization of Patellar Tendon in Non-Elite Sport Players with Painful Patellar Tendinopathy: Absolute Values or Relative Ratios? A Pilot Study.

Diagnostics (Basel) 2020 Oct 29;10(11). Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Department of Radiology, Rehabilitation and Physiotherapy, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

Imaging findings in patellar tendinopathy are questioned. The aim of this pilot study was to characterize ultrasound measures, by calculating ultrasound ratio and neovascularization of the patellar tendon in non-elite sport players with unilateral painful patellar tendinopathy. Cross-sectional area (CSA), width, and thickness of the patellar tendon were assessed bilaterally in 20 non-elite sport-players with unilateral painful patellar tendinopathy and 20 asymptomatic controls by a blinded assessor. Ultrasound ratios were calculated to discriminate between symptomatic and asymptomatic knees. The Ohberg score was used for characterizing neovascularization. We found that non-elite sport players with patellar tendinopathy exhibited bilateral increases in CSA, width, and thickness of the patellar tendon compared to asymptomatic controls (Cohen d > 2). The ability of ultrasound ratios to discriminate between painful and non-painful patellar tendons was excellent (receiver operating characteristic, ROC > 0.9). The best diagnostic value (sensitivity: 100% and specificity: 95%) was observed when a width ratio ≥ 1.29 between the symptomatic and asymptomatic patellar tendon was used as a cut-off. Further, neovascularization was also observed in 70% of non-elite sport players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy. A greater CSA ratio was associated with more related-disability and higher tendon neovascularization. This study reported that non-elite sport players with painful unilateral patellar tendinopathy showed structural ultrasound changes in the patellar tendon when compared with asymptomatic controls. Ultrasound ratios were able to discriminate between symptomatic and asymptomatic knees. Current results suggest that ultrasound ratios could be a useful imaging outcome for identifying changes in the patellar tendon in sport players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10110882DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7694007PMC
October 2020

Women with mechanical neck pain exhibit increased activation of their superficial neck extensors when performing the cranio-cervical flexion test.

Musculoskelet Sci Pract 2020 10 11;49:102222. Epub 2020 Jul 11.

Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Spain; Cátedra Institucional en Docencia, Clínica e Investigación en Fisioterapia: Terapia Manual, Punción Seca y Ejercicio Terapéutico, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain.

Background: Several studies have analysed the activity of superficial neck flexors, but the activity of neck extensors has been less investigated in patients with neck pain OBJECTIVES: 1, to investigate the differences in the activation of superficial neck flexor and extensor musculature during the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT) in women with mechanical chronic neck pain when compared to asymptomatic women; 2, to investigate the correlation between neck muscle activity and the clinical features of neck pain DESIGN: Cross-sectional METHODS: Surface electromyography was recorded bilaterally from the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles of 30 women with mechanical chronic neck pain and 30 asymptomatic women as they performed the CCFT. Comparisons of the normalized root mean square between both groups were conducted with 2x5 ANCOVA with task level as the within-subjects variable, group as the between-subjects variable, and pain related-disability as a co-variate RESULTS: Women with mechanical neck pain exhibited increased activity of superficial neck flexors (sternocleidomastoid: F = 14.448, P < 0.001; anterior scalene: F = 21.693, P < 0.001) and superficial neck extensors (splenius capitis: F = 4.692, P < 0.001; upper trapezius: F = 4.245, P < 0.001) as compared to asymptomatic women. Higher pain related-disability was associated with more electrical activity of the anterior scalene and upper trapezius muscles during the CCFT CONCLUSIONS: Women with mechanical chronic neck pain exhibit an increased activity of their superficial neck flexors and superficial neck extensors during a low-load task such as CCFT when compared to asymptomatic pain-free women. Our results should be considered when designing therapeutic exercise programs for this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msksp.2020.102222DOI Listing
October 2020

Post-needling soreness and trigger point dry needling for hemiplegic shoulder pain following stroke.

Acupunct Med 2020 06 3;38(3):150-157. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Spain.

Objectives: To determine the presence of post-needling induced pain in subjects who had suffered a stroke and received trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN), and to investigate the effects of including TrP-DN into a rehabilitation program for shoulder pain in this population.

Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted. Sixteen patients who had suffered a stroke and presented with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to receive rehabilitation alone or rehabilitation combined with DN. Both groups received a neurorehabilitation session including modulatory interventions targeting the central nervous system. Patients in the DN group also received a single session of DN over active TrPs in the shoulder musculature. A numerical pain rating scale (NPRS, 0-10) was used to asses post-needling induced pain at 1 min, 24 h, and 72 h after needling. Shoulder pain (NPRS, 0-10) was assessed at baseline, and 3 and 7 days after DN in both groups.

Results: Five (62%) patients receiving TrP-DN reported post-needling induced pain. Post hoc analysis found that post-needling induced pain decreased significantly at 24 and 72 h (both p < 0.001) after DN. Patients receiving TrP-DN plus rehabilitation exhibited greater decreases in shoulder pain intensity at 3 days (Δ = -4.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -5.8 to -2.6) and 7 days (Δ = -4.3, 95% CI = -5.9 to -2.7) after the intervention compared with those receiving rehabilitation alone (all p < 0.001).

Conclusion: This trial found that 50% of stroke patients receiving DN experienced post-needling induced pain, a side effect that almost disappeared 72 h after the intervention without any additional therapeutic action. In addition, the inclusion of TrP-DN into a rehabilitation session was effective at decreasing shoulder pain in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0964528419882941DOI Listing
June 2020

Active Trigger Points Are Associated With Anxiety and Widespread Pressure Pain Sensitivity in Women, but not Men, With Tension Type Headache.

Pain Pract 2019 06 12;19(5):522-529. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Spain.

Background: A better understanding of gender differences can assist clinicians in further developing therapeutic programs in tension type headache (TTH).

Objective: To evaluate gender differences in the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in the head, neck, and shoulder muscles and their relationship with headache features, pressure pain sensitivity, and anxiety in people with TTH.

Methods: Two hundred and ten (59 men, 151 women) patients with TTH participated. TrPs were bilaterally explored in the temporalis, masseter, suboccipital, upper trapezius, splenius capitis, and sternocleidomastoid muscles. Headache features were collected using a 4-week headache diary. Trait and state anxiety levels were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over the temporalis, C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior were assessed.

Results: Women with TTH exhibited a significantly higher number of total (P = 0.027) and active (P = 0.030), but similar number of latent (P = 0.461), TrPs than men with TTH. Active TrPs in the temporalis, suboccipital, and splenius capitis muscles were the most prevalent in both men and women with TTH. The number of active TrPs was associated with anxiety levels (r = 0.217; P = 0.045) in women, but not in men (P = 0.453): the higher the number of active TrPs, the more the trait levels of anxiety. Women exhibited lower PPTs than men (all, P < 0.001). In men, the number of active, but not latent, TrPs was negatively associated with localized PPTs (all, P < 0.05), whereas in women, the number of active and latent TrPs was negatively associated with PPTs in all points (all, P < 0.01): the higher the number of TrPs, the lower the widespread PPTs.

Conclusions: This study described gender differences in the presence of TrPs in TTH. Women with TTH showed lower PPTs than men. The association between TrPs, anxiety levels, and pressure pain hyperalgesia seems to be more pronounced in women than in men with TTH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/papr.12775DOI Listing
June 2019