Publications by authors named "Jorge E Buendia-Buendia"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Opposing immune and genetic mechanisms shape oncogenic programs in synovial sarcoma.

Nat Med 2021 02 25;27(2):289-300. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Synovial sarcoma (SyS) is an aggressive neoplasm driven by the SS18-SSX fusion, and is characterized by low T cell infiltration. Here, we studied the cancer-immune interplay in SyS using an integrative approach that combines single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq), spatial profiling and genetic and pharmacological perturbations. scRNA-seq of 16,872 cells from 12 human SyS tumors uncovered a malignant subpopulation that marks immune-deprived niches in situ and is predictive of poor clinical outcomes in two independent cohorts. Functional analyses revealed that this malignant cell state is controlled by the SS18-SSX fusion, is repressed by cytokines secreted by macrophages and T cells, and can be synergistically targeted with a combination of HDAC and CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors. This drug combination enhanced malignant-cell immunogenicity in SyS models, leading to induced T cell reactivity and T cell-mediated killing. Our study provides a blueprint for investigating heterogeneity in fusion-driven malignancies and demonstrates an interplay between immune evasion and oncogenic processes that can be co-targeted in SyS and potentially in other malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-01212-6DOI Listing
February 2021

Acquired FGFR and FGF Alterations Confer Resistance to Estrogen Receptor (ER) Targeted Therapy in ER Metastatic Breast Cancer.

Clin Cancer Res 2020 Nov 28;26(22):5974-5989. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Center for Cancer Precision Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Purpose: To identify clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance to ER-directed therapies in ER breast cancer.

Experimental Design: We conducted a genome-scale functional screen spanning 10,135 genes to investigate genes whose overexpression confer resistance to selective estrogen receptor degraders. In parallel, we performed whole-exome sequencing in paired pretreatment and postresistance biopsies from 60 patients with ER metastatic breast cancer who had developed resistance to ER-targeted therapy. Furthermore, we performed experiments to validate resistance genes/pathways and to identify drug combinations to overcome resistance.

Results: Pathway analysis of candidate resistance genes demonstrated that the FGFR, ERBB, insulin receptor, and MAPK pathways represented key modalities of resistance. The FGFR pathway was altered via , or amplifications or mutations in 24 (40%) of the postresistance biopsies. In 12 of the 24 postresistance tumors exhibiting FGFR/FGF alterations, these alterations were acquired or enriched under the selective pressure of ER-directed therapy. experiments in ER breast cancer cells confirmed that FGFR/FGF alterations led to fulvestrant resistance as well as cross-resistance to the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. RNA sequencing of resistant cell lines demonstrated that FGFR/FGF induced resistance through ER reprogramming and activation of the MAPK pathway. The resistance phenotypes were reversed by FGFR inhibitors, a MEK inhibitor, and/or a SHP2 inhibitor.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that FGFR pathway is a distinct mechanism of acquired resistance to ER-directed therapy that can be overcome by FGFR and/or MAPK pathway inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-19-3958DOI Listing
November 2020

The Genomic Landscape of Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors in Patients with Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer.

Cancer Discov 2020 Aug 13;10(8):1174-1193. Epub 2020 May 13.

Center for Cancer Precision Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Mechanisms driving resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (CDK4/6i) in hormone receptor-positive (HR) breast cancer have not been clearly defined. Whole-exome sequencing of 59 tumors with CDK4/6i exposure revealed multiple candidate resistance mechanisms including loss, activating alterations in , and , and loss of estrogen receptor expression. experiments confirmed that these alterations conferred CDK4/6i resistance. Cancer cells cultured to resistance with CDK4/6i also acquired , or alterations, which conferred sensitivity to AURKA, ERK, or CHEK1 inhibition. Three of these activating alterations-in , and -have not, to our knowledge, been previously demonstrated as mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6i in breast cancer preclinically or in patient samples. Together, these eight mechanisms were present in 66% of resistant tumors profiled and may define therapeutic opportunities in patients. SIGNIFICANCE: We identified eight distinct mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6i present in 66% of resistant tumors profiled. Most of these have a therapeutic strategy to overcome or prevent resistance in these tumors. Taken together, these findings have critical implications related to the potential utility of precision-based approaches to overcome resistance in many patients with HR metastatic breast cancer..
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/2159-8290.CD-19-1390DOI Listing
August 2020

High levels of RNA-editing site conservation amongst 15 laboratory mouse strains.

Genome Biol 2012 Apr 23;13(4):26. Epub 2012 Apr 23.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1HH, UK.

Background: Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is a site-selective post-transcriptional alteration of double-stranded RNA by ADAR deaminases that is crucial for homeostasis and development. Recently the Mouse Genomes Project generated genome sequences for 17 laboratory mouse strains and rich catalogues of variants. We also generated RNA-seq data from whole brain RNA from 15 of the sequenced strains.

Results: Here we present a computational approach that takes an initial set of transcriptome/genome mismatch sites and filters these calls taking into account systematic biases in alignment, single nucleotide variant calling, and sequencing depth to identify RNA editing sites with high accuracy. We applied this approach to our panel of mouse strain transcriptomes identifying 7,389 editing sites with an estimated false-discovery rate of between 2.9 and 10.5%. The overwhelming majority of these edits were of the A-to-I type, with less than 2.4% not of this class, and only three of these edits could not be explained as alignment artifacts. We validated 24 novel RNA editing sites in coding sequence, including two non-synonymous edits in the Cacna1d gene that fell into the IQ domain portion of the Cav1.2 voltage-gated calcium channel, indicating a potential role for editing in the generation of transcript diversity.

Conclusions: We show that despite over two million years of evolutionary divergence, the sites edited and the level of editing at each site is remarkably consistent across the 15 strains. In the Cds2 gene we find evidence for RNA editing acting to preserve the ancestral transcript sequence despite genomic sequence divergence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/gb-2012-13-4-r26DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3446300PMC
April 2012