Publications by authors named "Jordana Muñoz-Basagoiti"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Autochthonous and imported tegumentary leishmaniasis in Catalonia (Spain): Aetiological evolution in the last four decades and usefulness of different typing approaches based on biochemical, molecular and proteomic markers.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2021 Apr 17. Epub 2021 Apr 17.

Secció de Parasitologia, Departament de Biologia, Sanitat i Medi Ambient, Facultat de Farmàcia i Ciències de l'Alimentació, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Leishmaniasis is a transmissible disease caused by Leishmania protozoa. Spain is endemic for both visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, the autochthonous aetiological agent being Leishmania infantum. Around the world, the L. donovani complex is associated with visceral symptoms, while any species of the Leishmania or Viannia subgenera affecting human can produce tegumentary forms. In a context of growing numbers of imported cases, associated with globalisation, the aim of this study was to analyse the aetiological evolution of human tegumentary leishmaniasis in a region of Spain (Catalonia). Fifty-six Leishmania strains, isolated from 1981 to 2018, were analysed using MLEE, gene sequencing (hsp70, rpoIILS, fh and ITS2) and MALDI-TOF. The utility of these different analytical methods was compared. The results showed an increase in leishmaniasis over the two last decades, particularly imported cases, which represented 39% of all cases studied. Leishmania infantum, L. major, L. tropica, L. braziliensis, L. guyanensis and L. panamensis were identified. The combination of molecular and enzymatic methods allowed the identification of 29 different strain types (A to AC). Strain diversity was higher in L. (Viannia), whilst the different L. major types were relatable with geo-temporal data. Among the autochthonous cases, type C prevailed throughout the studied period (39%). Minor types generally appeared within a short time interval. While all the techniques provided identical identification at the species complex level, MALDI-TOF and rpoIILS or fh sequencing would be the most suitable identification tools for clinical practice, and the tandem hsp70-ITS2 could substitute MLEE in the epidemiological field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.14107DOI Listing
April 2021

Identification of Plitidepsin as Potent Inhibitor of SARS-CoV-2-Induced Cytopathic Effect After a Drug Repurposing Screen.

Front Pharmacol 2021 25;12:646676. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

IrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute, Badalona, Spain.

There is an urgent need to identify therapeutics for the treatment of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although different antivirals are given for the clinical management of SARS-CoV-2 infection, their efficacy is still under evaluation. Here, we have screened existing drugs approved for human use in a variety of diseases, to compare how they counteract SARS-CoV-2-induced cytopathic effect and viral replication Among the potential 72 antivirals tested herein that were previously proposed to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection, only 18 % had an IC below 25 µM or 10 IU/ml. These included plitidepsin, novel cathepsin inhibitors, nelfinavir mesylate hydrate, interferon 2-alpha, interferon-gamma, fenofibrate, camostat along the well-known remdesivir and chloroquine derivatives. Plitidepsin was the only clinically approved drug displaying nanomolar efficacy. Four of these families, including novel cathepsin inhibitors, blocked viral entry in a cell-type specific manner. Since the most effective antivirals usually combine therapies that tackle the virus at different steps of infection, we also assessed several drug combinations. Although no particular synergy was found, inhibitory combinations did not reduce their antiviral activity. Thus, these combinations could decrease the potential emergence of resistant viruses. Antivirals prioritized herein identify novel compounds and their mode of action, while independently replicating the activity of a reduced proportion of drugs which are mostly approved for clinical use. Combinations of these drugs should be tested in animal models to inform the design of fast track clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2021.646676DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8033486PMC
March 2021

SARS-CoV-2 Cellular Infection and Therapeutic Opportunities: Lessons Learned from Ebola Virus.

Membranes (Basel) 2021 Jan 18;11(1). Epub 2021 Jan 18.

IrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute, Germans Trias I Pujol Research Institute (IGTP), Can Ruti Campus, 08916 Badalona, Spain.

Viruses rely on the cellular machinery to replicate and propagate within newly infected individuals. Thus, viral entry into the host cell sets up the stage for productive infection and disease progression. Different viruses exploit distinct cellular receptors for viral entry; however, numerous viral internalization mechanisms are shared by very diverse viral families. Such is the case of Ebola virus (EBOV), which belongs to the filoviridae family, and the recently emerged coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. These two highly pathogenic viruses can exploit very similar endocytic routes to productively infect target cells. This convergence has sped up the experimental assessment of clinical therapies against SARS-CoV-2 previously found to be effective for EBOV, and facilitated their expedited clinical testing. Here we review how the viral entry processes and subsequent replication and egress strategies of EBOV and SARS-CoV-2 can overlap, and how our previous knowledge on antivirals, antibodies, and vaccines against EBOV has boosted the search for effective countermeasures against the new coronavirus. As preparedness is key to contain forthcoming pandemics, lessons learned over the years by combating life-threatening viruses should help us to quickly deploy effective tools against novel emerging viruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/membranes11010064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7830673PMC
January 2021

Variation around the dominant viral genome sequence contributes to viral load and outcome in patients with Ebola virus disease.

Genome Biol 2020 09 7;21(1):238. Epub 2020 Sep 7.

Institute for Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.

Background: Viral load is a major contributor to outcome in patients with Ebola virus disease (EVD), with high values leading to a fatal outcome. Evidence from the 2013-2016 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak indicated that different genotypes of the virus can have different phenotypes in patients. Additionally, due to the error-prone nature of viral RNA synthesis in an individual patient, the EBOV genome exists around a dominant viral genome sequence. The minor variants within a patient may contribute to the overall phenotype in terms of viral protein function. To investigate the effects of these minor variants, blood samples from patients with acute EVD were deeply sequenced.

Results: We examine the minor variant frequency between patients with acute EVD who survived infection with those who died. Non-synonymous differences in viral proteins were identified that have implications for viral protein function. The greatest frequency of substitution was identified at three codon sites in the L gene-which encodes the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Recapitulating this in an assay for virus replication, these substitutions result in aberrant viral RNA synthesis and correlate with patient outcome.

Conclusions: Together, these findings support the notion that in patients who survived EVD, in some cases, the genetic variability of the virus resulted in deleterious mutations that affected viral protein function, leading to reduced viral load. Such mutations may also lead to persistent strains of the virus and be associated with recrudescent infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-020-02148-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7475720PMC
September 2020