Publications by authors named "Joo Sung Lee"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Enhanced Antioxidant Capacity of Puffed Turmeric ( L.) by High Hydrostatic Pressure Extraction (HHPE) of Bioactive Compounds.

Foods 2020 Nov 18;9(11). Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Biotechnology, Institute of Life Science and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104, Korea.

Turmeric ( L.) is known for its health benefits. Several previous studies revealed that curcumin, the main active compound in turmeric, has antioxidant capacity. It has been previously demonstrated that puffing, the physical processing using high heat and pressure, of turmeric increases the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities by increasing phenolic compounds in the extract. The current study sought to determine if high hydrostatic pressure extraction (HHPE), a non-thermal extraction at over 100 MPa, aids in the chemical changes and antioxidant functioning of turmeric. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) analyses were conducted and assessed the content of total phenol compounds in the extract. The chemical changes of curcuminoids were also determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Among the three variables of ethanol concentration, pressure level, and treatment time, ethanol concentration was the most influential factor for the HHPE of turmeric. HHPE at 400 MPa for 20 min with 70% EtOH was the optimal extraction condition for the highest antioxidant activity. Compositional analysis revealed that 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol was produced by puffing. Vanillic acid and ferulic acid content increased with increasing HHPE time. Synergistic effect was not observed on antioxidant activity when the turmeric was sequentially processed using puffing and HHPE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods9111690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7699201PMC
November 2020

A huge benign cystic phyllodes tumor presenting as a complex cystic mass on ultrasound examination.

Breast J 2018 11 22;24(6):1062-1063. Epub 2018 Jul 22.

Department of Pathology, Inha University Hospital, Incheon, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13091DOI Listing
November 2018

Selective removal of heavy metal ions by disulfide linked polymer networks.

J Hazard Mater 2017 Jun 6;332:140-148. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej 113, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. Electronic address:

Heavy metal contaminated surface water is one of the oldest pollution problems, which is critical to ecosystems and human health. We devised disulfide linked polymer networks and employed as a sorbent for removing heavy metal ions from contaminated water. Although the polymer network material has a moderate surface area, it demonstrated cadmium removal efficiency equivalent to highly porous activated carbon while it showed 16 times faster sorption kinetics compared to activated carbon, owing to the high affinity of cadmium towards disulfide and thiol functionality in the polymer network. The metal sorption mechanism on polymer network was studied by sorption kinetics, effect of pH, and metal complexation. We observed that the metal ions-copper, cadmium, and zinc showed high binding affinity in polymer network, even in the presence of competing cations like calcium in water.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2017.03.007DOI Listing
June 2017

Correction: Highly lithium-ion conductive battery separators from thermally rearranged polybenzoxazole.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2015 Feb;51(16):3474

School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.

Correction for 'Highly lithium-ion conductive battery separators from thermally rearranged polybenzoxazole' by Moon Joo Lee et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 2068-2071.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c5cc90064fDOI Listing
February 2015

Highly lithium-ion conductive battery separators from thermally rearranged polybenzoxazole.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2015 Feb;51(11):2068-71

School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.

High power density lithium ion battery (HLIB) separators were fabricated for the first time from thermally rearranged poly(benzoxazole-co-imide) (TR-PBOI) nanofibrous membranes coated with TR-PBOI nanoparticles, which show distinct thermal and dimensional stabilities as well as excellent cycle retention and rate capability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4cc09411eDOI Listing
February 2015

Inverse opal-inspired, nanoscaffold battery separators: a new membrane opportunity for high-performance energy storage systems.

Nano Lett 2014 Aug 3;14(8):4438-48. Epub 2014 Jul 3.

School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) , Ulsan, 689-798, Korea.

The facilitation of ion/electron transport, along with ever-increasing demand for high-energy density, is a key to boosting the development of energy storage systems such as lithium-ion batteries. Among major battery components, separator membranes have not been the center of attention compared to other electrochemically active materials, despite their important roles in allowing ionic flow and preventing electrical contact between electrodes. Here, we present a new class of battery separator based on inverse opal-inspired, seamless nanoscaffold structure ("IO separator"), as an unprecedented membrane opportunity to enable remarkable advances in cell performance far beyond those accessible with conventional battery separators. The IO separator is easily fabricated through one-pot, evaporation-induced self-assembly of colloidal silica nanoparticles in the presence of ultraviolet (UV)-curable triacrylate monomer inside a nonwoven substrate, followed by UV-cross-linking and selective removal of the silica nanoparticle superlattices. The precisely ordered/well-reticulated nanoporous structure of IO separator allows significant improvement in ion transfer toward electrodes. The IO separator-driven facilitation of the ion transport phenomena is expected to play a critical role in the realization of high-performance batteries (in particular, under harsh conditions such as high-mass-loading electrodes, fast charging/discharging, and highly polar liquid electrolyte). Moreover, the IO separator enables the movement of the Ragone plot curves to a more desirable position representing high-energy/high-power density, without tailoring other battery materials and configurations. This study provides a new perspective on battery separators: a paradigm shift from plain porous films to pseudoelectrochemically active nanomembranes that can influence the charge/discharge reaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl5014037DOI Listing
August 2014

Dynamics of DNA tumbling in shear to rotational mixed flows: pathways and periods.

Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 2007 Apr 27;75(4 Pt 1):040802. Epub 2007 Apr 27.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

The tumbling dynamics of DNA have been examined via experiments and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in mixed flows that vary from pure shear to pure rotation. In shear, tumbling pathways and periods agree well with earlier studies; in rotation-dominated flows, a new tumbling pathway is identified and experimentally observed. Based on these results, we have developed robust scaling laws for DNA tumbling in both shear and rotational flows and have found a critical flow-type parameter for transition from the shearlike flow regime to the rotation-dominated one.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.75.040802DOI Listing
April 2007