Publications by authors named "Joni Augusto Cirelli"

63 Publications

A Prosthetic and Surgical Approach for Full-Arch Rehabilitation in Atrophic Maxilla Previously Affected by Peri-Implantitis.

Case Rep Dent 2021 31;2021:6637500. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, São Paulo State University (UNESP), School of Dentistry, Araraquara Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Rehabilitation of atrophic maxilla with dental implants is still a challenge in clinical practice especially in cases of alveolar bone resorption due to peri-implantitis and pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses. Several surgical approaches have been employed to reconstruct the lost tissues allowing the proper tridimensional position of the implants. In this context, the aim of this case report is to describe a surgical and prosthetic approach to fully rehabilitate the atrophic maxilla with dental implants. The patient presented with unsatisfactory functional and esthetical implant-supported prosthesis with some of the implants already lost by peri-implantitis. The remaining three implants were also affected by peri-implantitis. Reversal prosthetic planning was performed, and a provisional prosthesis was fabricated and anchored in two short implants. Sinus floor augmentation procedure and onlay bone graft were then accomplished. After a healing period of 8 months, digital-guided surgery approach was performed to place the implants. Finally, a definitive prosthesis was installed. One-year follow-up has revealed stabilization of the bone tissue level, successful osseointegration, and a pleasant esthetic and functional result. A proper diagnosis and careful planning play an important role to enhance precision and to achieve patient esthetic and functional outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6637500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8026321PMC
March 2021

Cystatin-like protein of sweet orange (CsinCPI-2) modulates pre-osteoblast differentiation via β-Catenin involvement.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2021 Mar 22;32(4):33. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

Phytocystatins are endogenous cysteine-protease inhibitors present in plants. They are involved in initial germination rates and in plant defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Recently, a new phytocystatin derived from sweet orange, CsinCPI-2, has been shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of human cathepsins, presenting anti-inflammatory potential and pro-osteogenic effect in human dental pulp cells. The osteogenic potential of the CsinCPI-2 protein represents a new insight into plants cysteine proteases inhibitors and this effect needs to be better addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of pre-osteoblasts in response to CsinCPI-2, mainly focusing on cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation mechanisms. Together our data show that in the first hours of treatment, protein in CsinCPI-2 promotes an increase in the expression of adhesion markers, which decrease after 24 h, leading to the activation of Kinase-dependent cyclines (CDKs) modulating the transition from G1 to S phases cell cycle. In addition, we saw that the increase in ERK may be associated with activation of the differentiation profile, also observed with an increase in the B-Catenin pathway and an increase in the expression of Runx2 in the group that received the treatment with CsinCPI-2.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-021-06504-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7985097PMC
March 2021

Effects of obesity on periodontal tissue remodeling during orthodontic movement.

Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2021 Apr 6;159(4):480-490. Epub 2021 Feb 6.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, São Paulo State University, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Introduction: Orthodontic movement triggers a sequence of cellular and molecular events that may be affected by different systemic conditions. This study evaluated the effect of obesity on rat periodontal tissue remodeling induced by mechanical orthodontic force.

Methods: Thirty-two Holtzman rats were distributed into 4 groups: control, obesity induction (O), orthodontic movement (M), and obesity induction and orthodontic movement (OM). Obesity was induced by a high-fat diet for 90 days. After 15 days of orthodontic movement, the animals were killed. Obesity induction was confirmed by animal body weight, adipose tissue weight, and serologic analysis. Periodontal tissue remodeling was evaluated using microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis. The gene expression of adipokines and cytokines in gingival tissues was evaluated.

Results: An increase in body and adipose tissue weight was observed in the obesity induction groups. The O group presented an increase in lipids and blood glucose. The OM group showed a decrease in bone volume fraction and bone mineral density compared with all other groups and a tendency for more rapid tooth movement than the M group. The OM group showed a higher quantity of inflammatory cells and higher Mmp1 expression than the O group. The O and OM groups showed higher Nampt expression than the control group and lower Nampt expression than the M group.

Conclusions: Obesity modulates periodontal tissue remodeling during orthodontic movement and results in more inflammation and bone loss than in nonobese animals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2019.12.025DOI Listing
April 2021

Regulation of Anti-Apoptotic SOD2 and BIRC3 in Periodontal Cells and Tissues.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Jan 8;22(2). Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Department of Periodontology and Operative Dentistry, University Medical Center, University of Mainz, 55131 Mainz, Germany.

The aim of the study was to clarify whether orthodontic forces and periodontitis interact with respect to the anti-apoptotic molecules superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 3 (BIRC3). SOD2, BIRC3, and the apoptotic markers caspases 3 (CASP3) and 9 (CASP9) were analyzed in gingiva from periodontally healthy and periodontitis subjects by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. SOD2 and BIRC3 were also studied in gingiva from rats with experimental periodontitis and/or orthodontic tooth movement. Additionally, SOD2 and BIRC3 levels were examined in human periodontal fibroblasts incubated with and/or subjected to mechanical forces. Gingiva from periodontitis patients showed significantly higher SOD2, BIRC3, CASP3, and CASP9 levels than periodontally healthy gingiva. SOD2 and BIRC3 expressions were also significantly increased in the gingiva from rats with experimental periodontitis, but the upregulation of both molecules was significantly diminished in the concomitant presence of orthodontic tooth movement. In vitro, SOD2 and BIRC3 levels were significantly increased by , but this stimulatory effect was also significantly inhibited by mechanical forces. Our study suggests that SOD2 and BIRC3 are produced in periodontal infection as a protective mechanism against exaggerated apoptosis. In the concomitant presence of orthodontic forces, this protective anti-apoptotic mechanism may get lost.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020591DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7827060PMC
January 2021

Filling Ability and Flow of Root Canal Sealers: A Micro-Computed Tomographic Study.

Braz Dent J 2020 Sep-Oct;31(5):499-504

Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

This study evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT) the filling ability in curved root canals, besides the flow of AH Plus (AHP) and Neo MTA Plus (NMTAP) sealers using different methodologies. Mandibular molars mesial roots with two root canals and degree of curvature between 20° and 40° were selected. The specimens were prepared with the ProDesign R system up to size 35.05 and were filled with the sealers by a continuous wave of condensation technique, Thermo Pack II (n=12). The teeth were scanned using μCT after root canal preparation and obturation. The volumetric percentage of filling material and voids were calculated. Flow was evaluated based on ISO 6876/2012 (n=10). Flow and filling were also evaluated in μCT using a glass plate with a central cavity and four grooves from the central cavity (n=6). Flow was linearly calculated into the grooves. The central cavity filling (CCF) and lateral cavity filling (LCF) were calculated in mm³. Data were submitted to non-paired t test with a significance threshold at 5%. The percentage of filling and voids between the root canals filled with AHP or NMTAP was similar (p>0.05). NMTAP presented the lowest flow in conventional test (p<0.05). Using μCT, sealers had similar CCF, LCF and linear flow (p>0.05). In conclusion, NMTAP and AHP had similar filling ability in curved mesial root canals of mandibular molars without presence of isthmus. Although AHP presented better flow than NMTAP using ISO methodology, there was no difference between these materials regarding volumetric filling when evaluated by μCT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0103-6440202003328DOI Listing
November 2020

Effect of two corticotomy protocols on periodontal tissue and orthodontic movement.

J Appl Oral Sci 2020 3;28:e20190766. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Universidade Estadual Paulista, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brasil.

Objective To compare two corticotomy surgical protocols in rats to verify whether they alter conventional orthodontic movement. Methodology Sixty Wistar rats were divided into three groups - orthodontic movement (CG), orthodontic movement and corticotomy (G1) and orthodontic movement with corticotomy and decortication (G2) - and euthanized after 7 and 14 days. Tooth movement (mm), bone volume fraction and bone volume ratio to total volume (BV/TV), and bone mineral density (BMD) were evaluated by micro-CT. The total amount of bone was measured in square millimeters and expressed as the percentage of bone area in the histomorphometry. The number of positive TRAP cells and RANK/RANKL/OPG interaction were also investigated. Results Day 14 showed a statistically significant difference in orthodontic tooth movement in CG compared with G1 (7.52 mm; p=0.009) and G2 (7.36 mm; p=0.016). A micro-CT analysis revealed a difference between CG, G1 and G2 regarding BV/TV, with G1 and G2 presenting a lower BV/TV ratio at 14 days (0.77 and 0.73 respectively); we found no statistically significant differences regarding BMD. There was a difference in the total amount of bone in the CG group between 7 and 14 days. At 14 days, CG presented a significantly higher bone percentage than G1 and G2. Regarding TRAP, G2 had more positive cells at 7 and 14 days compared with CG and G1. Conclusion Corticotomy accelerates orthodontic movement. Decortication does not improve corticotomy efficiency.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1678-7757-2019-0766DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7340209PMC
October 2020

Effects of orthodontic tooth extrusion produced by different techniques, on the periodontal tissues: a histological study in dogs.

Arch Oral Biol 2020 Aug 20;116:104768. Epub 2020 May 20.

Department of Diagnostic and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal tissue changes resulting from different methods of orthodontic tooth extrusion in dogs.

Materials And Methods: Notches were surgically prepared in the root surface at the bone crest level of the first premolars of mongrel dogs. After 37 days, extrusion of the first lower and upper premolars was randomly performed by 3 different methods: conventional orthodontic extrusion (OE); open flap debridement performed immediately before orthodontic extrusion (OF); and orthodontic extrusion associated with weekly fiberotomy and scaling (FS). For all groups, extrusion was performed for 21 days followed by one-month retention and sacrifice. Periodontal parameters, descriptive histology, and histomorphometric analyses were performed at the end of the experimental period.

Results: The median extrusion was 2.25 in the fiberotomy group, 2.0 mm in the open flap group and 1.0 mm in the orthodontic extrusion group with no significant differences between groups. The highest distance between reference notch and bone crest was observed in the fiberotomy group (p < 0.05). Histologically, radicular resorption repaired with cellular cementum was detected in all groups.

Conclusions: Tooth extrusion was successfully achieved with all of the different methods of orthodontic tooth extrusion with no statistical significance between techniques. The fiberotomy approach was effective in avoiding coronal displacement of periodontal tissues. Fiberotomy associated with scaling should be indicated if the objective of the treatment is extrusion without periodontal tissue displacement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2020.104768DOI Listing
August 2020

Topical application of lectin Artin M improves wound healing in defects created in the palatal mucosa: an in vivo study in dogs.

Odontology 2020 Oct 19;108(4):560-568. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Division of PeriodontologyDepartment of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, R Humaita, 1680, Araraquara, São Paulo, 14801-903, Brazil.

Previous studies have shown that topical application of lectin Artin-M accelerates wound healing in the rat oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of histology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) the effects of Artin-M on wound healing in the palatal mucosa in dogs. Three full thickness wounds of 6 mm diameter were surgically created in the palatal mucosa of twenty dogs and randomly divided into three groups according to one of the treatment assigned: Group C-Control (coagulum); Group A-Artin-M gel; Group V-Vehicle (carboxymethylcellulose 3%). Each animal received all the three experimental treatments. Afterwards, four animals were killed at 2, 4, 7, 14 and 21 days post-surgery. Wounded areas were photographed and scored for macroscopic evaluation. Biopsies were harvested and used for descriptive histological analysis, proliferating cell nuclear antigen IHC and measurement of myeloperoxidase activity. The results demonstrated faster wound closure in group A in comparison to the other groups in all the periods evaluated. Histological analyses exhibited improved re-epithelialization and collagen fiber formation resulting in faster maturation of granulation tissue in group A compared to the other groups by day 14. Treatment with Artin-M gel significantly induced cell proliferation and increased volumetric density of fibroblasts at day 2 and 4 (p < 0.05). Neutrophil infiltration in group A was significantly higher than the other groups (p < 0.05) at the same time points. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that Artin-M may potentially favor wound healing on palatal mucosa lesions via recruitment of neutrophils and promotion of cell proliferation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10266-020-00495-yDOI Listing
October 2020

Systemic Resolvin E1 (RvE1) Treatment Does Not Ameliorate the Severity of Collagen-Induced Arthritis (CIA) in Mice: A Randomized, Prospective, and Controlled Proof of Concept Study.

Mediators Inflamm 2019 31;2019:5689465. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Department of Rheumatology, Radboud University Medical Center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Specialized proresolving mediators (SPRM), which arise from n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3FA), promote resolution of inflammation and may help to prevent progression of an acute inflammatory response into chronic inflammation in patients with arthritis. Thus, this study is aimed at determining whether systemic RvE1 treatment reduces arthritis onset and severity in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and spontaneous cytokine production by human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial explants. 10-week-old DBA1/J male mice were subjected to CIA and treated systemically with 0.1 g RvE1, 1 g RvE1, 5 mg/kg anti-TNF (positive control group), PBS (negative control group), or with a combination of 1 g of RvE1 plus 5 mg/kg anti-TNF using prophylactic or therapeutic strategies. After CIA immunization, mice were treated twice a week by RvE1 or anti-TNF for 10 days. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling and histology of ankle joints. Moreover, human RA synovial explants were incubated with 1 nM, 10 nM, or 100 nM of RvE1, and cytokine levels (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, INF-, and TNF-) were measured using Luminex bead array. CIA triggered significant inflammation in the synovial cavity, proteoglycan loss, and cartilage and bone destruction in the ankle joints of mice. Prophylactic and therapeutic RvE1 regimens did not ameliorate CIA incidence and severity. Anti-TNF treatment significantly abrogated signs of joint inflammation, bone erosion, and proteoglycan depletion, but additional RvE1 treatment did not further reduce the anti-TNF-mediated suppression of the disease. Treatment with different concentrations of RvE1 did not decrease the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human RA synovial explants in the studied conditions. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that RvE1 treatment was not an effective approach to treat CIA in DBA1/J mice in both prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, no effects were noticed when human synovial explants were incubated with different concentrations of RvE1.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/5689465DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6875002PMC
May 2020

Linkage of Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Current Evidence and Potential Biological Interactions.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Sep 13;20(18). Epub 2019 Sep 13.

Department of Rheumatology, Radboud University Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD) has been the focus of numerous investigations driven by their common pathological features. RA is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation, the production of anti-citrullinated proteins antibodies (ACPA) leading to synovial joint inflammation and destruction. PD is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with a dysbiotic microbial biofilm affecting the supporting tissues around the teeth leading to the destruction of mineralized and non-mineralized connective tissues. Chronic inflammation associated with both RA and PD is similar in the predominant adaptive immune phenotype, in the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and in the role of smoking and genetic background as risk factors. Structural damage that occurs in consequence of chronic inflammation is the ultimate cause of loss of function and disability observed with the progression of RA and PD. Interestingly, the periodontal pathogen has been implicated in the generation of ACPA in RA patients, suggesting a direct biological intersection between PD and RA. However, more studies are warranted to confirm this link, elucidate potential mechanisms involved, and ascertain temporal associations between RA and PD. This review is mainly focused on recent clinical and translational research intends to discuss and provide an overview of the relationship between RA and PD, exploring the similarities in the immune-pathological aspects and the possible mechanisms linking the development and progression of both diseases. In addition, the current available treatments targeting both RA and PD were revised.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20184541DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6769683PMC
September 2019

In vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory and pro-osteogenic effects of citrus cystatin CsinCPI-2.

Cytokine 2019 11 18;123:154760. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Cystatins are natural inhibitors of cysteine peptidases. Recently, cystatins derived from plants, named phytocystatins, have been extensively studied. Among them, CsinCPI-2 proteins from Citrus sinensis were identified and recombinantly produced by our group. Thus, this study described the recombinant expression, purification, and inhibitory activity of this new phytocystatin against human cathepsins K and B and assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of CsinCPI-2 in vitro in mouse and in vivo in rats. In addition, the pro-osteogenic effect of CsinCPI-2 was investigated in vitro. The inflammatory response of mouse macrophage cells stimulated with P. gingivalis was modulated by CsinCPI-2. The in vitro results showed an inhibitory effect (p < 0.05) on cathepsin K, cathepsin B, IL-1β, and TNF-α gene expression. In addition, CsinCPI-2 significantly inhibited in vivo the activity of TNF-α (p < 0.05) in the blood of rats, previously stimulated by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). CsinCPI-2 had a pro-osteogenic effect in human dental pulp cells, demonstrated by the increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, deposition of mineralized nodules, and the gene expression of the osteogenic markers as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx-2), ALP, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein (BSP). These preliminary studies suggested that CsinCPI-2 has a potential anti-inflammatory, and at the same time, a pro-osteogenic effect. This may lead to new therapies for the control of diseases where inflammation plays a key role, such as periodontal disease and apical periodontitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2019.154760DOI Listing
November 2019

Regulation of ghrelin receptor by microbial and inflammatory signals in human osteoblasts.

Braz Oral Res 2019 Apr 25;33:e025. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg University, Department of Periodontology and Operative Dentistry, Mainz, Germany.

Recently, it has been suggested that the anti-inflammatory hormone ghrelin (GHRL) and its receptor GHS-R may play a pivotal role in periodontal health and diseases. However, their exact regulation and effects in periodontitis are not known. The aim of this in-vitro study was to investigate the effect of microbial and inflammatory insults on the GHS-R1a expression in human osteoblast-like cells. MG-63 cells were exposed to interleukin (IL)-1β and Fusobacterium nucleatum in the presence and absence of GHRL for up to 2 d. Subsequently, gene expressions of GHS-R1a, inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinase were analyzed by real-time PCR. GHS-R protein synthesis and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation were assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. IL-1β and F. nucleatum caused a significant upregulation of GHS-R1a expression and an increase in GHS-R1a protein. Pre-incubation with a MEK1/2 inhibitor diminished the IL-1β-induced GHS-R1a upregulation. IL-1β and F. nucleatum also enhanced the expressions of cyclooxygenase 2, CC-chemokine ligand 2, IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinase 1, but these stimulatory effects were counteracted by GHRL. By contrast, the stimulatory actions of IL-1β and F. nucleatum on the GHS-R1a expression were further enhanced by GHRL. Our study provides original evidence that IL-1β and F. nucleatum regulate the GHS-R/GHRL system in osteoblast-like cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that the proinflammatory and proteolytic actions of IL-1β and F. nucleatum on osteoblast-like cells are inhibited by GHRL. Our study suggests that microbial and inflammatory insults upregulate GHS-R1a, which may represent a protective negative feedback mechanism in human bone.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1807-3107bor-2019.vol33.0025DOI Listing
April 2019

Characterization of ligature-induced experimental periodontitis.

Microsc Res Tech 2018 Dec 23;81(12):1412-1421. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Araraquara, Brazil.

We sought to better characterize the progression of periodontal tissue breakdown in rats induced by a ligature model of experimental periodontal disease (PD). A total of 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats were evenly divided into an untreated control group and a PD group induced by ligature bilaterally around first and second maxillary molars. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days after the induction of PD. Alveolar bone loss was evaluated by histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography (μCT). The immune-inflammatory process in the periodontal tissue was assessed using descriptive histologic analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This ligature model resulted in significant alveolar bone loss and increased inflammatory process of the periodontal tissues during the initial periods of evaluation (0-14 days). A significant increase in the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and proteins involved in osteoclastogenesis, receptor activator of nuclear factor-k B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) was observed in the first week of analysis. In the later periods of evaluation (14-21 days), no significant alterations were noted with regard to inflammatory processes, bone resorption, and expression of cytokine genes. The ligature-induced PD model resulted in progressive alveolar bone resorption with two different phases: Acute (0-14 days), characterized by inflammation and rapid bone resorption, and chronic (14-21 days) with no significant progression of bone loss. Furthermore, the gene expressions of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, RANKL, and OPG were highly increased during the progress of PD in the early periods. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: Ligature-induced bone resorption in rats occurred in the initial periods after disease induction The bone resorption was characterized by two distinct phases: Acute (0-14 days), with pronounced inflammation and alveolar bone loss Chronic phase (14-21 days): No further disease progression Several pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased during the progress of periodontitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.23101DOI Listing
December 2018

Evaluation of bone turnover after bisphosphonate withdrawal and its influence on implant osseointegration: an in vivo study in rats.

Clin Oral Investig 2019 Apr 30;23(4):1733-1744. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Humaita Street, 1680, Araraquara, SP, 14801-903, Brazil.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate bone turnover alterations after alendronate (ALD) withdrawal and its influence on dental implants osseointegration.

Materials And Methods: Seventy female Wistar rats were randomly divided in 2 groups that received on day 0 either placebo (control group-CTL; n = 10) or 1 mg/kg sodium alendronate (ALD; n = 60) once a week for 4 months. At day 120, ALD treatment was suspended for 50 animals. Then, a titanium implant was placed in the left tibia of each rat that were randomly allocated in five subgroups of ten animals each, according to the period of evaluation: day 0 (INT-0), day 7 (INT-7), day 14 (INT-14), day 28 (INT-28), and day 45 (INT-45) after ALD withdrawal. CTL group and a group that received ALD until the end of the experimental period (non-interrupted group-non-INT; n = 10) underwent implant placement on day 120. Animals were euthanized 28 days after implant surgery. Bone mineral density (BMD) of femur and lumbar vertebrae were evaluated by DXA, biochemical markers of bone turnover were analyzed by ELISA, and bone histomorphometry was performed to measure bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO).

Results: All groups receiving ALD showed higher BMD values when compared to CTL group, which were maintained after its withdrawal. Decreased concentrations in all bone turnover markers were observed in the non-INT group, and in the groups in which ALD was discontinued compared to the CTL group. The non-INT group showed lower %BIC and notably changes in bone quality, which was persistent after drug withdrawal.

Conclusion: Collectively, the findings of this study demonstrated that ALD therapy decreased bone turnover and impaired bone quality and quantity around dental implants, and that its discontinuation did not reverse these findings.

Clinical Relevance: The severe suppression of bone turnover caused by the prolonged use of ALD may alter the capacity of bone tissue to integrate with the implant threads impairing the osseointegration process.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-018-2612-xDOI Listing
April 2019

Three-dimensional printing and in vitro evaluation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) scaffolds functionalized with osteogenic growth peptide for tissue engineering.

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl 2018 Aug 12;89:265-273. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

São Paulo State University - UNESP, School of Dentistry, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a biodegradable and thermoprocessable biopolymer, making it a promising candidate for applications in tissue engineering. In the present study a structural characterization and in vitro evaluation were performed on PHB scaffolds produced by additive manufacturing via selective laser sintering (SLS), followed by post-printing functionalization with osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) and its C-terminal sequence OGP(10-14). The PHB scaffolds were characterized, including their morphology, porosity, thermal and mechanical properties, moreover OGP release. The results showed that SLS technology allowed the sintering of the PHB scaffolds with a hierarchical structure with interconnected pores and intrinsic porosity (porosity of 55.8 ± 0.7% and pore size in the 500-700 μm range), and good mechanical properties. Furthermore, the SLS technology did not change thermal properties of PHB polymer. The OGP release profile showed that PHB scaffold promoted a controlled release above 72 h. In vitro assays using rat bone marrow stem cells showed good cell viability/proliferation in all the PHB scaffolds. Additionally, SEM images suggested advanced morphological differentiation in the groups containing osteogenic growth peptide. The overall results demonstrated that PHB biopolymer is potential candidate for 3D printing via SLS technology, moreover the OGP-containing PHB scaffolds showed ability to sustain cell growth to support tissue formation thereby might be considered for tissue-engineering applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2018.04.016DOI Listing
August 2018

Modified approach for keratinized tissue augmentation in multiple teeth.

J Indian Soc Periodontol 2017 Nov-Dec;21(6):512-516

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, University Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

This case report demonstrated a modified technique of free gingival graft (FGG) aiming to increase keratinized attached tissue in large recipient areas. A FGG to increase the amount of attached gingival tissue, facilitate oral hygiene, and prevent further clinical attachment loss was realized in two patients. Because the extensive recipient area, a modified technique was performed to obtain a smaller graft of the donor area. A template of the graft was made about 25%-30% smaller than the total recipient area. After graft removal, interspersed incisions were made in the upper and lower edges of it. After 9-24 months of follow-up, the final width of the keratinized tissue was 4.0-4.4 times larger in comparison to initial clinical condition. In conclusion, this FGG technique can be considered an alternative to gain sufficient amount of keratinized gingival tissue using a smaller graft.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jisp.jisp_332_16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5846252PMC
March 2018

Vertical Bone Augmentation Using Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral, Absorbable Collagen Sponge, and Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2: An In Vivo Study in Rabbits.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2018 May/June;33(3):512–522. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to assess vertical bone augmentation using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) infused or not with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) in rabbit tibiae.

Materials And Methods: A total of 18 female rabbits (New Zealand) received two blocks of DBBM in each tibia. The DBBM blocks were randomly assigned into four experimental groups: DBBM (only the bone graft); DBBM associated with absorbable collagen sponge (ACS); DBBM plus rhBMP-2 (1.5 mg/mL); and DBBM infused with rhBMP-2 (1.5 mg/mL) in an ACS carrier. Animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks, and the tibiae containing the DBBM blocks were dissected and analyzed radiographically (microcomputed tomography [micro-CT]), histologically, and immunohistochemically.

Results: Micro-CT analysis showed a considerable increase in bone volume (BV) and BV/tissue volume in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with all the others. Trabeculae thickness also increased in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with the DBBM/ACS group. Trabecular number, separation, and bone mineral density were not different among groups. Histomorphometric evaluation showed increased newly formed bone in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with the DBBM and DBBM/ACS groups. The amount of residual bone graft was statistically higher in the rhBMP-2 groups compared with the DBBM/ACS group. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was more intense in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with the DBBM/ACS group. The immunopositivity for type 1 collagen tended to be higher in the two groups with rhBMP-2.

Conclusion: Collectively, the results of this study suggest that the addition of rhBMP-2 in an ACS carrier placed on top of the DBBM graft enhanced bone formation in this animal model.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/jomi.5959DOI Listing
September 2018

Regulation of Ghrelin Receptor by Periodontal Bacteria and .

Mediators Inflamm 2017 29;2017:4916971. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Section of Experimental Dento-Maxillo-Facial Medicine, Center of Dento-Maxillo-Facial Medicine, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

Ghrelin plays a major role in obesity-related diseases which have been shown to be associated with periodontitis. This study sought to analyze the expression of the functional receptor for ghrelin (GHS-R1a) in periodontal cells and tissues under microbial conditions and . The GHS-R1a expression in human periodontal cells challenged with the periodontopathogen , in gingival biopsies from periodontally healthy and diseased individuals, and from rats with and without ligature-induced periodontitis was analyzed by real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunofluorescence. induced an initial upregulation and subsequent downregulation of GHS-R1a in periodontal cells. In rat experimental periodontitis, the GHS-R1a expression at periodontitis sites was increased during the early stage of periodontitis, but significantly reduced afterwards, when compared with healthy sites. In human gingival biopsies, periodontally diseased sites showed a significantly lower GHS-R1a expression than the healthy sites. The expression of the functional ghrelin receptor in periodontal cells and tissues is modulated by periodontal bacteria. Due to the downregulation of the functional ghrelin receptor by long-term exposure to periodontal bacteria, the anti-inflammatory actions of ghrelin may be diminished in chronic periodontal infections, which could lead to an enhanced periodontal inflammation and tissue destruction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/4916971DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5727798PMC
August 2018

Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 expression during LPS-induced inflammation and bone loss in rats.

Braz Oral Res 2017 Sep 28;31:e75. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

This study aimed to characterize the dynamics of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS1) expression in a rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced periodontitis. Wistar rats in the experimental groups were injected three times/week with LPS from Escherichia coli on the palatal aspect of the first molars, and control animals were injected with vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline). Animals were sacrificed 7, 15, and 30 days after the first injection to analyze inflammation (stereometric analysis), bone loss (macroscopic analysis), gene expression (qRT-PCR), and protein expression/activation (Western blotting). The severity of inflammation and bone loss associated with LPS-induced periodontitis increased from day 7 to day 15, and it was sustained through day 30. Significant (p < 0.05) increases in SOCS1, RANKL, OPG, and IFN-γ gene expression were observed in the experimental group versus the control group at day 15. SOCS1 protein expression and STAT1 and NF-κB activation were increased throughout the 30-day experimental period. Gingival tissues affected by experimental periodontitis express SOCS1, indicating that this protein may potentially downregulate signaling events involved in inflammatory reactions and bone loss and thus may play a relevant role in the development and progression of periodontal disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1807-3107BOR-2017.vol31.0075DOI Listing
September 2017

Evaluation of physicochemical properties of root-end filling materials using conventional and Micro-CT tests.

J Appl Oral Sci 2017 Jul-Aug;25(4):374-380

Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Odontologia, Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Araraquara, SP, Brasil.

Objective: To evaluate solubility, dimensional stability, filling ability and volumetric change of root-end filling materials using conventional tests and new Micro-CT-based methods.

Material And Methods: 7.

Results: The results suggested correlated or complementary data between the proposed tests. At 7 days, BIO showed higher solubility and at 30 days, showed higher volumetric change in comparison with MTA (p<0.05). With regard to volumetric change, the tested materials were similar (p>0.05) at 7 days. At 30 days, they presented similar solubility. BIO and MTA showed higher dimensional stability than ZOE (p<0.05). ZOE and BIO showed higher filling ability (p<0.05).

Conclusions: ZOE presented a higher dimensional change, and BIO had greater solubility after 7 days. BIO presented filling ability and dimensional stability, but greater volumetric change than MTA after 30 days. Micro-CT can provide important data on the physicochemical properties of materials complementing conventional tests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1678-7757-2016-0454DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5595109PMC
October 2017

Analysis of polymorphisms in Interleukin 10, NOS2A, and ESR2 genes in chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

Braz Oral Res 2016 Oct 10;30(1):e105. Epub 2016 Oct 10.

Universidade Federal do Ceará - UFC, Faculty of Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing, Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.

The objective of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL10, NOS2A, and ESR2 genes and chronic periodontitis (CP) and aggressive periodontitis (AgP). Three groups of patients underwent periodontal and radiographic evaluations: CP (n = 61), AgP (n = 50), and periodontally healthy (control group=61). Genomic DNA was extracted from oral epithelial cells and used for genotyping by real-time polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan® probes. The investigated SNPs were: -1087G > A, -819C > T and -592C > A in the IL10; +2087G > A in the NOS2A, and +1730G > A in the ESR2 gene. Differences in genotype and allele frequencies of each polymorphism and some individual characteristics were analyzed using the chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Analysis of SNPs and haplotypes in the IL10 and SNP in the ESR2 gene did not present any significant association with AgP or CP. The +2087G allele of the NOS2A gene tended to be significantly associated with periodontal disease. Patients carrying the genotype +2087GG in the NOS2A gene were genetically protected against the development of CP (p = 0.05; OR = 0.44; 95%CI = 0.20-0.95). This result showed greater significance when patients with AgP and CP were combined (total PD) (p = 0.03; OR = 0.46; 95%CI = 0.23-0.92). In conclusion, the studied Brazilian population had a significantly higher frequency of the GG genotype for the +2087 SNP in the NOS2A gene in individuals without periodontitis, although statistical significance was not maintained after multiple logistic regression.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1807-3107BOR-2016.vol30.0105DOI Listing
October 2016

Contribution of biomechanical forces to inflammation-induced bone resorption.

J Clin Periodontol 2017 01 16;44(1):31-41. Epub 2016 Dec 16.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of biomechanical loading to inflammation-induced tissue destruction.

Materials And Methods: A total of 144 adult Holtzman rats were randomly assigned into four experimental groups: control (C), ligature-induced periodontal disease (P), orthodontic movement (OM), and combination group (OMP). On days 1, 3, 7, and 15, following baseline, nine animals from each experimental group were killed. Bone volume fraction (BVF) and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured using micro-computed tomography. Expression and synthesis profile of cytokines and receptors of inflammation in gingival tissues were evaluated by PCR array assay and multiplex immunoassay.

Results: At 15 days, the OMP group presented a significantly (p < 0.05) lower BVF and BMD levels when compared to all the other groups. The OMP group presented the highest number of upregulated protein targets in comparison to the other groups. Furthermore, the gene expression and protein levels of CCL2, CCL3, IL-1β, IL1-α, IL-18, TNF-α, and VEGF were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the OMP group when compared to the P group.

Conclusions: In summary, mechanical loading modulates the inflammatory response of periodontal tissues to periodontal disease by increasing the expression of several pro-inflammatory mediators and receptors, which leads to increased bone resorption.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpe.12636DOI Listing
January 2017

Rheumatoid Arthritis Exacerbates the Severity of Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (ONJ) in Mice. A Randomized, Prospective, Controlled Animal Study.

J Bone Miner Res 2016 08 4;31(8):1596-607. Epub 2016 May 4.

Division of Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune inflammatory disorder, results in persistent synovitis with severe bone and cartilage destruction. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are often utilized in RA patients to reduce bone destruction and manage osteoporosis. However, BPs, especially at high doses, are associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Here, utilizing previously published ONJ animal models, we are exploring interactions between RA and ONJ incidence and severity. DBA1/J mice were divided into four groups: control, zoledronic acid (ZA), collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), and CIA-ZA. Animals were pretreated with vehicle or ZA. Bovine collagen II emulsified in Freund's adjuvant was injected to induce arthritis (CIA) and the mandibular molar crowns were drilled to induce periapical disease. Vehicle or ZA treatment continued for 8 weeks. ONJ indices were measured by micro-CT (µCT) and histological examination of maxillae and mandibles. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, and by µCT and histology of interphalangeal and knee joints. Maxillae and mandibles of control and CIA mice showed bone loss, periodontal ligament (PDL) space widening, lamina dura loss, and cortex thinning. ZA prevented these changes in both ZA and CIA-ZA groups. Epithelial to alveolar crest distance was increased in the control and CIA mice. This distance was preserved in ZA and CIA-ZA animals. Empty osteocytic lacunae and areas of osteonecrosis were present in ZA and CIA-ZA but more extensively in CIA-ZA animals, indicating more severe ONJ. CIA and CIA-ZA groups developed severe arthritis in the paws and knees. Interphalangeal and knee joints of CIA mice showed advanced bone destruction with cortical erosions and trabecular bone loss, and ZA treatment reduced these effects. Importantly, no osteonecrosis was noted adjacent to areas of articular inflammation in CIA-ZA mice. Our data suggest that ONJ burden was more pronounced in ZA treated CIA mice and that RA could be a risk factor for ONJ development. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.2827DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4970902PMC
August 2016

Effect of Subgingival Irrigation with Different Substances in the Treatment of Periodontal Disease. A Histometric Study in Rats.

J Int Acad Periodontol 2016 Jan 14;18(1):2-6. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

Department of Dentistry II, School of Dentistry at São Luís, Maranhão Federal University, São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the histometric effects of subgingival irrigation with different solutions as adjuvant for the treatment of periodontal disease in rats. Periodontal disease was induced by ligature in the first lower molars of 91 Wistar rats over the course of 28 days. After removal of the ligatures, the animals were subjected to scaling and root planing, followed by subgingival irrigation with different solutions (0.9% saline, 0.2% chlorhexidine, 0.1% and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite and 11% propolis extract). The animals were sacrificed 7 and 14 days after the treatment and tissue was processed for histometric analysis for evaluation of bone support and epithelial migration. The histometric analysis showed no statistically significant differences between the group treated with scaling and groups treated with subgingival irrigation (p > 0.05) regarding bone support and epithelial migration. Similarly, significant differences were not found among the different solutions used for subgingival irrigation. This study agrees with the position of the American Academy of Periodontology, which states that there is insufficient evidence to indicate the routine use of subgingival irrigation as adjuvant to periodontal treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2016

Long-term evaluation of oral gavage with periodontopathogens or ligature induction of experimental periodontal disease in mice.

Clin Oral Investig 2016 Jul 28;20(6):1203-16. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University, Rua Humaita, 1680, Centro, 14801-903, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

Objective: To evaluate in long-term periods the destruction of periodontal tissues and bacterial colonization induced by oral gavage with periodontopathogens or ligature experimental periodontal disease models.

Material And Methods: Forty-eight C57BL/6 J mice were divided into four groups: group C: negative control; group L: ligature; group G-Pg: oral gavage with Porphyromonas gingivalis; and group G-PgFn: oral gavage with Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. Mice were infected by oral gavage five times in 2-day intervals. After 45 and 60 days, animals were sacrificed and the immune-inflammatory response in the periodontal tissue was assessed by stereometric analysis. The alveolar bone loss was evaluated by live microcomputed tomography and histometric analysis. qPCR was used to confirm the bacterial colonization in all the groups. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and ANOVA tests, at 5 % of significance level.

Results: Ligature model induced inflammation and bone resorption characterized by increased number of inflammatory cells and decreased number of fibroblasts, followed by advanced alveolar bone loss at 45 and 60 days (p < 0.05). Bacterial colonization in groups G-Pg and G-PgFn was confirmed by qPCR but inflammation and bone resorption were not observed (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The ligature model but not the oral gavage models were effective to induce inflammation and bone loss in long-term periods. Pg colonization was observed in all models of experimental periodontal disease induction, independent of tissue alterations. These mice models of periodontitis validates, compliments, and enhances published PD models that utilize ligature or oral gavage and supports the importance of a successful colonization of a susceptible host, a bacterial invasion into vulnerable tissue, and host-bacterial interactions that lead to tissue destruction.

Clinical Relevance: The ligature model was an effective approach to induce inflammation and bone loss similar to human periodontitis, but the oral gavage models were not efficient in inducing periodontal inflammation and tissue destruction in the conditions studied. Ligature models can provide a basis for future interventional studies that contribute to the understanding of the disease pathogenesis and the complex host response to microbial challenge.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-015-1607-0DOI Listing
July 2016

Obesity and Hyperlipidemia Modulate Alveolar Bone Loss in Wistar Rats.

J Periodontol 2016 Feb 17;87(2):e9-17. Epub 2015 Sep 17.

Department of Periodontology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Background: A positive association between obesity-associated metabolic disorders (e.g., hyperlipidemia and diabetes) and periodontitis has been demonstrated in the literature. This study evaluates the role of cafeteria diet-induced obesity/hyperlipidemia (CAF) on alveolar bone loss (ABL) in rats.

Methods: Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: control, periodontitis (PERIO), obesity/hyperlipidemia (CAF), and obesity/hyperlipidemia plus periodontitis (CAF+PERIO). Groups CAF and CAF+PERIO were exposed to a high-fat, hypercaloric diet. At week 12, periodontal disease was induced in groups PERIO and CAF+PERIO by ligatures in the upper second molar. The contralateral tooth was considered the intragroup control. Body weight and Lee index were evaluated weekly during the experiment. Serum glucose and cholesterol/triglycerides in the liver were evaluated, and percentage of ABL was measured by microcomputed tomography. Serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at week 17.

Results: Body weight, Lee index, and cholesterol/triglycerides in the liver increased in groups exposed to the cafeteria diet. Groups PERIO and CAF+PERIO exhibited a significantly higher ABL compared to control and CAF groups. The presence of obesity and hyperlipidemia significantly increased ABL in the CAF+PERIO group compared to the PERIO group (53.60 ± 3.44 versus 42.78 ± 7.27, respectively) in the sides with ligature. Groups exposed to CAF exhibited higher ABL in the sides without ligature. No differences were observed among groups for IL-1β and TNF-α.

Conclusion: Obesity and hyperlipidemia modulate the host response to challenges in the periodontium, increasing the expression of periodontal breakdown.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/jop.2015.150330DOI Listing
February 2016

Reconstruction of the Alveolar Buccal Bone Plate in Compromised Fresh Socket after Immediate Implant Placement Followed by Immediate Provisionalization.

J Esthet Restor Dent 2015 May-Jun;27(3):122-35. Epub 2015 Jun 1.

Department of Social Dentistry, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Univ Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

Objective: The aim of this clinical report was to reestablish the buccal bone wall after immediate implant placement. The socket defect was corrected with autogenous bone, and a connective tissue graft was removed from the maxillary tuberosity to increase the thickness, height, and width of the buccal bone and gingival tissue followed by immediate provisionalization of the crown during the same operation.

Clinical Considerations: A 66-year-old patient presented with a hopeless maxillary left central incisor with loss of the buccal bone wall. Atraumatic, flapless extraction was performed, and an immediate implant was placed in the extraction socket followed by preparation of an immediate provisional restoration. Subsequently, immediate reconstruction of the buccal bone plate was performed, using the tuberosity as the donor site, to obtain block bone and connective tissue grafts, as well as particulate bone. Finally, immediate provisionalization of the crown followed by simple sutures was performed. Cone-beam computed tomography and periapical radiographs were taken before and after surgery. After 4 months, the final prosthetic crown was made. After a 2-year follow-up, a satisfactory aesthetic result was achieved with lower treatment time and morbidity.

Conclusion: This case demonstrates the effective use of immediate reconstruction of the buccal bone wall for the treatment of a hopeless tooth in the maxillary aesthetic area. This procedure efficiently promoted harmonious gingival and bone architecture, recovered lost anatomical structures with sufficient width and thickness, and maintained the stability of the alveolar bone crest in a single procedure.

Clinical Significance: If appropriate clinical conditions exist, immediate dentoalveolar restoration may be the most conservative means of reconstructing the buccal bone wall after immediate implant placement followed by immediate provisionalization with predictable healing and lower treatment time.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jerd.12154DOI Listing
January 2017

Improvement of an anterior infrabone defect using combined periodontal and orthodontic therapy: A 6-year follow-up case report.

Eur J Dent 2014 Jul;8(3):407-411

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, University of Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

Extensive intraosseous lesions represent a clinical challenge for the periodontist. Sites with bone defects have been shown to be at higher risk of periodontitis progression in patients who had not received periodontal therapy. Thus, the aim of this case report was to describe a novel approach for the treatment of 1-walled intraosseous defect by combining nonsurgical periodontal therapy and orthodontic movement toward the bone defect, avoiding regenerative and surgical procedures. A 47-year-old woman underwent the proposed procedures for the treatment of her left central incisor with 9 mm probing depth and 1-walled intraosseous defect in its mesial aspect. Initially, basic periodontal therapy with scaling and root planning was accomplished. Two months later, an orthodontic treatment was planned to eliminate the intraosseous lesion and to improve the interproximal papillary area. Orthodontic root movement toward the osseous defect was performed for 13 months with light forces. After 6 years postoperative it was concluded that combined basic periodontal therapy and orthodontic movement was capable of eliminating the intraosseous defect and improve the esthetics in the interproximal papillary area between the central incisors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1305-7456.137657DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4144142PMC
July 2014

Leptin effects on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal cells.

Int J Endocrinol 2014 22;2014:180304. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Experimental Dento-Maxillo-Facial Medicine, University of Bonn, 53111 Bonn, Germany ; Clinical Research Unit 208, University of Bonn, 53111 Bonn, Germany.

Obesity is increasing throughout the globe and characterized by excess adipose tissue, which represents a complex endocrine organ. Adipose tissue secrets bioactive molecules called adipokines, which act at endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine levels. Obesity has recently been shown to be associated with periodontitis, a disease characterized by the irreversible destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, that is, periodontium, and also with compromised periodontal healing. Although the underlying mechanisms for these associations are not clear yet, increased levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, as found in obese individuals, might be a critical pathomechanistic link. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of leptin on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and also to study the local leptin production by these cells. Leptin caused a significant downregulation of growth (TGFβ1, and VEGFA) and transcription (RUNX2) factors as well as matrix molecules (collagen, and periostin) and inhibited SMAD signaling under regenerative conditions. Moreover, the local expression of leptin and its full-length receptor was significantly downregulated by inflammatory, microbial, and biomechanical signals. This study demonstrates that the hormone leptin negatively interferes with the regenerative capacity of PDL cells, suggesting leptin as a pathomechanistic link between obesity and compromised periodontal healing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/180304DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4129942PMC
August 2014

Relevance of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) on RANKL, OPG, and nod expressions induced by TLR and IL-1R signaling in bone marrow stromal cells.

Inflammation 2015 Feb;38(1):1-8

School of Dentistry, Federal University at Pelotas (UFPel), Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) plays a pivotal role in Toll-like receptor (TLR)- and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-induced osteoclastogenesis. We examined the role of MyD88 on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell (NF-κB) activation and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod) induction by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL-1 beta, and their effect on receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) production in bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC). RANKL, Nod1, Nod2, NF-κB, and p38 protein levels were determined by Western blot. Nod2 was stimulated with muramyl dipeptide (MDP) prior to TLR4 stimulation with LPS. MyD88 deficiency markedly inhibited RANKL expression after LPS stimulation and increased OPG messenger RNA (mRNA) production. Also, MyD88 was necessary for NF-κB and p38 MAPK activation. MDP alone did not induce RANKL and OPG expressions; however, when combined with LPS, their expressions were significantly increased (p < 0.05). Our results support that MyD88 signaling has a pivotal role in osteoclastogenesis thought NF-κB and p38 activation. Nod2 and especially Nod1 levels were influenced by MyD88.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10753-014-0001-4DOI Listing
February 2015