Publications by authors named "Jonathan Marten"

46 Publications

Genetic insights into biological mechanisms governing human ovarian ageing.

Nature 2021 08 4;596(7872):393-397. Epub 2021 Aug 4.

Genome Integrity and Instability Group, Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain.

Reproductive longevity is essential for fertility and influences healthy ageing in women, but insights into its underlying biological mechanisms and treatments to preserve it are limited. Here we identify 290 genetic determinants of ovarian ageing, assessed using normal variation in age at natural menopause (ANM) in about 200,000 women of European ancestry. These common alleles were associated with clinical extremes of ANM; women in the top 1% of genetic susceptibility have an equivalent risk of premature ovarian insufficiency to those carrying monogenic FMR1 premutations. The identified loci implicate a broad range of DNA damage response (DDR) processes and include loss-of-function variants in key DDR-associated genes. Integration with experimental models demonstrates that these DDR processes act across the life-course to shape the ovarian reserve and its rate of depletion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that experimental manipulation of DDR pathways highlighted by human genetics increases fertility and extends reproductive life in mice. Causal inference analyses using the identified genetic variants indicate that extending reproductive life in women improves bone health and reduces risk of type 2 diabetes, but increases the risk of hormone-sensitive cancers. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms that govern ovarian ageing, when they act, and how they might be targeted by therapeutic approaches to extend fertility and prevent disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03779-7DOI Listing
August 2021

Multi-ancestry GWAS of the electrocardiographic PR interval identifies 202 loci underlying cardiac conduction.

Nat Commun 2020 05 21;11(1):2542. Epub 2020 May 21.

Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

The electrocardiographic PR interval reflects atrioventricular conduction, and is associated with conduction abnormalities, pacemaker implantation, atrial fibrillation (AF), and cardiovascular mortality. Here we report a multi-ancestry (N = 293,051) genome-wide association meta-analysis for the PR interval, discovering 202 loci of which 141 have not previously been reported. Variants at identified loci increase the percentage of heritability explained, from 33.5% to 62.6%. We observe enrichment for cardiac muscle developmental/contractile and cytoskeletal genes, highlighting key regulation processes for atrioventricular conduction. Additionally, 8 loci not previously reported harbor genes underlying inherited arrhythmic syndromes and/or cardiomyopathies suggesting a role for these genes in cardiovascular pathology in the general population. We show that polygenic predisposition to PR interval duration is an endophenotype for cardiovascular disease, including distal conduction disease, AF, and atrioventricular pre-excitation. These findings advance our understanding of the polygenic basis of cardiac conduction, and the genetic relationship between PR interval duration and cardiovascular disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15706-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7242331PMC
May 2020

Smoking-by-genotype interaction in type 2 diabetes risk and fasting glucose.

PLoS One 2020 7;15(5):e0230815. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America.

Smoking is a potentially causal behavioral risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but not all smokers develop T2D. It is unknown whether genetic factors partially explain this variation. We performed genome-environment-wide interaction studies to identify loci exhibiting potential interaction with baseline smoking status (ever vs. never) on incident T2D and fasting glucose (FG). Analyses were performed in participants of European (EA) and African ancestry (AA) separately. Discovery analyses were conducted using genotype data from the 50,000-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ITMAT-Broad-CARe (IBC) array in 5 cohorts from from the Candidate Gene Association Resource Consortium (n = 23,189). Replication was performed in up to 16 studies from the Cohorts for Heart Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium (n = 74,584). In meta-analysis of discovery and replication estimates, 5 SNPs met at least one criterion for potential interaction with smoking on incident T2D at p<1x10-7 (adjusted for multiple hypothesis-testing with the IBC array). Two SNPs had significant joint effects in the overall model and significant main effects only in one smoking stratum: rs140637 (FBN1) in AA individuals had a significant main effect only among smokers, and rs1444261 (closest gene C2orf63) in EA individuals had a significant main effect only among nonsmokers. Three additional SNPs were identified as having potential interaction by exhibiting a significant main effects only in smokers: rs1801232 (CUBN) in AA individuals, rs12243326 (TCF7L2) in EA individuals, and rs4132670 (TCF7L2) in EA individuals. No SNP met significance for potential interaction with smoking on baseline FG. The identification of these loci provides evidence for genetic interactions with smoking exposure that may explain some of the heterogeneity in the association between smoking and T2D.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0230815PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7205201PMC
August 2020

Gene-educational attainment interactions in a multi-ancestry genome-wide meta-analysis identify novel blood pressure loci.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Jun 5;26(6):2111-2125. Epub 2020 May 5.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.

Educational attainment is widely used as a surrogate for socioeconomic status (SES). Low SES is a risk factor for hypertension and high blood pressure (BP). To identify novel BP loci, we performed multi-ancestry meta-analyses accounting for gene-educational attainment interactions using two variables, "Some College" (yes/no) and "Graduated College" (yes/no). Interactions were evaluated using both a 1 degree of freedom (DF) interaction term and a 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Analyses were performed for systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure. We pursued genome-wide interrogation in Stage 1 studies (N = 117 438) and follow-up on promising variants in Stage 2 studies (N = 293 787) in five ancestry groups. Through combined meta-analyses of Stages 1 and 2, we identified 84 known and 18 novel BP loci at genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10). Two novel loci were identified based on the 1DF test of interaction with educational attainment, while the remaining 16 loci were identified through the 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Ten novel loci were identified in individuals of African ancestry. Several novel loci show strong biological plausibility since they involve physiologic systems implicated in BP regulation. They include genes involved in the central nervous system-adrenal signaling axis (ZDHHC17, CADPS, PIK3C2G), vascular structure and function (GNB3, CDON), and renal function (HAS2 and HAS2-AS1, SLIT3). Collectively, these findings suggest a role of educational attainment or SES in further dissection of the genetic architecture of BP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-0719-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7641978PMC
June 2021

Multi-ancestry sleep-by-SNP interaction analysis in 126,926 individuals reveals lipid loci stratified by sleep duration.

Nat Commun 2019 11 12;10(1):5121. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Both short and long sleep are associated with an adverse lipid profile, likely through different biological pathways. To elucidate the biology of sleep-associated adverse lipid profile, we conduct multi-ancestry genome-wide sleep-SNP interaction analyses on three lipid traits (HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). In the total study sample (discovery + replication) of 126,926 individuals from 5 different ancestry groups, when considering either long or short total sleep time interactions in joint analyses, we identify 49 previously unreported lipid loci, and 10 additional previously unreported lipid loci in a restricted sample of European-ancestry cohorts. In addition, we identify new gene-sleep interactions for known lipid loci such as LPL and PCSK9. The previously unreported lipid loci have a modest explained variance in lipid levels: most notable, gene-short-sleep interactions explain 4.25% of the variance in triglyceride level. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in sleep-associated adverse lipid profiles.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12958-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6851116PMC
November 2019

Target genes, variants, tissues and transcriptional pathways influencing human serum urate levels.

Nat Genet 2019 10 2;51(10):1459-1474. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Elevated serum urate levels cause gout and correlate with cardiometabolic diseases via poorly understood mechanisms. We performed a trans-ancestry genome-wide association study of serum urate in 457,690 individuals, identifying 183 loci (147 previously unknown) that improve the prediction of gout in an independent cohort of 334,880 individuals. Serum urate showed significant genetic correlations with many cardiometabolic traits, with genetic causality analyses supporting a substantial role for pleiotropy. Enrichment analysis, fine-mapping of urate-associated loci and colocalization with gene expression in 47 tissues implicated the kidney and liver as the main target organs and prioritized potentially causal genes and variants, including the transcriptional master regulators in the liver and kidney, HNF1A and HNF4A. Experimental validation showed that HNF4A transactivated the promoter of ABCG2, encoding a major urate transporter, in kidney cells, and that HNF4A p.Thr139Ile is a functional variant. Transcriptional coregulation within and across organs may be a general mechanism underlying the observed pleiotropy between urate and cardiometabolic traits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0504-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6858555PMC
October 2019

Genome-wide association meta-analyses and fine-mapping elucidate pathways influencing albuminuria.

Nat Commun 2019 09 11;10(1):4130. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Increased levels of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) are associated with higher risk of kidney disease progression and cardiovascular events, but underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we conduct trans-ethnic (n = 564,257) and European-ancestry specific meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of UACR, including ancestry- and diabetes-specific analyses, and identify 68 UACR-associated loci. Genetic correlation analyses and risk score associations in an independent electronic medical records database (n = 192,868) reveal connections with proteinuria, hyperlipidemia, gout, and hypertension. Fine-mapping and trans-Omics analyses with gene expression in 47 tissues and plasma protein levels implicate genes potentially operating through differential expression in kidney (including TGFB1, MUC1, PRKCI, and OAF), and allow coupling of UACR associations to altered plasma OAF concentrations. Knockdown of OAF and PRKCI orthologs in Drosophila nephrocytes reduces albumin endocytosis. Silencing fly PRKCI further impairs slit diaphragm formation. These results generate a priority list of genes and pathways for translational research to reduce albuminuria.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11576-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739370PMC
September 2019

A catalog of genetic loci associated with kidney function from analyses of a million individuals.

Nat Genet 2019 06 31;51(6):957-972. Epub 2019 May 31.

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease-Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Clincial Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is responsible for a public health burden with multi-systemic complications. Through trans-ancestry meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and independent replication (n = 1,046,070), we identified 264 associated loci (166 new). Of these, 147 were likely to be relevant for kidney function on the basis of associations with the alternative kidney function marker blood urea nitrogen (n = 416,178). Pathway and enrichment analyses, including mouse models with renal phenotypes, support the kidney as the main target organ. A genetic risk score for lower eGFR was associated with clinically diagnosed CKD in 452,264 independent individuals. Colocalization analyses of associations with eGFR among 783,978 European-ancestry individuals and gene expression across 46 human tissues, including tubulo-interstitial and glomerular kidney compartments, identified 17 genes differentially expressed in kidney. Fine-mapping highlighted missense driver variants in 11 genes and kidney-specific regulatory variants. These results provide a comprehensive priority list of molecular targets for translational research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0407-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6698888PMC
June 2019

A multi-ancestry genome-wide study incorporating gene-smoking interactions identifies multiple new loci for pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

Hum Mol Genet 2019 08;28(15):2615-2633

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P < 5 × 10-8, false discovery rate < 0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddz070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6644157PMC
August 2019

New genetic signals for lung function highlight pathways and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associations across multiple ancestries.

Nat Genet 2019 03 25;51(3):481-493. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Reduced lung function predicts mortality and is key to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a genome-wide association study in 400,102 individuals of European ancestry, we define 279 lung function signals, 139 of which are new. In combination, these variants strongly predict COPD in independent populations. Furthermore, the combined effect of these variants showed generalizability across smokers and never smokers, and across ancestral groups. We highlight biological pathways, known and potential drug targets for COPD and, in phenome-wide association studies, autoimmune-related and other pleiotropic effects of lung function-associated variants. This new genetic evidence has potential to improve future preventive and therapeutic strategies for COPD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0321-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397078PMC
March 2019

Protein-coding variants implicate novel genes related to lipid homeostasis contributing to body-fat distribution.

Nat Genet 2019 03 18;51(3):452-469. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Body-fat distribution is a risk factor for adverse cardiovascular health consequences. We analyzed the association of body-fat distribution, assessed by waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index, with 228,985 predicted coding and splice site variants available on exome arrays in up to 344,369 individuals from five major ancestries (discovery) and 132,177 European-ancestry individuals (validation). We identified 15 common (minor allele frequency, MAF ≥5%) and nine low-frequency or rare (MAF <5%) coding novel variants. Pathway/gene set enrichment analyses identified lipid particle, adiponectin, abnormal white adipose tissue physiology and bone development and morphology as important contributors to fat distribution, while cross-trait associations highlight cardiometabolic traits. In functional follow-up analyses, specifically in Drosophila RNAi-knockdowns, we observed a significant increase in the total body triglyceride levels for two genes (DNAH10 and PLXND1). We implicate novel genes in fat distribution, stressing the importance of interrogating low-frequency and protein-coding variants.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0334-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560635PMC
March 2019

Multi-ancestry study of blood lipid levels identifies four loci interacting with physical activity.

Nat Commun 2019 01 22;10(1):376. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Laboratory of Genetics and Molecular Cardiology, Heart Institute (InCor), University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, 01246903, SP, Brazil.

Many genetic loci affect circulating lipid levels, but it remains unknown whether lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, modify these genetic effects. To identify lipid loci interacting with physical activity, we performed genome-wide analyses of circulating HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in up to 120,979 individuals of European, African, Asian, Hispanic, and Brazilian ancestry, with follow-up of suggestive associations in an additional 131,012 individuals. We find four loci, in/near CLASP1, LHX1, SNTA1, and CNTNAP2, that are associated with circulating lipid levels through interaction with physical activity; higher levels of physical activity enhance the HDL cholesterol-increasing effects of the CLASP1, LHX1, and SNTA1 loci and attenuate the LDL cholesterol-increasing effect of the CNTNAP2 locus. The CLASP1, LHX1, and SNTA1 regions harbor genes linked to muscle function and lipid metabolism. Our results elucidate the role of physical activity interactions in the genetic contribution to blood lipid levels.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-08008-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342931PMC
January 2019

A genome-wide association study identifies new loci for factor VII and implicates factor VII in ischemic stroke etiology.

Blood 2019 02 14;133(9):967-977. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD.

Factor VII (FVII) is an important component of the coagulation cascade. Few genetic loci regulating FVII activity and/or levels have been discovered to date. We conducted a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies of plasma FVII levels (7 FVII activity and 2 FVII antigen) among 27 495 participants of European and African ancestry. Each study performed ancestry-specific association analyses. Inverse variance weighted meta-analysis was performed within each ancestry group and then combined for a -ancestry meta-analysis. Our primary analysis included the 7 studies that measured FVII activity, and a secondary analysis included all 9 studies. We provided functional genomic validation for newly identified significant loci by silencing candidate genes in a human liver cell line (HuH7) using small-interfering RNA and then measuring messenger RNA and FVII protein expression. Lastly, we used meta-analysis results to perform Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of FVII activity on coronary artery disease, ischemic stroke (IS), and venous thromboembolism. We identified 2 novel ( and ) and 6 known loci associated with FVII activity, explaining 19.0% of the phenotypic variance. Adding FVII antigen data to the meta-analysis did not result in the discovery of further loci. Silencing in HuH7 cells upregulated FVII, whereas silencing downregulated FVII. Mendelian randomization analyses suggest that FVII activity has a positive causal effect on the risk of IS. Variants at and contribute to FVII activity by regulating expression levels. FVII activity appears to contribute to the etiology of IS in the general population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2018-05-849240DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396174PMC
February 2019

Meta-analysis of up to 622,409 individuals identifies 40 novel smoking behaviour associated genetic loci.

Mol Psychiatry 2020 10 7;25(10):2392-2409. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Smoking is a major heritable and modifiable risk factor for many diseases, including cancer, common respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Fourteen genetic loci have previously been associated with smoking behaviour-related traits. We tested up to 235,116 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the exome-array for association with smoking initiation, cigarettes per day, pack-years, and smoking cessation in a fixed effects meta-analysis of up to 61 studies (up to 346,813 participants). In a subset of 112,811 participants, a further one million SNVs were also genotyped and tested for association with the four smoking behaviour traits. SNV-trait associations with P < 5 × 10 in either analysis were taken forward for replication in up to 275,596 independent participants from UK Biobank. Lastly, a meta-analysis of the discovery and replication studies was performed. Sixteen SNVs were associated with at least one of the smoking behaviour traits (P < 5 × 10) in the discovery samples. Ten novel SNVs, including rs12616219 near TMEM182, were followed-up and five of them (rs462779 in REV3L, rs12780116 in CNNM2, rs1190736 in GPR101, rs11539157 in PJA1, and rs12616219 near TMEM182) replicated at a Bonferroni significance threshold (P < 4.5 × 10) with consistent direction of effect. A further 35 SNVs were associated with smoking behaviour traits in the discovery plus replication meta-analysis (up to 622,409 participants) including a rare SNV, rs150493199, in CCDC141 and two low-frequency SNVs in CEP350 and HDGFRP2. Functional follow-up implied that decreased expression of REV3L may lower the probability of smoking initiation. The novel loci will facilitate understanding the genetic aetiology of smoking behaviour and may lead to the identification of potential drug targets for smoking prevention and/or cessation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-018-0313-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7515840PMC
October 2020

Genome-Wide Association Transethnic Meta-Analyses Identifies Novel Associations Regulating Coagulation Factor VIII and von Willebrand Factor Plasma Levels.

Circulation 2019 01;139(5):620-635

Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences (P.W.), University of Glasgow, UK.

Background: Factor VIII (FVIII) and its carrier protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) are associated with risk of arterial and venous thrombosis and with hemorrhagic disorders. We aimed to identify and functionally test novel genetic associations regulating plasma FVIII and VWF.

Methods: We meta-analyzed genome-wide association results from 46 354 individuals of European, African, East Asian, and Hispanic ancestry. All studies performed linear regression analysis using an additive genetic model and associated ≈35 million imputed variants with natural log-transformed phenotype levels. In vitro gene silencing in cultured endothelial cells was performed for candidate genes to provide additional evidence on association and function. Two-sample Mendelian randomization analyses were applied to test the causal role of FVIII and VWF plasma levels on the risk of arterial and venous thrombotic events.

Results: We identified 13 novel genome-wide significant ( P≤2.5×10) associations, 7 with FVIII levels ( FCHO2/TMEM171/TNPO1, HLA, SOX17/RP1, LINC00583/NFIB, RAB5C-KAT2A, RPL3/TAB1/SYNGR1, and ARSA) and 11 with VWF levels ( PDHB/PXK/KCTD6, SLC39A8, FCHO2/TMEM171/TNPO1, HLA, GIMAP7/GIMAP4, OR13C5/NIPSNAP, DAB2IP, C2CD4B, RAB5C-KAT2A, TAB1/SYNGR1, and ARSA), beyond 10 previously reported associations with these phenotypes. Functional validation provided further evidence of association for all loci on VWF except ARSA and DAB2IP. Mendelian randomization suggested causal effects of plasma FVIII activity levels on venous thrombosis and coronary artery disease risk and plasma VWF levels on ischemic stroke risk.

Conclusions: The meta-analysis identified 13 novel genetic loci regulating FVIII and VWF plasma levels, 10 of which we validated functionally. We provide some evidence for a causal role of these proteins in thrombotic events.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.034532DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6438386PMC
January 2019

Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.

Nat Genet 2018 10 17;50(10):1412-1425. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Laboratory of Genetics and Genomics, NIA/NIH, Baltimore, MD, USA.

High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We report the largest genetic association study of blood pressure traits (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) to date in over 1 million people of European ancestry. We identify 535 novel blood pressure loci that not only offer new biological insights into blood pressure regulation but also highlight shared genetic architecture between blood pressure and lifestyle exposures. Our findings identify new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation with potential for improved cardiovascular disease prevention in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0205-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284793PMC
October 2018

Meta-analysis of exome array data identifies six novel genetic loci for lung function.

Wellcome Open Res 2018 12;3. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA.

Over 90 regions of the genome have been associated with lung function to date, many of which have also been implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We carried out meta-analyses of exome array data and three lung function measures: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV ), forced vital capacity (FVC) and the ratio of FEV to FVC (FEV /FVC). These analyses by the SpiroMeta and CHARGE consortia included 60,749 individuals of European ancestry from 23 studies, and 7,721 individuals of African Ancestry from 5 studies in the discovery stage, with follow-up in up to 111,556 independent individuals. We identified significant (P<2·8x10 ) associations with six SNPs: a nonsynonymous variant in , which is predicted to be damaging, three intronic SNPs ( and ) and two intergenic SNPs near to and Expression quantitative trait loci analyses found evidence for regulation of gene expression at three signals and implicated several genes, including and . Further interrogation of these loci could provide greater understanding of the determinants of lung function and pulmonary disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12688/wellcomeopenres.12583.3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081985PMC
January 2018

Exome-chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci associated with cardiac conduction, including ADAMTS6.

Genome Biol 2018 07 17;19(1):87. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Clinical Pharmacology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK.

Background: Genome-wide association studies conducted on QRS duration, an electrocardiographic measurement associated with heart failure and sudden cardiac death, have led to novel biological insights into cardiac function. However, the variants identified fall predominantly in non-coding regions and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear.

Results: Here, we identify putative functional coding variation associated with changes in the QRS interval duration by combining Illumina HumanExome BeadChip genotype data from 77,898 participants of European ancestry and 7695 of African descent in our discovery cohort, followed by replication in 111,874 individuals of European ancestry from the UK Biobank and deCODE cohorts. We identify ten novel loci, seven within coding regions, including ADAMTS6, significantly associated with QRS duration in gene-based analyses. ADAMTS6 encodes a secreted metalloprotease of currently unknown function. In vitro validation analysis shows that the QRS-associated variants lead to impaired ADAMTS6 secretion and loss-of function analysis in mice demonstrates a previously unappreciated role for ADAMTS6 in connexin 43 gap junction expression, which is essential for myocardial conduction.

Conclusions: Our approach identifies novel coding and non-coding variants underlying ventricular depolarization and provides a possible mechanism for the ADAMTS6-associated conduction changes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-018-1457-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048820PMC
July 2018

Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries.

PLoS One 2018 18;13(6):e0198166. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for hypertension; the mechanism by which alcohol consumption impact blood pressure (BP) regulation remains unknown. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study accounting for gene-alcohol consumption interaction for BP might identify additional BP loci and contribute to the understanding of alcohol-related BP regulation. We conducted a large two-stage investigation incorporating joint testing of main genetic effects and single nucleotide variant (SNV)-alcohol consumption interactions. In Stage 1, genome-wide discovery meta-analyses in ≈131K individuals across several ancestry groups yielded 3,514 SNVs (245 loci) with suggestive evidence of association (P < 1.0 x 10-5). In Stage 2, these SNVs were tested for independent external replication in ≈440K individuals across multiple ancestries. We identified and replicated (at Bonferroni correction threshold) five novel BP loci (380 SNVs in 21 genes) and 49 previously reported BP loci (2,159 SNVs in 109 genes) in European ancestry, and in multi-ancestry meta-analyses (P < 5.0 x 10-8). For African ancestry samples, we detected 18 potentially novel BP loci (P < 5.0 x 10-8) in Stage 1 that warrant further replication. Additionally, correlated meta-analysis identified eight novel BP loci (11 genes). Several genes in these loci (e.g., PINX1, GATA4, BLK, FTO and GABBR2) have been previously reported to be associated with alcohol consumption. These findings provide insights into the role of alcohol consumption in the genetic architecture of hypertension.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198166PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6005576PMC
January 2019

ExomeChip-Wide Analysis of 95 626 Individuals Identifies 10 Novel Loci Associated With QT and JT Intervals.

Circ Genom Precis Med 2018 01;11(1):e001758

From the Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics (N.A.B.) and McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine (N.A.B., D.E.A.), Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine (J.A.B., J.C.B., T.A., N.S.), Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Services (B.M.P.), and Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology (S.R.H.), University of Washington, Seattle; Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur (A.V.S., V.G.); Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykavik (A.V.S., V.G.); Clinical Pharmacology Department, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and London School of Medicine and Dentistry (H.R.W., P.B.M.) and NIHR Barts Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (H.R.W., P.B.M.), Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom; Section of Computational Biomedicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, MA (H.L., Z.X.); School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht Center for Systems Biology and Department of Biochemistry, Maastricht University, The Netherlands (A.I.); Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology (A.I., C.M.v.D.) and Department of Medical Informatics (J.A.K.), Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Biostatistics Department, Boston University School of Public Health, MA (C.-T.L.); Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (J.M., C.H.), Medical Genetics Section, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (A.C.), and Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Informatics (I.R.), University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA (F.R., P.T.E., S.A.L., J.R.); Center for Human Genetic Research (F.R., J.R.), Cardiovascular Research Center (P.L.H., P.T.E., S.A.L.), and Center for Human Genetic Research and Cardiovascular Research Center (C.H.N.-C.), Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Department of Cardiovascular Sciences (L.M.H., C.P.N., N.J.S.) and Genetic Epidemiology Group, Department of Health Sciences (M.D.T.), University of Leicester, United Kingdom; NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (L.M.H., C.P.N.) and NIHR Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit (M.D.T.), Glenfield Hospital, United Kingdom; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (N.G., J.B.-J., T.H., O.P.), Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (A.L.), and Laboratory of Experimental Cardiology (J.K.K.), University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Data Science, School of Population Health (H.M.) and Physiology and Biophysics (J.G.W.), University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson; Institute of Genetic Epidemiology (M.M.-N.), Institute of Epidemiology II (A.P., M.W., S.P.), Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology (M.W.), and Institute of Human Genetics (T.M.), Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg; Department of Medicine I, University Hospital Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Germany (M.M.-N., M.F.S., S.K.); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Munich Heart Alliance (M.M.-N., M.F.S., A.P., T.M., S.K.); MRC Human Genetics Unit, MRC IGMM, University of Edinburgh, Scotland (J.E.H.); Department of Cardiology (N.V., R.A.d.B., P.v.d.M., P.v.d.H.) and Department of Internal Medicine (M.E.), University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences and Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance (X.G., J.Y., Y.-D.I.C.); Department of Clinical Epidemiology (R.L.-G., R.d.M.) and University of Split School of Medicine (I.K., O.P.), University of Split, Croatia; Departments of Cardiology (S.T., J.W.J., A.C.M.), Gerontology and Geriatrics (S.T.), and Public Health and Primary Care (D.O.M.-K.), Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; Departments of Medical Informatics (M.v.d.B.), Epidemiology (B.H.C.S.), and Epidemiology (M.E.), Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics, University Medicine and Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, Greifswald, Germany (S.W., U.V., G.H.); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald (S.W., U.V., H.V., S.B.F., M.D.); Cardiogenetics Lab, Genetics and Molecular Cell Sciences Research Centre, Cardiovascular and Cell Sciences Institute, St George's, University of London, United Kingdom (B.P.P., Y.J.); Division Heart and Lungs, Department of Cardiology, (J.v.S., F.W.A.) and Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care (M.L.B.), University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (J.H., C.K.); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, Tampere, Finland (L.-P.L., N.M., T.L.); Department of Clinical Physiology, Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere School of Medicine, Finland (M.K.); Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (M.L.); Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (A.A.); Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center (EPICARE), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (E.Z.S.); Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD (T.B.H., L.J.L.); Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom (S.P., A.D.); Institute of Medical Sciences, Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom (A.D.M.); Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen (A.L.); Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark (A.L.); German Center for Diabetes Research, Neuherberg (A.P.); Institute of Human Genetics, Technische Universität München, Germany (T.M.); Durrer Center for Cardiogenetic Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (J.W.J.); Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of Netherlands, Utrecht (J.W.J.); Inspectorate of Health Care, Utrecht, The Netherlands (B.H.C.S.); Human Genomics Facility (F.R.) and Human Genotyping Facility (A.U.), Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Institute for Community Medicine (H.V.) and Department of Internal Medicine B (S.B.F., M.D.), University Medicine Greifswald, Germany; Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, United Kingdom (M.M., T.D.S.); Stanford School of Medicine, CA (M.P.); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital and Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Finland (O.T.R.); Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge (C.H.N.-C.); NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Disease, United Kingdom (N.J.S.); Durrer Center for Cardiogenetic Research, ICIN-Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht (F.W.A.); and Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London, United Kingdom (F.W.A.).

Background: QT interval, measured through a standard ECG, captures the time it takes for the cardiac ventricles to depolarize and repolarize. JT interval is the component of the QT interval that reflects ventricular repolarization alone. Prolonged QT interval has been linked to higher risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

Methods And Results: We performed an ExomeChip-wide analysis for both QT and JT intervals, including 209 449 variants, both common and rare, in 17 341 genes from the Illumina Infinium HumanExome BeadChip. We identified 10 loci that modulate QT and JT interval duration that have not been previously reported in the literature using single-variant statistical models in a meta-analysis of 95 626 individuals from 23 cohorts (comprised 83 884 European ancestry individuals, 9610 blacks, 1382 Hispanics, and 750 Asians). This brings the total number of ventricular repolarization associated loci to 45. In addition, our approach of using coding variants has highlighted the role of 17 specific genes for involvement in ventricular repolarization, 7 of which are in novel loci.

Conclusions: Our analyses show a role for myocyte internal structure and interconnections in modulating QT interval duration, adding to previous known roles of potassium, sodium, and calcium ion regulation, as well as autonomic control. We anticipate that these discoveries will open new paths to the goal of making novel remedies for the prevention of lethal ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGEN.117.001758DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5992491PMC
January 2018

Common and Rare Coding Genetic Variation Underlying the Electrocardiographic PR Interval.

Circ Genom Precis Med 2018 05;11(5):e002037

Section of Computational Biomedicine (H.L.) and Section of Cardiovascular Medicine (E.J.B.), Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, MA. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's and Boston University's Framingham Heart Study, MA (H.L., E.J.B.). Department of Cardiology, Division Heart & Lungs, University Medical Center Utrecht, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands (J.v.S., F.W.A.). Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur (A.V.S., V.G.). Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (A.V.S., V.G.). Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine (N.A.B.) and McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine (D.E.A.), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. William Harvey Research Institute (H.R.W., P.B.M.) and NIHR Barts Cardiovascular Research Unit (H.R.W., P.B.M.), Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom. Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine (J.A.B., J.C.B., C.M.S.), Department of Biostatistics (K.M.R.), Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Division of Cardiology, Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology (N.S.), Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Services (B.M.P.), and Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology (S.R.H.), University of Washington, Seattle. Center for Human Genetic Research (F. Radmanesh, J.R.) and Cardiovascular Research Center (P.L.H., L.-C.W., H.S.J., W.H., A.H., N.R.T., P.T.E., S.A.L.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA (L.-C.W., P.T.E., S.A.L.). Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, United Kingdom (L.H., C.P.N., N.J.S.). NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, United Kingdom (L.H., C.P.N., N.J.S.). The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (N.G., J.B.-J., O. Pedersen, T.H.), Laboratory of Experimental Cardiology (J.K.K.), and Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (A.L.), University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Department of Medicine I, University Hospital Munich, Ludwig Maximilian's University Munich, Germany (M.M.-N., M.F.S., S.K.). Chair of Genetic Epidemiology, IBE, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Germany (K.S.). DZHK (German Cardiovascular Research Centre), Partner Site: Munich Heart Alliance, Germany (M.M.-N., M.F.S., A.P., T.M., S.K.). Institute of Genetic Epidemiology (M.M.-N., K.S.), Institute of Epidemiology II (A.P., M.W.), Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology (M.W.), and Institute of Human Genetics (T.M.), Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany. Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (T.B., J.M., C.H.) and Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics (I.R.), University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom. University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Cardiology, The Netherlands (N.V., R.A.d.B., P.v.d.M., P.v.d.H.). Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences and Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (H.J.L., Y.-D.I.C., J.Y., X.G., K.D.T., J.I.R.). Department of Clinical Epidemiology (R.L.-G., D.O.M.-K.) and Department of Cardiology (S.T., J.W.J.), Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands. Department of Medical Informatics (M.E.v.d.B.), Human Genomics Facility (F. Rivadeneira), Human Genotyping Facility (A.U.), and Department of Epidemiology (M.E., B.H. Stricker), Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics, University Medicine and Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Germany (S.W., G.H., U.V.). DZHK (German Cardiovascular Research Centre), Partner Site Greifswald, Germany (S.W., H.V., S.B.F., U.V., M.D.). Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (J.H., C.K.). Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences (L.-P.L., T.L.) and Department of Clinical Physiology, Tampere University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences (M.K.), University of Tampere, Finland. Department of Data Science (H.M.) and Physiology and Biophysics (J.G.W.), University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson. Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (T.B.H., L.J.L.). Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (M.L.). Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (A.A.). Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center (EPICARE), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (E.Z.S.). Medical Research Institute (J.M.C.) and Division of Population Health Sciences (B.H. Smith), Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, United Kingdom. Department of Medical Informatics (J.A.K.) and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology (C.M.v.D.), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. TCM Clinical Basis Institute, Zhejiang Chinese Medicine University, Hangzhou, China (Z.X., C.W.). Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, PA (J.W.M.). German Center for Diabetes Research, Neuherberg, Germany (A.P.). Institute of Human Genetics, Technische Universität München, Germany (T.M.). Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen (A.L.). Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, Denmark (A.L.). British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Scotland (S.P.). Institute for Community Medicine (H.V.) and Department of Internal Medicine B (S.B.F., M.D.), University Medicine Greifswald, Germany. Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, United Kingdom (M.M., T.D.S.). Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands (M.L.B.). Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA (M.P.). Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, and Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Finland (O.T.R.). Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington, Seattle (B.M.P., S.R.H.). Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Croatia (O. Polasek). Cardiogenetics Lab, Genetics and Molecular Cell Sciences Research Centre, Cardiovascular and Cell Sciences Institute, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, United Kingdom (B.P.P., Y.J.). Durrer Center for Cardiovascular Research, Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands (F.W.A.). Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London, London, United Kingdom (F.W.A.). Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research and Institute of Health Informatics, University College London, London, United Kingdom; CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht Centre for Systems Biology (MaCSBio) and Department of Biochemistry, Maastricht University, The Netherlands (A.I.).

Background: Electrical conduction from the cardiac sinoatrial node to the ventricles is critical for normal heart function. Genome-wide association studies have identified more than a dozen common genetic loci that are associated with PR interval. However, it is unclear whether rare and low-frequency variants also contribute to PR interval heritability.

Methods: We performed large-scale meta-analyses of the PR interval that included 83 367 participants of European ancestry and 9436 of African ancestry. We examined both common and rare variants associated with the PR interval.

Results: We identified 31 genetic loci that were significantly associated with PR interval after Bonferroni correction (<1.2×10), including 11 novel loci that have not been reported previously. Many of these loci are involved in heart morphogenesis. In gene-based analysis, we found that multiple rare variants at (=5.9×10) and (=1.1×10) were associated with PR interval. locus also was implicated in the common variant analysis, whereas was a novel locus.

Conclusions: We identified common variants at 11 novel loci and rare variants within 2 gene regions that were significantly associated with PR interval. Our findings provide novel insights to the current understanding of atrioventricular conduction, which is critical for cardiac activity and an important determinant of health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGEN.117.002037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5951629PMC
May 2018

Refining the accuracy of validated target identification through coding variant fine-mapping in type 2 diabetes.

Nat Genet 2018 04 9;50(4):559-571. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

We aggregated coding variant data for 81,412 type 2 diabetes cases and 370,832 controls of diverse ancestry, identifying 40 coding variant association signals (P < 2.2 × 10); of these, 16 map outside known risk-associated loci. We make two important observations. First, only five of these signals are driven by low-frequency variants: even for these, effect sizes are modest (odds ratio ≤1.29). Second, when we used large-scale genome-wide association data to fine-map the associated variants in their regional context, accounting for the global enrichment of complex trait associations in coding sequence, compelling evidence for coding variant causality was obtained for only 16 signals. At 13 others, the associated coding variants clearly represent 'false leads' with potential to generate erroneous mechanistic inference. Coding variant associations offer a direct route to biological insight for complex diseases and identification of validated therapeutic targets; however, appropriate mechanistic inference requires careful specification of their causal contribution to disease predisposition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0084-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5898373PMC
April 2018

A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 03 15;102(3):375-400. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic and diastolic BP incorporating gene-smoking interactions in 610,091 individuals. Stage 1 analysis examined ∼18.8 million SNPs and small insertion/deletion variants in 129,913 individuals from four ancestries (European, African, Asian, and Hispanic) with follow-up analysis of promising variants in 480,178 additional individuals from five ancestries. We identified 15 loci that were genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10) in stage 1 and formally replicated in stage 2. A combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analysis identified 66 additional genome-wide significant loci (13, 35, and 18 loci in European, African, and trans-ancestry, respectively). A total of 56 known BP loci were also identified by our results (p < 5 × 10). Of the newly identified loci, ten showed significant interaction with smoking status, but none of them were replicated in stage 2. Several loci were identified in African ancestry, highlighting the importance of genetic studies in diverse populations. The identified loci show strong evidence for regulatory features and support shared pathophysiology with cardiometabolic and addiction traits. They also highlight a role in BP regulation for biological candidates such as modulators of vascular structure and function (CDKN1B, BCAR1-CFDP1, PXDN, EEA1), ciliopathies (SDCCAG8, RPGRIP1L), telomere maintenance (TNKS, PINX1, AKTIP), and central dopaminergic signaling (MSRA, EBF2).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5985266PMC
March 2018

Electronic health record and genome-wide genetic data in Generation Scotland participants.

Wellcome Open Res 2017 18;2:85. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

MRC Human Genetics Unit, University of Edinburgh, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, EH4 2XU, UK.

This article provides the first detailed demonstration of the research value of the Electronic Health Record (EHR) linked to research data in Generation Scotland Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) participants, together with how to access this data. The structured, coded variables in the routine biochemistry, prescribing and morbidity records, in particular, represent highly valuable phenotypic data for a genomics research resource. Access to a wealth of other specialized datasets, including cancer, mental health and maternity inpatient information, is also possible through the same straightforward and transparent application process. The EHR linked dataset is a key component of GS:SFHS, a biobank conceived in 1999 for the purpose of studying the genetics of health areas of current and projected public health importance. Over 24,000 adults were recruited from 2006 to 2011, with broad and enduring written informed consent for biomedical research. Consent was obtained from 23,603 participants for GS:SFHS study data to be linked to their Scottish National Health Service (NHS) records, using their Community Health Index number. This identifying number is used for NHS Scotland procedures (registrations, attendances, samples, prescribing and investigations) and allows healthcare records for individuals to be linked across time and location. Here, we describe the NHS EHR dataset on the sub-cohort of 20,032 GS:SFHS participants with consent and mechanism for record linkage plus extensive genetic data. Together with existing study phenotypes, including family history and environmental exposures, such as smoking, the EHR is a rich resource of real world data that can be used in research to characterise the health trajectory of participants, available at low cost and a high degree of timeliness, matched to DNA, urine and serum samples and genome-wide genetic information.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12688/wellcomeopenres.12600.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5645708PMC
September 2017

Novel Blood Pressure Locus and Gene Discovery Using Genome-Wide Association Study and Expression Data Sets From Blood and the Kidney.

Hypertension 2017 Jul 24. Epub 2017 Jul 24.

From the Department of Health Sciences (L.V.W., A.M.E., N. Shrine, C.B., T.B., M.D.T.), and Department of Cardiovascular Sciences and NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (C.P.N., P.S.B., N.J.S.), University of Leicester, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology (A.V., P.J.v.d.M., I.M.N., H. Snieder), Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine (M.H.d.B., M.A.S.), Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (IPCE) (A.J.O., H.R., C.A.H.), Department of Genetics, (M.S.), and Department of Cardiology (P.v.d.H.), University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands; Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-Communicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran (A.V.); Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, The Netherlands (R. Jansen); Hebrew SeniorLife, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (R. Joehanes); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study, MA (R. Joehanes, A.D.J., M. Larson); Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (P.F.O.), and Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology (M.M., C. Menni, T.D.S.), King's College London, United Kingdom; Clinical Pharmacology, William Harvey Research Institute (C.P.C., H.R.W., M.R.B., M. Brown, B.M., M.R., P.B.M., M.J.C.) and NIHR Barts Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (C.P.C., H.R.W., M.R.B., M. Brown, P.B.M., M.J.C.), Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom; Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (L.M.R., F.G., P.M.R., D.I.C.); Department of Epidemiology (G.C.V., A. Hofman, A.G.U., O.H.F.), Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology (N.A., B.A.O., C.M.v.D.), and Department of Internal Medicine (A.G.U.), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, EMGO+ Institute, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands (J.-J.H., E.J.d.G., G.W., D.I.B.); Cardiovascular Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (R.J.S., M. Frånberg, A. Hamsten); Centre for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Universitetsjukhuset, Solna, Sweden (R.J.S., M. Frånberg, A. Hamsten); Estonian Genome Center (T.E., E.O., A. Metspalu), Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine (S.S., M. Laan), and Estonian Genome Center (M.P.), University of Tartu, Estonia; Divisions of Endocrinology/Children's Hospital, Boston, MA (T.E.); Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA (T.E., C.M.L., C.N.-C.); Center for Complex Disease Genomics, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (D.E.A., P.N., A. Chakravarti, G.B.E.); The Population Science Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (S.-J.H., D.L.), Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging (M.A.N.), Medical Genomics and Metabolic Genetics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute (F.C.), and Center for Information Technology (Y.D., P.J.M., Q.T.N.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (S.-J.H., D.L.); The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Department of Pediatrics (X.G., J.Y.), and The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine (J.I.R.), LABioMed at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland (Z.K., M. Bochud); Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland (Z.K.); Department of Cardiology (S. Trompet, J.W.J.) Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics (S. Trompet), Department of Clinical Epidemiology (R.L.-G., R.d.M., D.O.M.-K.), Department of Molecular Epidemiology (J.D.), and Department of Public Health and Primary Care (D.O.M.-K.), Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; Institute for Community Medicine (A.T.), Department of Internal Medicine B (M.D.), and Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics (U.V.), University Medicine Greifswald, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald, Germany (A.T., M.D., U.V.); Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany (J.S.R., A. Peters); Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine (J.C.B., B.M.P.) and Departments of Biostatistics (K.R.), Epidemiology (B.M.P.), and Health Services (B.M.P.), University of Washington, Seattle; Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland (A.V.S., V. Gudnason); Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland (A.V.S., V. Gudnason); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, Tampere, Finland (L.-P.L., T.L.); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland (L.-P.L., T.L.); Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics (A. Mahajan, A.G., M. Farrall, T.F., C.M.L., H.W., A.P.M.), and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine (A.G., M. Farrall, H.W.), University of Oxford, United Kingdom; MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, United Kingdom (N.J.W., J.L., C.L., R.J.F.L., R.A.S., J.H.Z.); Clinical Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurology (E.H., R. Schmidt), Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation (E.H.), and Department of Neurology (H. Schmidt), Medical University Graz, Austria; Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics (P.K.J., H.C., I.R., S.W., J.F.W.), Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (L.M.L., S.E.H., G.D., A.J.G., D.C.M.L., J.M.S., I.J.D.), Medical Genetics Section, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (A. Campbell), Generation Scotland, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine (A. Campbell, S.P., C.H.), Department of Psychology (G.D., D.C.M.L., A. Pattie, I.J.D.), Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre (J.M.S.), and Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (C.H.), University of Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Health (K.K., A.S.H., T. Niiranen, P.J., A.J., S. Koskinen, P.K., V.S., M.P.), and Chronic Disease Prevention Unit (J.T.), National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Division of Genetics and Cell Biology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy (M.T., C.M.B., C.F.S., D.T.); Data Tecnica International, Glen Echo, MD (M.A.N.); Medical Genetics, IRCCS-Burlo Garofolo Children Hospital, Trieste, Italy (D.V., G.G., P.G.); Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Italy (D.V., I.G., M. Brumat, M. Cocca, A. Morgan, G.G., P.G.); Institute for Biomedicine, Eurac Research, Affiliated Institute of the University of Lübeck, Bolzano, Italy (F.D.G.M., P.P.P., A.S.P., A.A.H.); Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences (K.L.A.), The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine (Y.L., E.P.B., R.J.F.L.), and Mindich Child health Development Institute (R.J.F.L.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York; Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics, IMIM, and CIBERCV, Barcelona, Spain (J. Marrugat, R.E.); Institute of Genetics and Biophysics A. Buzzati-Traverso, CNR, Napoli, Italy (D.R., T. Nutile, R. Sorice, M. Ciullo); Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin (L.M.L.); UCD Conway Institute, Centre for Proteome Research (L.M.L.), and School of Medicine, Conway Institute (D.C.S.), University College Dublin, Belfield, Ireland; Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala Universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, Sweden (S.E., Å. Johansson, U.G.); Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (A.U.J., M. Boehnke); NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester United Kingdom (C.P.N., P.S.B., N.J.S.); MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (J.E.H., V.V., J. Marten, A.F.W., J.F.W.), and Medical Genetics Section, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine and MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (S.E.H.), University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health (W.Z., E.E., J.C.C., H.G., B.L., I.T., A.-C.V.), MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health (M.-R.J., P.E.), School of Public Health (N.P.), International Centre for Circulatory Health (S. Thom), and National Heart and Lung Institute (P.S.), Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Department of Cardiology, Ealing Hospital, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Southall, United Kingdom (W.Z., J.C.C., J.S.K.); Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Croatia (T.Z.); Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina Medical School, Greece (E.E.); Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Scotland, United Kingdom (N. Shah, A.S.F.D., C.N.A.P.); Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad, Pakistan (N. Shah); National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, London, United Kingdom (M.M.); Department of Human Genetics, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, United Kingdom (B.P.P., E.Z.); INSERM U 1219, Bordeaux Population Health Center, France (G.C., C.T., S.D.); Bordeaux University, France (G.C., C.T., S.D.); Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW, Australia (C.O., E.G.H., R. Scott, J.A.); Center for Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (G.A.); Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran (M.A.); Busselton Population Medical Research Institute, Western Australia (J.B., J.H.); PathWest Laboratory Medicine of Western Australia, Nedlands (J.B., J.H.); School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (J.B., J.H.), School of Population and Global Health (J.H.), and School of Medicine and Pharmacology (A. James), The University of Western Australia, Nedlands; Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom (J.C.C., J.S.K.); University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, United Kingdom (J.C.); Institute of Genetic Medicine (H.J.C.), and Institute of Health and Society (C. Mamasoula), Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; Department of Pathology, Amsterdam Medical Center, The Netherlands (J.J.D.); Department of Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, Stockholm University, Sweden (M. Frånberg); Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics, Uppsala, Sweden (V. Giedraitis); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany (C.G.); Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom (A.J.G.); Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging (T.B.H., L.J.L.); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (A. Hofman); Center For Life-Course Health Research (M.-R.J.), and Biocenter Oulu (M.-R.J.), University of Oulu, Finland; Unit of Primary Care, Oulu University Hospital, Finland (M.-R.J.); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Human Genomics Branch, Bethesda, MD (A.D.J.); Department of Clinical Physiology, Tampere University Hospital, Finland (M.K.); Department of Clinical Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland (M.K.); Cardiovascular Research Center (S. Kathiresan, C.N.-C.); Center for Human Genetics (S. Kathiresan), and Center for Human Genetic Research (C.N.-C.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA (S. Kathiresan, C.N.-C.); Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (K.-T.K.); Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Croatia (I.K., O.P.); Cardiology, Department of Specialties of Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland (L. Lin, F.M., G.B.E.); Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology (L. Lind, J.S.), and Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (E.I.), Uppsala University, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Y.M., B.W.J.H.P.); School of Molecular, Genetic and Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Teviot Place, Scotland, United Kingdom (A.D.M.); Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (A.C.M.); British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences (S.P.), and Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine (D.J.S.), University of Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Finland (A. Palotie, S.R., A.-P.S., M.P.); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada (G.P., S. Thériault); Department of Neurology, General Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy (P.P.P.); Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, Germany (P.P.P.); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland (O.T.R.); Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Finland (O.T.R.); Department of Cardiology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China (M.R.); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (P.M.R., D.I.C.); Institute for Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy (A.R.); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Centre for Molecular Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Austria (Y.S., H. Schmidt); INSERM U1078, Etablissement Français du Sang, Brest Cedex, France (A.S.P.); Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia (R. Scott, J.A.); John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton, NSW, Australia (R. Scott, J.A.); The New York Academy of Medicine, New York (D.S.); IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy (R. Sorice, M. Ciullo); Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland (A.S.); Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (K.D.T.); Division of Genetic Outcomes, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (K.D.T.); Department of Public Health (C.T.), and Department of Neurology (S.D.), Bordeaux University Hospital, France; Department of Internal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, CHUV, Switzerland (P.V.); Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton Ontario, Canada (D.C.); National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, United Kingdom (J.S.K.); Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait (J.T.); Diabetes Research Group, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (J.T.); Department of Neurosciences and Preventive Medicine, Danube-University Krems, Austria (J.T.); Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, The University of Manchester and Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom (B.D.K.); Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem (Y.M.L.); Kaiser Permanent Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA (B.M.P.); Institute of Physiology, University Medicine Greifswald, Karlsburg, Germany (R.R); Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (A. James); Population Health Research Institute, St George's, University of London, United Kingdom (D.P.S.); Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (W.P.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA (E.I.); Data Science Institute and Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster University, United Kingdom (J.K.); and Department of Biostatistics, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom (A.P.M.).

Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has a substantial genetic contribution. Genetic variation influencing blood pressure has the potential to identify new pharmacological targets for the treatment of hypertension. To discover additional novel blood pressure loci, we used 1000 Genomes Project-based imputation in 150 134 European ancestry individuals and sought significant evidence for independent replication in a further 228 245 individuals. We report 6 new signals of association in or near , , , , , and , and provide new replication evidence for a further 2 signals in and Combining large whole-blood gene expression resources totaling 12 607 individuals, we investigated all novel and previously reported signals and identified 48 genes with evidence for involvement in blood pressure regulation that are significant in multiple resources. Three novel kidney-specific signals were also detected. These robustly implicated genes may provide new leads for therapeutic innovation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5783787PMC
July 2017

Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults.

PLoS Genet 2017 Apr 27;13(4):e1006528. Epub 2017 Apr 27.

Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5407576PMC
April 2017
-->