Publications by authors named "Jonathan Baillie"

221 Publications

Global human influence maps reveal clear opportunities in conserving Earth's remaining intact terrestrial ecosystems.

Glob Chang Biol 2020 08 5;26(8):4344-4356. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

National Geographic Society, Washington, DC, USA.

Leading up to the Convention on Biological Diversity Conference of the Parties 15, there is momentum around setting bold conservation targets. Yet, it remains unclear how much of Earth's land area remains without significant human influence and where this land is located. We compare four recent global maps of human influences across Earth's land, Anthromes, Global Human Modification, Human Footprint and Low Impact Areas, to answer these questions. Despite using various methodologies and data, these different spatial assessments independently estimate similar percentages of the Earth's terrestrial surface as having very low (20%-34%) and low (48%-56%) human influence. Three out of four spatial assessments agree on 46% of the non-permanent ice- or snow-covered land as having low human influence. However, much of the very low and low influence portions of the planet are comprised of cold (e.g., boreal forests, montane grasslands and tundra) or arid (e.g., deserts) landscapes. Only four biomes (boreal forests, deserts, temperate coniferous forests and tundra) have a majority of datasets agreeing that at least half of their area has very low human influence. More concerning, <1% of temperate grasslands, tropical coniferous forests and tropical dry forests have very low human influence across most datasets, and tropical grasslands, mangroves and montane grasslands also have <1% of land identified as very low influence across all datasets. These findings suggest that about half of Earth's terrestrial surface has relatively low human influence and offers opportunities for proactive conservation actions to retain the last intact ecosystems on the planet. However, though the relative abundance of ecosystem areas with low human influence varies widely by biome, conserving these last intact areas should be a high priority before they are completely lost.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7383735PMC
August 2020

Cardiac Electrophysiological Effects of Light-Activated Chloride Channels.

Front Physiol 2018 17;9:1806. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Institute for Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine, University Heart Centre Freiburg-Bad Krozingen Medical Center-University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

During the last decade, optogenetics has emerged as a paradigm-shifting technique to monitor and steer the behavior of specific cell types in excitable tissues, including the heart. Activation of cation-conducting channelrhodopsins (ChR) leads to membrane depolarization, allowing one to effectively trigger action potentials (AP) in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, the quest for optogenetic tools for hyperpolarization-induced inhibition of AP generation has remained challenging. The green-light activated ChR from (GtACR1) mediates Cl-driven photocurrents that have been shown to silence AP generation in different types of neurons. It has been suggested, therefore, to be a suitable tool for inhibition of cardiomyocyte activity. Using single-cell electrophysiological recordings and contraction tracking, as well as intracellular microelectrode recordings and optical recordings of whole hearts, we find that GtACR1 activation by prolonged illumination arrests cardiac cells in a depolarized state, thus inhibiting re-excitation. In line with this, GtACR1 activation by transient light pulses elicits AP in rabbit isolated cardiomyocytes and in spontaneously beating intact hearts of zebrafish. Our results show that GtACR1 inhibition of AP generation is caused by cell depolarization. While this does not address the need for optogenetic silencing through physiological means (i.e., hyperpolarization), GtACR1 is a potentially attractive tool for activating cardiomyocytes by transient light-induced depolarization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01806DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6304430PMC
December 2018

Space for nature.

Science 2018 Sep;361(6407):1051

Ya-Ping Zhang is a biologist at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aau1397DOI Listing
September 2018

An Ecoregion-Based Approach to Protecting Half the Terrestrial Realm.

Bioscience 2017 Jun 5;67(6):534-545. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

Eric Dinerstein David Olson, Carly Vynne Eric Wikramanayake, Nathan Hahn, Suzanne Palminteri, Lori Price, and Nadia de Souza are conservation biologists at RESOLVE's Biodiversity and Wildlife Solutions Program, in Washington, DC. Anup Joshi is a research associate and program coordinator at the Conservation Biology Program at the University of Minnesota, in St. Paul. Neil D. Burgess and Yara Shennan-Farpón are with the Science Programme at the United Nations Environment Program-World Conservation Monitoring Centre, in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Prashant Hedao is in the Geography Graduate Group at the University of California, Davis. Reed Noss is a professor of biological sciences at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando. Matthew Hansen is a remote sensing scientist at the University of Maryland, in College Park. Harvey Locke is cofounder of the Nature Needs Half Movement and cofounder and strategic advisor of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative, in Banff, Alberta. Erle C. Ellis is a professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Charles Victor Barber is the director of the Forest Legality Initiative, Crystal Davis is the director of Global Forest Watch, and Benjamin Jones is a senior fellow at World Resources Institute, Washington, DC. Randy Hayes is the executive director of Foundation Earth, in Washington, DC. Cyril Kormos and Vance Martin are vice president for policy and president, respectively, at the Wild Foundation, in Boulder, Colorado. Eileen Crist is an associate professor in the Department of Science and Technology in Society at Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, Virginia. Wes Sechrest is the chief scientist and CEO at Global Wildlife Conservation, in Austin, Texas. Jonathan E. M. Baillie is chief scientist and senior vice president at National Geographic Society, Washington, DC. Don Weeden is the executive director of the Weeden Foundation, in Bedford Hills, New York. Kierán Suckling is the executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity, in Tucson, Arizona. Nigel Sizer is president of the Rainforest Alliance, in New York. Rebecca Moore, David Thau, and Tanya Birch are with the Google Earth Outreach and Google Earth Engine programs, in Mountain View, California. Lilian Pintea is the vice president for science at the Jane Goodall Institute, in Vienna, Virginia. José C. Brito is a researcher with CIBIO-InBIO, in Vairão, Portugal. Othman A. Llewellyn is an environmental planner in the Department of Protected Area Planning at the Saudi Wildlife Authority, in Saudi Arabia. Anthony G. Miller is the director of the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, in Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Annette Patzelt is the scientific director at the Oman Botanic Garden, in the Sultanate of Oman. Shahina A. Ghazanfar is research leader in identification and naming-Asia and Jonathan Timberlake is a botanist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, in Kew, Surrey, United Kingdom. Heinz Klöser is at the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, in Bremerhaven, Bremen, Germany. Roeland Kindt is a scientist at the World Agroforestry Centre, in Nairobi, Kenya. Jens-Peter Barnekow Lillesø and Paulo van Breugel are at the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark. Lars Graudal is a senior advisor at the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, and science domain leader at ICRAF (the World Agroforestry Centre), in Nairobi. Maianna Voge is a geospatial analyst at Greeninfo Network. Khalaf F. Al-Shammari and Mohammed Saleem are information specialists with the Environmental Information Unit of the General Department of Studies and Research at the Saudi Wildlife Authority.

We assess progress toward the protection of 50% of the terrestrial biosphere to address the species-extinction crisis and conserve a global ecological heritage for future generations. Using a map of Earth's 846 terrestrial ecoregions, we show that 98 ecoregions (12%) exceed Half Protected; 313 ecoregions (37%) fall short of Half Protected but have sufficient unaltered habitat remaining to reach the target; and 207 ecoregions (24%) are in peril, where an average of only 4% of natural habitat remains. We propose a Global Deal for Nature-a companion to the Paris Climate Deal-to promote increased habitat protection and restoration, national- and ecoregion-scale conservation strategies, and the empowerment of indigenous peoples to protect their sovereign lands. The goal of such an accord would be to protect half the terrestrial realm by 2050 to halt the extinction crisis while sustaining human livelihoods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5451287PMC
June 2017

BIM and its benefits explained.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 09;70(8):19-22

A high-level look at Building Information Modelling's key benefits, the potential pitfalls, and the priorities for successful implementation, in the wake of the recent Government mandate that all centrally procured public sector construction projects commenced after 4 April this year be implementing BIM Level 2, was given by Chartered Quantity Surveyor, Gary Allen, of IDC-Consult, at the first in a series of planned IHEEM/HefmA joint seminars on the topic held recently at the headquarters of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) in London. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.
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September 2016

Senior personnel meet to debate key issues.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 08;70(7):33-6

Prior to the start of the second day of April's Hospital Innovations 2016 show at Olympia, London, and immediately before Lord Carter gave an address at the event updating conference delegates on progress with he and his team's review of the 'productivity and efficiency' of English NHS acute hospitals, IHEEM held an 'invitation only' Chief Executives' Breakfast Briefing, at which senior personnel from both the NHS and private sector discussed some of their key concerns against today's difficult economic backdrop for the sector. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.
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August 2016

Best practice not being sufficiently replicated.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 06;70(6):19-23

'Efficient productivity through innovation' was the theme of the first ever Hospital Innovations conference and exhibition at Olympia, London in late April. At the two-day event--supported by organisations including IHEEM, the Legionella Control Association, the Water Management Society, the BRE, and a sizeable number of English NHS Trusts--the Day Two keynote address by Lord Carter very much reflected this theme. Following his address at Healthcare Estates 2015, the Labour Peer focused further in London on his team's recent review of the 'productivity and efficiency' of English NHS Trusts, and explained how the initiative would progress in coming months. One of his key conclusions was that while the NHS consistently rates as one of the world's most efficient public health systems, innovation and good practice are rarely sufficiently shared or widely replicated service-wide, resulting in a considerable 'gap' between the best and worst-performing Trusts. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.
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June 2016

How 'Big data' will drive future innovation.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Mar;70(3):59-64

Giving the opening keynote speech at last year's Healthcare Estates conference, Mike Hobbs, managing director of Carillion Health, drew on his 25 years' experience to discuss how innovation can help drive the greater efficiency and productivity that the NHS is charged with delivering, in the process cutting costs at a time when the service faces the tightest economic pressures in its history. He argued that as we enter a new world of 'Big data', the availability of accurate, comprehensive data on which to base key decisions will be the major enabler for the design and construction of high quality healthcare facilities in the future. It will equally be key, he said, to their efficient, low-cost, and optimal utilisation to provide the higher 'productivity' the Government says is essential.
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March 2016

Assessment unit meets Trust ambitions.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Mar;70(3):33-6

The quality of the care environment within a new 16-bedded modular-built ward, the Gilwern Assessment Unit, at Hereford County Hopsital, has won widespread praise from the clinicians and nurses staffing it--many of whom were recruited specially to work in it. The impressive new single-storey assessment unit for frail, older patients--which admitted its first patients just before Christmas--is formed from 14 separate modules erected offsite, delivered individually on low-loaders, craned into position, and then finished and fitted out to an extremely high standard, by off-site building specialist, MTX. The new ward was completed on budget to an extremely tight schedule, met--thanks to excellent teamwork--despite the added complication of the unit being built over a former burial ground.
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March 2016

Improving efficiency, securing savings.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Mar;70(3):16-20

The NHS in England could save £1 bn annually if all NHS acute Trustsachieved the median level of estates and facilities running costs, the second (and 'final') report by Lord Carter and his team into the 'productivity and efficiency' of acute NHS Trusts across England, published on 5 February,suggests. As HEJ, editor, Jonathan Baillie reports, Lord Carter's team'songoing recent discussions with senior personnel working in a range of disciplines at 32 NHS Trusts--which followed dialogue with an initial 22 Trusts--identified 'unwarranted variation' in the use of resources ranging from staff to land and buildings on such a scale that effectively addressing this 'variation' could, the DH-commissioned team says, potentially reduce by £5 bn annually the NHS in England's costs.
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March 2016

Hot and cold water issues deftly described.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Feb;70(2):51-4

Speaking at a Legionella Control Association Open Day on 9 October last year in Tamworth, Mike Quest, an LCA director and Committee Member who is an independent water hygiene and safety consultant and an NHS Authorising Engineer, presented his standpoint on effective risk assessment and monitoring of complex hot and cold water systems. He also focused on some of the challenges for engineering and estates teams in maintaining water temperatures within 'safe limits' in modern buildings, with reference to the complications he had seen in a hospital project he has recently been working on.
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February 2016

CCGs' role in the future of the estate.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Jan;70(1):31-4

With the backdrop of a 21st century healthcare landscape where a number of previous commissioning and provider organisations now no longer exist, and other new bodies have taken their place, 'The role of the Clinical Commissioning Group in determining the future of the NHS estate' was the title of a presentation by Helen Davis, a partner in the Healthcare Advisory team at Arcadis, on the second day of this year's Healthcare Estates conference. While acknowledging the part that CCGs could have in managing and running the estate, Helen Davis felt they not only needed to be better 'geared up' with estates-related knowledge and expertise to be able to make a valuable contribution, but that effective collaboration between all providers, commissioners, and users of the healthcare estate was vital to ensure optimal use of facilities in the future. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.
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January 2016

Expert panel engages with lively audience.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Jan;70(1):24-8

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January 2016

Hospital 'productivity' the key to savings.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2016 Jan;70(1):18-22

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January 2016

Complete wing decanted in £3 m renovation.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Oct;69(9):45-50

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October 2015

Vigilance vital to ensure high standards.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Oct;69(9):19-24

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October 2015

Processing on site can cut costs.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Nov;69(10):60-3

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November 2015

London Trusts proud to describe their work.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Nov;69(10):27-32

'Waste not, Want not' was the title of a recent IHEEM seminar which examined some of the key issues for those responsible for dealing with healthcare waste--from regulatory compliance and correct segregation of waste streams, to the opportunities for more on-site processing. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports on the joint presentations given by key environmental and sustainability personnel at two of London's largest NHS Trusts, and their private sector waste management partners. These discussed some of the key initiatives that each Trust and its 'partner' have taken to not only significantly reduce the amount of waste generated on their estate, but also to dispose of it in an environmentally responsible way. These initiatives, the speakers explained, were all part of their organisations' journey on the road to achieving 'Deep Green', a 'nirvana'-like state where their activities have a zero net impact on the environment.
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November 2015

Europe's first children's hospital in a park.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Sep;69(8):33-8

Just a year after the centenary of the completion of the 1914-built children's hospital which it will soon replace, this autumn will see the opening of a new Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool, dubbed Alder Hey in the Park thanks to its attractive parkland setting. The 270-bedded hospital, designed by architects, landscape architects, and interior designers, BDP, and built by Laing O'Rourke, is located in Springfield Park on Liverpool's northern fringes, and features a highly striking external design, with the three distinctive 'fingers' housing the wards bordered by extensive greenery, and the buildings topped by green undulating roofs. All the inpatient bedrooms, and indeed many other internal spaces, will enjoy parkland views. The new hospital will also reportedly offer some of Europe's most advanced children's healthcare. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports on the construction of this stunning new healthcare facility, where children's views were key in shaping the design.
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September 2015

Looking to a capable future workforce.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Sep;69(8):18-20, 22-6

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September 2015

Healthcare facilities looking to 'future-proof'.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Aug;69(7):61-6

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August 2015

Event to reflect 'service user-led thinking'.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 May;69(5):66-8

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May 2015

Ambitious goals met, but more to achieve.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 May;69(5):31-6

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May 2015

Tough by name, tough by nature.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Apr;69(4):48-53

Few beds, one would imagine, could withstand three-quarters of a ton landing on them, but this was the challenge successfully met by a box bed from a furniture manufacturer for challenging behaviour environments, Tough Furniture, when, to reassure a customer that the bed could accommodate 30-stone patients, 13 of the company's staff jumped repeatedly on it to ensure that it would survive intact in a real-world setting. Such testing may seem extreme, but is vital, since much of the company's furniture is destined for environments where patients will abuse, and indeed attempt to destroy, components. As MD David Vesty explained to HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, when he visited the company's Shropshire headquarters, it is through manufacturing premium quality cabinet furniture that is both attractive and distinctly non-institutional, but will equally withstand the harshest use, that the company has ensured that its products can live up to the brand name.
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April 2015

Switchgear project meticulously managed.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Apr;69(4):25-30

Electrical engineering and estates personnel at Sodexo--which manages a wide range of soft and hard facilities management services for five hospitals under a PFI contract at the Manchester Royal Infirmary--have successfully planned, managed, and co-ordinated, a complex electrical engineering project which saw high voltage (HV) switchgear in the site's main intake sub-station dismantled by the supplier to repair a potential earthing mechanism fault which would have prevented individual switchgear panels being shut down, to, for example, cater for renovation of electrical cabling or components cross the site's high voltage network. With detailed planning, including provision for bringing onto site temporary bulk generators, and the formulation of a 600-step switching programme, the replacement of potential faulty driver components in the disconnect mechanism for 20 HV switchgear panels was completed in just four weeks, with minimal interruption to the vast complex's power supply.
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April 2015

Hospitals single-room design evaluated.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Jan;69(1):27-30

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January 2015

President's 'proud moment' shared.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Jan;69(1):15-8

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January 2015

Bringing a military approach to teaching.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Mar;69(3):33-8

Despite having only established the company nine years ago, the founders of Kidderminster-based Avensys Medical believe the company now offers not only one of the UK's most comprehensive maintenance, repair, consultancy, and equipment audit services for medical and dental equipment, but also one of the most tailored training portfolios for electro-biomedical (EBME) engineers working in healthcare settings to enable them to get the best out of such equipment, improve patient safety, optimise service life, and save both the NHS and private sector money. As HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, discovered on meeting one of the two co-founders, ex-Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME) artificer sergeant-major (ASM) and MoD engineering trainer, Robert Strange, many of the company's key trainers have a strong military background, and it is the rigorous and disciplined approach this enables them to bring to their training that he believes singles the company out.
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March 2015

Shouldering the load, maximising value.

Authors:
Jonathan Baillie

Health Estate 2015 Feb;69(2):27-8, 30-1

In mid-November last year Ryhurst signed what it dubbed 'a ground-breaking strategic estates partnership' agreement with the Isle of Wight NHS Trust (HEJ - January 2015). Under the Wight Life Partnership, the two organisations will work in partnership 'to comprehensively review the estate across all the Trust's sites to ensure that buildings and grounds are being fully utilised, and suitable for modern healthcare'. This is Ryhurst's third such 'whole estate' joint-venture agreement with the NHS, and the first with a non-Foundation Trust, harnessing an approach that sees the company shoulder a considerable part of the burden of making optimum use of, and deriving 'maximum value' from, large healthcare estates. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.
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February 2015
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