Publications by authors named "Jonas Ingermann"

5 Publications

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Anti-inflammatory chemoprevention attenuates the phenotype in a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Carcinogenesis 2021 Apr 20. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Medicine II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich (TUM), Ismaninger Str, München, Germany.

Barrett´s Esophagus (BE) is the main known precursor condition of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma (EAC). BE is defined by the presence of metaplasia above the normal squamous columnar junction and has mainly been attributed to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic reflux esophagitis. Thus, the rising incidence of EAC in the Western world is likely mediated by chronic esophageal inflammation, secondary to GERD in combination with environmental risk factors such as a Western diet and obesity. However, (at present) risk prediction tools and endoscopic surveillance have shown limited effectiveness. Chemoprevention as an adjunctive approach remains an attractive option to reduce the incidence of neoplastic disease. Here, we investigate the feasibility of chemopreventive approaches in BE and EAC via inhibition of inflammatory signaling in a transgenic mouse model of BE and EAC (L2-IL1B mice), with accelerated tumor formation on a high fat diet (HFD). L2-IL1B mice were treated with the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) aspirin or Sulindac. Interleukin-1b antagonism reduced tumor progression in L2-IL1B mice with or without a HFD, while both NSAIDs were effective chemoprevention agents in the accelerated HFD fed L2-IL1B mouse model. Sulindac treatment also resulted in a marked change in the immune profile of L2-IL-1B mice. In summary, anti-inflammatory treatment of HFD-treated L2-IL1B mice acted protectively on disease progression. These results from a mouse model of BE support results from clinical trials that suggest that anti-inflammatory medication may be effective in the chemoprevention of EAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgab032DOI Listing
April 2021

Elimination of NF-κB signaling in Vimentin+ stromal cells attenuates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of Barrett's Esophagus.

Carcinogenesis 2021 04;42(3):405-413

Department of Medicine II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich (TUM), München, Germany.

Chronic inflammation induces Barrett's Esophagus (BE) which can advance to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Elevated levels of interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-6 and IL-8 together with activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), have been identified as important mediators of tumorigenesis. The inflammatory milieu apart from cancer cells and infiltrating immune cells contains myofibroblasts (MFs) that express aSMA and Vimentin. As we observed that increased NF-κB activation and inflammation correlates with increased MF recruitment and an accelerated phenotype we here analyze the role of NF-κB in MF during esophageal carcinogenesis in our L2-IL-1B mouse model. To analyze the effect of NF-κB signaling in MFs, we crossed L2-IL-1B mice to tamoxifen inducible Vim-Cre (Vim-CreTm) mice and floxed RelA (p65fl/fl) mice to specifically eliminate NF-κB signaling in MF (IL-1b.Vim-CreTm.p65fl/fl). The interaction of epithelial cells and stromal cells was further analyzed in mouse BE organoids and patient-derived human organoids. Histological scoring of IL-1b.Vim-CreTm.p65fl/fl mice showed a significantly attenuated phenotype compared with L2-IL-1B mice, with mild inflammation, decreased metaplasia and no dysplasia. This correlated with decreased proliferation and increased differentiation in cardia tissue of IL-1b.Vim-CreTm.p65fl/fl compared with L2-IL-1B mice. Distinct changes of cytokines and chemokines within the local microenvironment in IL-1b.Vim-CreTm.p65fl/fl mice reflected the histopathological abrogated phenotype. Co-cultured NF-κB inhibitor treated MF with mouse BE organoids demonstrated NF-κB-dependent growth and migration. MFs are essential to form an inflammatory and procarcinogenic microenvironment and NF-κB signaling in stromal cells emerges as an important driver of esophageal carcinogenesis. Our data suggest anti-inflammatory approaches as preventive strategies during surveillance of BE patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgaa109DOI Listing
April 2021

Notch Signaling Mediates Differentiation in Barrett's Esophagus and Promotes Progression to Adenocarcinoma.

Gastroenterology 2020 08 20;159(2):575-590. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, New York.

Background & Aims: Studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Barrett's esophagus (BE) progresses to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Notch signaling maintains stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract and is dysregulated during carcinogenesis. We explored the relationship between Notch signaling and goblet cell maturation, a feature of BE, during EAC pathogenesis.

Methods: We measured goblet cell density and levels of Notch messenger RNAs in BE tissues from 164 patients, with and without dysplasia or EAC, enrolled in a multicenter study. We analyzed the effects of conditional expression of an activated form of NOTCH2 (pL2.Lgr5.N2IC), conditional deletion of NOTCH2 (pL2.Lgr5.N2fl/fl), or loss of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) (pL2.Lgr5.p65fl/fl), in Lgr5 (progenitor) cells in L2-IL1B mice (which overexpress interleukin 1 beta in esophagus and squamous forestomach and are used as a model of BE). We collected esophageal and stomach tissues and performed histology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, transcriptome, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses. Cardia and forestomach tissues from mice were cultured as organoids and incubated with inhibitors of Notch or NF-kB.

Results: Progression of BE to EAC was associated with a significant reduction in goblet cell density comparing nondysplastic regions of tissues from patients; there was an inverse correlation between goblet cell density and levels of NOTCH3 and JAG2 messenger RNA. In mice, expression of the activated intracellular form of NOTCH2 in Lgr5 cells reduced goblet-like cell maturation, increased crypt fission, and accelerated the development of tumors in the squamocolumnar junction. Mice with deletion of NOTCH2 from Lgr5 cells had increased maturation of goblet-like cells, reduced crypt fission, and developed fewer tumors. Esophageal tissues from in pL2.Lgr5.N2IC mice had increased levels of RelA (which encodes the p65 unit of NF-κB) compared to tissues from L2-IL1B mice, and we found evidence of increased NF-κB activity in Lgr5 cells. Esophageal tissues from pL2.Lgr5.p65fl/fl mice had lower inflammation and metaplasia scores than pL2.Lgr5.N2IC mice. In organoids derived from pL2-IL1B mice, the NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 reduced cell survival and proliferation.

Conclusions: Notch signaling contributes to activation of NF-κB and regulates differentiation of gastric cardia progenitor cells in a mouse model of BE. In human esophageal tissues, progression of BE to EAC was associated with reduced goblet cell density and increased levels of Notch expression. Strategies to block this pathway might be developed to prevent EAC in patients with BE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2020.04.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7484392PMC
August 2020

High-Fat Diet Accelerates Carcinogenesis in a Mouse Model of Barrett's Esophagus via Interleukin 8 and Alterations to the Gut Microbiome.

Gastroenterology 2019 08 15;157(2):492-506.e2. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Irvine Cancer Research Center, Columbia University, New York, New York.

Background & Aims: Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Progression from BE to cancer is associated with obesity, possibly due to increased abdominal pressure and gastroesophageal reflux disease, although this pathogenic mechanism has not been proven. We investigated whether environmental or dietary factors associated with obesity contribute to the progression of BE to EAC in mice.

Methods: Tg(ED-L2-IL1RN/IL1B)#Tcw mice (a model of BE, called L2-IL1B mice) were fed a chow (control) or high-fat diet (HFD) or were crossbred with mice that express human interleukin (IL) 8 (L2-IL1B/IL8 mice). Esophageal tissues were collected and analyzed for gene expression profiles and by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry. Organoids were established from BE tissue of mice and cultured with serum from lean or obese individuals or with neutrophils from L2-IL1B mice. Feces from mice were analyzed by 16s ribosomal RNA sequencing and compared to 16s sequencing data from patients with dysplasia or BE. L2-IL1B were mice raised in germ-free conditions.

Results: L2-IL1B mice fed an HFD developed esophageal dysplasia and tumors more rapidly than mice fed the control diet; the speed of tumor development was independent of body weight. The acceleration of dysplasia by the HFD in the L2-IL1B mice was associated with a shift in the gut microbiota and an increased ratio of neutrophils to natural killer cells in esophageal tissues compared with mice fed a control diet. We observed similar differences in the microbiomes from patients with BE that progressed to EAC vs patients with BE that did not develop into cancer. Tissues from dysplasias of L2-IL1B mice fed the HFD contained increased levels of cytokines that are produced in response to CXCL1 (the functional mouse homolog of IL8, also called KC). Serum from obese patients caused organoids from L2-IL1B/IL8 mice to produce IL8. BE tissues from L2-IL1B mice fed the HFD and from L2-IL1B/IL8 mice contained increased numbers of myeloid cells and cells expressing Cxcr2 and Lgr5 messenger RNAs (epithelial progenitors) compared with mice fed control diets. BE tissues from L2-IL1B mice raised in germ-free housing had fewer progenitor cells and developed less dysplasia than in L2-IL1 mice raised under standard conditions; exposure of fecal microbiota from L2-IL1B mice fed the HFD to L2-IL1B mice fed the control diet accelerated tumor development.

Conclusions: In a mouse model of BE, we found that an HFD promoted dysplasia by altering the esophageal microenvironment and gut microbiome, thereby inducing inflammation and stem cell expansion, independent of obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2019.04.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6662596PMC
August 2019

Is a Potential Target for Diagnostic PET/CT Imaging in Barrett's Dysplasia and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

Clin Cancer Res 2018 03 5;24(5):1048-1061. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

II. Medizinische Klinik, Technische Universitat München, Munich, Germany.

Barrett's esophagus represents an early stage in carcinogenesis leading to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Considerable evidence supports a major role for chronic inflammation and diverse chemokine pathways in the development of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Here we utilized an transgenic mouse model of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma and human patient imaging to analyze the importance of CXCR4-expressing cells during esophageal carcinogenesis. IL1β overexpression induces chronic esophageal inflammation and recapitulates the progression to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. CXCR4 expression is increased in both epithelial and immune cells during disease progression in pL2-IL1β mice and also elevated in esophageal adenocarcinoma patient biopsy samples. Specific recruitment of CXCR4-positive (CXCR4) immune cells correlated with dysplasia progression, suggesting that this immune population may be a key contributor to esophageal carcinogenesis. Similarly, with progression to dysplasia, there were increased numbers of CXCR4 columnar epithelial cells at the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). These findings were supported by stronger CXCR4-related signal intensity in fluorescence imaging and autoradiography with advanced dysplasia. Pilot CXCR4-directed PET/CT imaging studies in patients with esophageal cancer demonstrate the potential utility of CXCR4 imaging for the diagnosis and staging of esophageal cancer. In conclusion, the recruitment of CXCR4 immune cells and expansion of CXCR4 epithelial cells in esophageal dysplasia and cancer highlight the potential of CXCR4 as a biomarker and molecular target for diagnostic imaging of the tumor microenvironment in esophageal adenocarcinoma. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-17-1756DOI Listing
March 2018