Publications by authors named "Jon D Samuels"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Protecting the tracheal tube cuff: a novel solution.

J Dent Anesth Pain Med 2021 Apr 31;21(2):167-171. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Anesthesiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital - Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

We describe the successful insertion of a nasotracheal tube following repeated cuff rupture. The patient was a 55-year-old woman with a history of nasal trauma and multiple rhinoplasties, who underwent elective Lefort I osteotomy and bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for correction of skeletal facial deformity. During fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation after the induction of general anesthesia, the tracheal tube repeatedly ruptured in both nares, despite extensive preparation of the nasal airways. We covered the cuff with a one-inch tape, intubated to the level of the oropharynx, pulled the tracheal tube out through the mouth, and removed the tape. The tracheal tube was then backed out to the level of the uvula, and was successfully advanced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17245/jdapm.2021.21.2.167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8039165PMC
April 2021

Adoption of video laryngoscopy by a major academic anesthesia department.

J Comp Eff Res 2021 02 20;10(2):101-108. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street, Box 124, New York, NY 10065, USA.

To describe the adoption patterns of intubating devices used at a major teaching and research facility. Retrospective analysis of 2012-2019 data on frequency and trends in airway management devices collected from our anesthesia information management system. Use of direct laryngoscopy was more frequent, but there was a downward trend in use over time (p < 0.008) in favor of video laryngoscopy (VL), which increased significantly (p < 0.008). The largest growth among devices was the McGrath VL, which increased from 0.2% in 2012 to 36.2% of cases in 2019. Our study shows a clear increase in VL usage which has implications in quality of care and medical education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/cer-2020-0185DOI Listing
February 2021

Social determinants of health affect unplanned readmissions following acute myocardial infarction.

J Comp Eff Res 2021 01 13;10(1):39-54. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Department of Anesthesiology, New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, Box 124, NY 10065, USA.

Low socioeconomic status predicts inferior clinical outcomes in many patient populations. The effects of patient insurance status and hospital safety-net status on readmission rates following acute myocardial infarction are unclear. A retrospective review of State Inpatient Databases for New York, California, Florida and Maryland, 2007-2014.  A total of 1,055,162 patients were included. Medicaid status was associated with 37.7 and 44.0% increases in risk-adjusted readmission odds at 30 and 90 days (p < 0.0001). Uninsured status was associated with reduced odds of readmission at both time points. High-burden safety-net status was associated with 9.6 and 9.5% increased odds of readmission at 30 and 90 days (p < 0.0003). Insurance status and hospital safety-net burden affect readmission odds following acute myocardial infarction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/cer-2020-0135DOI Listing
January 2021

Clearing Up the Obesity Paradox in Cardiac Surgery.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2021 03 23;35(3):959-960. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jvca.2020.06.057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7309770PMC
March 2021

Desperate times: Repurposing anesthesia machines for mechanical ventilation in COVID-19.

J Clin Anesth 2020 11 23;66:109967. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, 525 East 68th Street, Box 124, New York, NY 10065, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2020.109967DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7309906PMC
November 2020

Obesity Phenotype is a Predictor of COVID-19 Disease Susceptibility.

Authors:
Jon D Samuels

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2020 08 26;28(8):1368. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell College of Medicine, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.22866DOI Listing
August 2020

High stakes anesthesia: Anesthetic considerations and implications for complete dental extraction in a patient with complex comorbidities.

J Dent Anesth Pain Med 2019 Jun 30;19(3):167-173. Epub 2019 Jun 30.

Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, United States.

This case report describes a frail, middle-aged woman with multiple comorbidities who was scheduled to undergo extraction of all remaining teeth in anticipation of cardiac quadruple valve intervention. Dental and anesthetic management of the patient are discussed. Medical care of the patient with a high burden of comorbidities requires a multidisciplinary approach even for a routine dental procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17245/jdapm.2019.19.3.167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6620538PMC
June 2019

Nasal positive pressure with the SuperNOVA™ device decreases sedation-related hypoxemia during pre-bariatric surgery EGD.

Surg Endosc 2019 11 25;33(11):3828-3832. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street Box 294, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Introduction: Pre-operative esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is becoming routine practice in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Many patients with morbid obesity have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which can worsen hypoxia during an EGD. In this study, we report our outcomes using the SuperNOVA™ device, a sealed nasal positive airway pressure mask designed to deliver high-fraction inhaled oxygen and titratable positive pressure compared to conventional nasal cannula.

Methods: Between June 2016 and August 2017, we conducted a prospective observational study that included 56 consecutive patients who presented for EGD prior to bariatric surgery. Airway management was done using either the SuperNOVA™ (N = 26) device or conventional nasal cannula (N = 30). Patient demographics, procedure details, and outcomes were compared between the two groups.

Results: The SuperNOVA™ group had a lower median age compared to the control group (38.5 vs. 48.5 years, p = 0.04). These patients had a higher body mass index (BMI) (47.4 vs. 40.5, IQR, p < 0.0001), higher ASA class (p = 0.03), and were more likely to have OSA (53.9% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.04). Desaturation events were significantly lower in the SuperNOVA™ group (11.5% vs. 46.7%, p = 0.004) and the median lowest oxygen saturation was higher in the SuperNOVA™ group (100% vs. 90.5%, p < 0.0001).

Discussion: This is the first study to report on the use of the SuperNOVA™ device in bariatric patients undergoing pre-operative screening EGD. The use of the SuperNOVA™ device offers a clinical advantage compared to the current standard of care. Our data demonstrate that patients with higher BMI, higher ASA classification, and OSA were more likely to have the SuperNOVA™ device used; yet, paradoxically, these patients were less likely to have issues with desaturation events. Use of this device can optimize care in this challenging patient population by minimizing the risks of hypoventilation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-019-06721-1DOI Listing
November 2019

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Hospital Length of Stay in Obese Individuals Undergoing Sleeve Gastrectomy.

Obes Surg 2018 10;28(10):2998-3006

Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, Room A-1050, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Background: Retrospective studies indicate that acetaminophen iv administration reduces hospital length of stay (LoS) and opiate consumption in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

Objective: This study sought to determine whether using acetaminophen iv in morbidly obese subjects undergoing sleeve gastrectomy decreased LoS and total hospital charges as compared to patients receiving saline placebo.

Setting: Single-center university hospital METHODS: Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, subjects were assigned to receive either acetaminophen iv (group A) or saline placebo iv (group P). Data were collected between Jan 1 and Dec 31, 2016. Group A received acetaminophen every 6 h for a total of four doses. The first dose was administered following the induction of general anesthesia; group P received saline iv on the same schedule. Anesthetic management and prophylactic antiemetic regimen were standardized in all subjects. Postoperative pain management consisted of hydromorphone via patient-controlled infusion pump. Primary outcomes include hospital LoS and associated hospital costs. Secondary outcomes include patient satisfaction and postoperative nausea and pain scores.

Results: Subject demographics (n = 127) and intraoperative management were similar in the two groups. Across all subjects, median hospital LoS in group A (n = 63) was 1.87 vs. 1.97 days in group P (n = 64) (p = 0.03, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Postoperatively, daily quality-of-recovery (QoR-15) scores, narcotic consumption, and the use of rescue antiemetics were not significantly different between groups. Median hospital costs were as follows: group A, $12,885 vs. group P, $12,977 (n = 64).

Conclusions: Acetaminophen iv may reduce hospital LoS in subjects undergoing sleeve gastrectomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-018-3316-7DOI Listing
October 2018

Perioperative nausea and vomiting: much ado about nothing?

Authors:
Jon D Samuels

Aesthetic Plast Surg 2013 Jun 22;37(3):634-5. Epub 2013 Feb 22.

Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, 525 East 68th Street, Room M-308, Box 124, New York, NY 10065, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00266-013-0068-6DOI Listing
June 2013

Identifying specific surgical tools and methods for laparoscopic colorectal operations in obese patients.

J Gastrointest Surg 2012 Dec 14;16(12):2304-11. Epub 2012 Jul 14.

Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Objective: Laparoscopic operations for obese patients remain challenging due to technical difficulties at operation as well as higher comorbidities and high risk of postoperative complications. The aim of this study is to identify specific surgical tools and methods for laparoscopic colorectal operations for obese patients, applying knowledge of previous literature as well as our expertise in both laparoscopic and bariatric operations.

Conclusions: Current knowledge of bariatric surgery is invaluable in establishing a "customized" approach for laparoscopic colorectal operations in obese patients. The instruments routinely used during surgery on patients with normal body mass index (BMI) should often be modified and substituted according to the patient's BMI. We believe such an approach will prove beneficial to surgeons performing laparoscopic operations on obese patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-012-1937-zDOI Listing
December 2012