Publications by authors named "John R Stille"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Aurora kinase A inhibitor, LY3295668 erbumine: a phase 1 monotherapy safety study in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors.

Invest New Drugs 2021 Jan 22. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

McGill Centre for Translational Research in Cancer, Segal Cancer Centre - Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

Background Aurora A kinase (AurA) overexpression likely contributes to tumorigenesis and therefore represents an attractive target for cancer therapeutics. This phase 1 study aimed to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of LY3295668 erbumine, an AurA inhibitor, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors. Methods Patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, and disease progression after one to four prior treatment regimens were enrolled. Primary objective was to determine maximum tolerated dose (MTD); secondary objectives included evaluation of the tolerability and safety profile and pharmacokinetics of LY3295668. All patients received twice-daily (BID) oral LY3295668 in 21-day cycles in an ascending-dose schedule. Results Twelve patients were enrolled in phase 1 (25 mg, n = 8; 50 mg, n = 2; 75 mg, n = 2) and one patient was enrolled after. Overall, four patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) within the first cycle (75 mg: Grade 3 diarrhea [one patient], Grade 4 mucositis and Grade 3 corneal deposits [one patient]; 50 mg: mucositis and diarrhea [both Grade 3, one patient]; 25 mg: Grade 3 mucositis [one patient]). Patients exhibiting DLTs had the highest model-predicted exposures at steady state. Mucositis was the most common adverse event (67%), followed by diarrhea, fatigue, alopecia, anorexia, constipation, and nausea. Nine patients had best response of stable disease; the disease control rate was 69%. Conclusions MTD of LY3295668 was 25 mg BID. LY3295668 had a manageable toxicity profile and demonstrated activity in some patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors.Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03092934. Registered March 22, 2017. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03092934 .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10637-020-01049-3DOI Listing
January 2021

The Genomic Landscape of Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors in Patients with Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer.

Cancer Discov 2020 Aug 13;10(8):1174-1193. Epub 2020 May 13.

Center for Cancer Precision Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Mechanisms driving resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (CDK4/6i) in hormone receptor-positive (HR) breast cancer have not been clearly defined. Whole-exome sequencing of 59 tumors with CDK4/6i exposure revealed multiple candidate resistance mechanisms including loss, activating alterations in , and , and loss of estrogen receptor expression. experiments confirmed that these alterations conferred CDK4/6i resistance. Cancer cells cultured to resistance with CDK4/6i also acquired , or alterations, which conferred sensitivity to AURKA, ERK, or CHEK1 inhibition. Three of these activating alterations-in , and -have not, to our knowledge, been previously demonstrated as mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6i in breast cancer preclinically or in patient samples. Together, these eight mechanisms were present in 66% of resistant tumors profiled and may define therapeutic opportunities in patients. SIGNIFICANCE: We identified eight distinct mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6i present in 66% of resistant tumors profiled. Most of these have a therapeutic strategy to overcome or prevent resistance in these tumors. Taken together, these findings have critical implications related to the potential utility of precision-based approaches to overcome resistance in many patients with HR metastatic breast cancer..
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/2159-8290.CD-19-1390DOI Listing
August 2020

A randomized clinical efficacy study targeting mPGES1 or EP4 in dogs with spontaneous osteoarthritis.

Sci Transl Med 2019 10;11(516)

Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN 46285, USA.

Canine studies of spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA) pain add valuable data supporting drug treatment mechanisms that may translate to humans. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study was conducted in client-owned dogs with moderate OA pain to evaluate efficacy of LYA, an inhibitor of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES1), an EP4 antagonist (LYB), and carprofen, versus placebo. Of 255 dogs screened, 163 were randomized (placebo/LYA/LYB/carprofen: = 43/39/42/39) and 158 completed treatment. Efficacy versus placebo was assessed using Bayesian mixed-effect model for repeated measure analyses of the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) pain interference score (PIS; primary endpoint), pain severity score, and overall impression, as well as the Liverpool Osteoarthritis in Dogs (LOAD) mobility score. The posterior probability that the difference to placebo was <0 at week 2 was 80% for LYA and 54% for LYB for CBPI PIS (both <95% predefined threshold). For secondary endpoints, the posterior probability that the difference to placebo was <0 at week 2 ranged from 89 to 96% for LYA and from 56 to 89% for LYB. The posterior probabilities comparing carprofen to placebo groups were ≥90% for all efficacy endpoints. The proportion of dogs with one or more adverse event was not significantly different from placebo (32.6%) for LYA (35.9%) or carprofen (25.6%), but the rate for LYB (59.5%) was higher versus placebo ( = 0.017). LYA treatment demonstrated consistent improvement in all efficacy measures, suggesting that inhibition of mPGES1 may be an effective treatment for chronic pain associated with OA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aaw9993DOI Listing
October 2019

Distinct mobilization of leukocytes and hematopoietic stem cells by CXCR4 peptide antagonist LY2510924 and monoclonal antibody LY2624587.

Oncotarget 2017 Nov 10;8(55):94619-94634. Epub 2017 Oct 10.

The Chorus Group, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana 46285, USA.

Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4 play a critical role in mobilization and redistribution of immune cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We evaluated effects of two CXCR4-targeting agents, peptide antagonist LY2510924 and monoclonal antibody LY2624587, on mobilizing HSCs and white blood cells (WBCs) in humans, monkeys, and mice. Biochemical analysis showed LY2510924 peptide blocked SDF-1/CXCR4 binding in all three species; LY2624587 antibody blocked binding in human and monkey, with minimal activity in mouse. Cellular analysis showed LY2624587 antibody, but not LY2510924 peptide, down-regulated cell surface CXCR4 and induced hematological tumor cell death; both agents have been shown to inhibit SDF-1/CXCR4 interaction and downstream signaling. In animal models, LY2510924 peptide induced robust, prolonged, dose- and time-dependent WBC and HSC increases in mice and monkeys, whereas LY2624587 antibody induced only moderate, transient increases in monkeys. In clinical trials, similar pharmacodynamic effects were observed in patients with advanced cancer: LY2510924 peptide induced sustained WBC and HSC increases, while LY2624587 antibody induced only minimal, transient WBC changes. These distinct pharmacodynamic effects in two different classes of CXCR4 inhibitors are clinically important and should be carefully considered when designing combination studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors or other agents for cancer therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.21816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5706900PMC
November 2017

Prognostic and predictive value of circulating tumor cells and CXCR4 expression as biomarkers for a CXCR4 peptide antagonist in combination with carboplatin-etoposide in small cell lung cancer: exploratory analysis of a phase II study.

Invest New Drugs 2017 06 15;35(3):334-344. Epub 2017 Mar 15.

Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN, USA.

Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression in CTCs and tumor tissue were evaluated as prognostic or predictive markers of CXCR4 peptide antagonist LY2510924 plus carboplatin-etoposide (CE) versus CE in extensive-stage disease small cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC). Methods This exploratory analysis of a phase II study evaluated CXCR4 expression in baseline tumor tissue and peripheral blood CTCs and in post-treatment CTCs. Optimum cutoff values were determined for CTC counts and CXCR4 expression in tumors and CTCs as predictors of survival outcome. Kaplan-Meier estimates and hazard ratios were used to determine biomarker prognostic and predictive values. Results There was weak positive correlation at baseline between CXCR4 expression in tumor tissue and CTCs. Optimum cutoff values were H-score ≥ 210 for CXCR4 tumor, ≥7% CTCs with CXCR4 expression (CXCR4 CTCs), and ≥6 CTCs/7.5 mL blood. Baseline H-score for CXCR4 tumor was not prognostic of progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS). Baseline CXCR4 CTCs ≥7% was prognostic of shorter PFS. CTCs ≥6 at baseline and cycle 2, day 1 were prognostic of shorter PFS and OS. None of the biomarkers at their respective optimum cutoffs was predictive of treatment response of LY2510924 plus CE versus CE. Conclusions In patients with ED-SCLC, baseline CXCR4 expression in tumor tissue was not prognostic of survival or predictive of LY2510924 treatment response. Baseline CXCR4 CTCs ≥7% was prognostic of shorter PFS. CTC count ≥6 at baseline and after 1 cycle of treatment were prognostic of shorter PFS and OS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10637-017-0446-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5418321PMC
June 2017

A randomized phase II study of LY2510924 and carboplatin/etoposide versus carboplatin/etoposide in extensive-disease small cell lung cancer.

Lung Cancer 2017 03 31;105:7-13. Epub 2016 Dec 31.

Lung Cancer Research Program, Sarah Cannon Research Institute, LLC, Nashville, TN, United States.

Objectives: This multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of LY2510924 (LY) added to first-line standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy for extensive-disease small cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) and explored the predictive value of C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) tumor response.

Materials And Methods: Patients with treatment-naïve ED-SCLC were randomized (1:1) to receive up to six 21-day cycles of carboplatin/etoposide alone (SOC) or in combination with 20mg LY2510924 administered subcutaneously on days 1-7 of each cycle (LY+SOC). The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR), and safety. Response relative to CXCR4 expression on baseline tumor was an exploratory endpoint.

Results: Of 94 patients randomized, 90 received treatment (LY+SOC, n=47; SOC, n=43). Median PFS (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 5.88 (4.83, 6.24) months for LY+SOC versus 5.85 (4.63, 5.51) months for SOC (hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.01 [0.62, 1.63]; p=0.9806). Median OS (95% CI) was 9.72 (6.64, 11.70) months for LY+SOC versus 11.14 (8.25, 13.44) months for SOC. ORR was 74.5% for LY+SOC versus 81% for SOC. Safety results between arms were similar, although the following adverse events were more frequent on the LY+SOC arm: anemia (61.7% vs 46.5%), neutropenia (61.7% vs 53.5%), leukopenia (27.7% vs 9.3%), vomiting (27.7% vs 16.3%), and pneumonia (10.6% vs 2.3%). In patients whose baseline CXCR4 expression was above the optimal cutoff (H-score 210), the hazard ratio (95% CI) was 1.27 (0.51, 3.15).

Conclusion: LY2510924 did not improve efficacy but had an acceptable toxicity profile when added to SOC for ED-SCLC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.12.020DOI Listing
March 2017

A Randomized, Open-Label Phase 2 Study of the CXCR4 Inhibitor LY2510924 in Combination with Sunitinib Versus Sunitinib Alone in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC).

Target Oncol 2016 10;11(5):643-653

Tennessee Oncology, Chattanooga, TN, USA.

Purpose: The chemokine (C-X-C Motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), are frequently overexpressed in a variety of solid tumors, and are believed to play important roles in the regulation of organ-specific metastasis, tumor growth, invasion, and survival. In this randomized Phase 2 trial, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of LY2510924 (LY), a peptide antagonist of CXCR4, combined with sunitinib (SUN) in the first-line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Patients And Methods: Eligible patients were randomized (2:1) to receive LY (20 mg SC daily) + SUN (50 mg PO daily for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks off) or SUN alone. Response was assessed after two cycles; patients continued treatment until tumor progression or intolerable toxicity. The study was powered to detect a 47 % increase in median progression-free survival (PFS).

Results: One hundred eight patients were randomized and treated (LY + SUN, 72; SUN, 36); median duration of treatment of five cycles. Observed median PFS was 8.1 months with LY + SUN and 12.3 months with SUN; Bayesian time-to-event HR 1.23; 95 % credible interval: 0.74, 1.96. LY was well tolerated; the toxicity profile was typical of SUN. No efficacy differences were seen between treatments groups when subsets with high versus low levels of CXCR4 tumor expression were compared.

Conclusions: The addition of LY to SUN in the first-line treatment of metastatic RCC was well tolerated, but did not improve the PFS or overall survival (OS) vs. SUN alone. CXCR4 remains an unproven therapeutic target for the treatment of RCC.

Clinical Trial:

Gov Identifier: NCT01391130.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11523-016-0434-9DOI Listing
October 2016

Discovery of 6-(4-{[5-Cyclopropyl-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)isoxazol-4-yl]methoxy}piperidin-1-yl)-1-methyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylic Acid: A Novel FXR Agonist for the Treatment of Dyslipidemia.

J Med Chem 2015 Dec 2;58(24):9768-72. Epub 2015 Dec 2.

Chorus, Eli Lilly and Company , Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana 46285, United States.

The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the "metabolic" subfamily of nuclear receptors. Several FXR agonists have been reported in the literature to have profound effects on plasma lipids in animal models. To discover novel and effective therapies for dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis, we have developed a series of potent FXR agonists that robustly lower plasma LDL and vLDL in LDLr-/- mice. To this end the novel piperidinylisoxazole system LY2562175 was discovered. This molecule is a potent and selective FXR agonist in vitro and has robust lipid modulating properties, lowering LDL and triglycerides while raising HDL in preclinical species. The preclinical ADME properties of LY2562175 were consistent with enabling once daily dosing in humans, and it was ultimately advanced to the clinic for evaluation in humans. The synthesis and biological profile of this molecule is discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.5b01161DOI Listing
December 2015

A decade of innovation in pharmaceutical R&D: the Chorus model.

Nat Rev Drug Discov 2015 Jan 15;14(1):17-28. Epub 2014 Dec 15.

The Chorus Group, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana 46285 USA.

Chorus is a small, operationally independent clinical development organization within Eli Lilly and Company that specializes in drug development from candidate selection to clinical proof of concept. The mission of Chorus is to achieve proof of concept rapidly and at a low cost while positioning successful projects for 'pharma-quality' late-stage development. Chorus uses a small internal staff of experienced drug developers and a network of external vendors to design and implement chemistry, manufacturing and control processes, preclinical toxicology and biology, and Phase I/II clinical trials. In the decade since it was established, Chorus has demonstrated substantial productivity improvements in both time and cost compared to traditional pharmaceutical research and development. Here, we describe its development philosophy, organizational structure, operational model and results to date.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrd4497DOI Listing
January 2015

A phase I trial of LY2510924, a CXCR4 peptide antagonist, in patients with advanced cancer.

Clin Cancer Res 2014 Jul 11;20(13):3581-8. Epub 2014 Apr 11.

Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana; and.

Purpose: Overexpression of C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) is implicated in tumor progression. LY2510924 is a peptide antagonist, which blocks stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) from CXCR4 binding.

Experimental Design: This phase I study included two parts: a 3+3 dose escalation (part A) and dose confirmation (part B). LY2510924 was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection on a 28-day cycle. The primary objective was to determine the recommended phase II dose. Secondary objectives included safety, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and pharmacodynamic response, including mobilization of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood.

Results: Forty-five patients were enrolled, 25 in part A and 20 in part B. Patients were administered increasing doses of LY2510924: 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, 20, and 30 mg/day for part A and 2.5 or 20 mg/day for part B. Two patients (30-mg/day cohort) experienced dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 increased neutrophil count. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was 20 mg/day. The most common drug-related treatment-emergent adverse events were fatigue (9%), injection-site reaction (9%), injection site pruritus (7%), and nausea (7%). The best response was stable disease for nine patients (20%). At the end of cycle 1, mean peak LY2510924 plasma concentration and the 24-hour area under the plasma concentration versus time curve increased slightly more than dose proportionally. LY2510924 dose dependently increased CD34(+) cell counts in peripheral blood up to 18-fold.

Conclusions: LY2510924 demonstrated CD34(+) cell mobilization at doses ≥2.5 mg/day with a tolerable safety profile up to an MTD of 20 mg/day.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-2686DOI Listing
July 2014