Publications by authors named "John Lotus"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Early multidrug treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) and reduced mortality among nursing home (or outpatient/ambulatory) residents.

Med Hypotheses 2021 Jun 5;153:110622. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

Concerned Ontario Doctors, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address:

The outbreak of COVID-19 from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread all over the world with tremendous morbidity and mortality in the elderly. In-hospital treatment addresses the multifaceted nature of the illness including initial viral replication, cytokine storm, and endothelial injury with thrombosis. We identified nine reports of early treatment outcomes in COVID-19 nursing home patients. Multi-drug therapy including hydroxychloroquine with one or more anti-infectives, corticosteroids, and antithrombotic anti-blood clotting agents can be extended to seniors in the nursing home setting without hospitalization. Data from nine studies found hydroxychloroquine-based multidrug regimens were associated with a statistically significant > 60% reduction in mortality. Going forward, we conclude that early empiric treatment for the elderly with COVID-19 in the nursing home setting (or similar congregated settings with elderly residents/patients e.g. LTF or ALF) has a reasonable probability of success and acceptable safety. This group remains our highest at-risk group and warrants acute treatment focus prior to symptoms worsening. Given the rapidity and severity of SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks in nursing homes, in-center treatment of acute COVID-19 patients is a reasonable strategy to reduce the risks of hospitalization and death. If elderly high-risk patients in such congregated nursing home type settings are allowed to worsen with no early treatment, they may be too sick and fragile to benefit from in-hospital therapeutics and are at risk for pulmonary failure, life-ending micro-thrombi of the lungs, kidneys etc. The issue is timing of therapeutics, and we argue that early treatment before hospitalization, is the right time and can potentially save lives, especially among our higher-risk elderly populations hit hardest by severe illness and death from COVID-19. We must reiterate, we are talking about 'early' treatment before the disease is far along in the disease sequelae where the patient then needs hospitalization and aggressive interventions. We are referring to the initial days e.g. day one, post infection when symptoms emerge or there is strong clinical suspicion. This early therapeutic option deserves serious and urgent consideration by the medical establishment and respective decision-makers. Doctors must be allowed their clinical discretion in how they optimally treat their patients. Doctors must be brave and trust their skilled judgements and do all to save the lives of their patients. We therefore hypothesize that early outpatient ambulatory treatment, once initiated as soon as symptoms begin in high-risk positive persons, would significantly reduce hospitalizations and prevent deaths. Specifically, the provision of early multi-drug sequenced therapy with repurposed drugs will reduce hospitalization and death in elderly patients being cared for in long-term-care facilities. The most important implications of our hypothesis are: 1) hospitalizations and deaths would be reduced 2) transmission would be reduced due to the mitigation of symptoms and 3) recovery following infection and treatment provides for natural exposure immunity that is broad based, durable, and robust (helping towards natural immunity within the population). The end result is reduced strain on hospitals and systems that would allow for other non-COVID illnesses to receive care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2021.110622DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8178530PMC
June 2021

Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment is Consistently Effective for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: The Results of a Systematic Review of Treatment and Comparison to a Placebo Group.

Medicines (Basel) 2020 Jul 24;7(8). Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Illinois Sportsmedicine and Orthopaedic Center, Glenview, IL 60025, USA.

Numerous studies have used autologous mesenchymal stem cell injections (AMSCI) to treat osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that AMSCI is an effective osteoarthritis treatment with increasing efficacy at higher doses. We conducted a PubMed search for human clinical studies using AMSCI for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) and a second search for placebo arms of injectate OA treatment. Inclusion criteria included treatment outcomes ratings both pre-treatment and at least 6 months post-treatment. 45 AMSCI cohorts from 34 studies met criteria. All AMSCI cohorts showed improvement at mean 15.3 months post-treatment. Mean WOMAC and VAS scores improved at 6-months and at final follow-up ( < 0.0001 for all). Scores > 2 years were also significant (WOMAC = 0.001/VAS = 0.004). Results greatly exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) at each time point. AMSCI improvement also substantially exceeded previously published 6-month placebo-treatment improvement. No dose-response relationship was seen. AMSCI cohorts showed continuing improvement ≥ 6 months, and continued upward at one year. Placebo scores were already trending downward by 6 months. AMSCI is a consistently significantly effective treatment for osteoarthritis. It should no longer be stated that data is insufficient to establish AMSCI efficacy for OA. Given its excellent safety profile, AMSCI should be widely used for the treatment of osteoarthritis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicines7080042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7459966PMC
July 2020

Nitrogen sourcing during viral infection of marine cyanobacteria.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2019 07 15;116(31):15590-15595. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637.

The building blocks of a virus derived from de novo biosynthesis during infection and/or catabolism of preexisting host cell biomass, and the relative contribution of these 2 sources has important consequences for understanding viral biogeochemistry. We determined the uptake of extracellular nitrogen (N) and its biosynthetic incorporation into both virus and host proteins using an isotope-labeling proteomics approach in a model marine cyanobacterium WH8102 infected by a lytic cyanophage S-SM1. By supplying dissolved N as N postinfection, we found that proteins in progeny phage particles were composed of up to 41% extracellularly derived N, while proteins of the infected host cell showed almost no isotope incorporation, demonstrating that de novo amino acid synthesis continues during infection and contributes specifically and substantially to phage replication. The source of N for phage protein synthesis shifted over the course of infection from mostly host derived in the early stages to more medium derived later on. We show that the photosystem II reaction center proteins D1 and D2, which are auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs) in the S-SM1 genome, are made de novo during infection in an apparently light-dependent manner. We also identified a small set of host proteins that continue to be produced during infection; the majority are homologs of AMGs in S-SM1 or other viruses, suggesting selective continuation of host protein production during infection. The continued acquisition of nutrients by the infected cell and their utilization for phage replication are significant for both evolution and biogeochemical impact of viruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1901856116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6681717PMC
July 2019
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