Publications by authors named "John Kyle Feller"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microvessel density, lymphovascular density, and lymphovascular invasion in primary cutaneous melanoma-correlation with histopathologic prognosticators and BRAF status.

Hum Pathol 2015 Feb 26;46(2):304-12. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Dermatopathology Section, Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118. Electronic address:

The relationship between microvessel density (MVD), lymphovascular density (LVD), and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in primary cutaneous melanoma (PCM) remains unclear. Given this, a total of 102 PCMs were assessed for MVD (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and Endocan), LVD (D2-40), and LVI (immunostaining with D2-40/S-100 and hematoxylin and eosin); tumoral S-100A13, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and Endocan; and BRAF status. LVD was associated with MVD (P = .01). MVD was higher in PCMs with depth greater than or equal to 2 mm and ulceration (P = .04, .05), whereas LVD was higher in PCMs with depth greater than or equal to 2 mm and mitoses (P = .03, .02). After adjusting for MVD and LVD, only ulceration was associated with LVI (P < .02). A BRAF mutation was seen in 30.4% cases, and when present, both LVD and host response (P = .0008 and .04, respectively) were significantly associated with MVD. Immunostaining with S-100A13 was noted in 99% of cases and a significant association noted only with ulceration (P = .05). Immunostaining increased LVI positivity (46.5% versus 4.9% by hematoxylin and eosin, P < .0001). MVD and LVD are not associated with LVI, appear to be closely related with each other, and are associated with select markers of poor prognosticative value. The association between a host response and LVD and MVD in PCMs with a BRAF mutation suggests that they exhibit potential for strategizing immunotherapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2014.11.006DOI Listing
February 2015

Huntingtin interacting protein 1 as a histopathologic adjunct in the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma.

Int J Dermatol 2015 Jun 29;54(6):640-7. Epub 2014 Jul 29.

Department of Dermatology, Dermatopathology Section, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Huntington interacting protein 1 (HIP1), an antiapoptotic protein normally expressed in the brain, is highly expressed in Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs). Given this, the aim of the current study was to ascertain the value of HIP1 as a histopathologic adjunct in the diagnosis of MCC.

Methods: In this retrospective study, archival material from 26 cases with a diagnosis of MCC and/or neuroendocrine carcinoma were retrieved from the pathology files of the Skin Pathology Laboratory (Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA). Histopathologic sections of all cases were re-reviewed and the diagnosis confirmed. All patient data were de-identified. Immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies to HIP1 and cytokeratins (CK) 20 and 7.

Results: A semiquantitative scoring system for immunohistochemical expression of HIP1 was utilized by deriving a cumulative score (based on percentage positivity of cells and intensity of expression). Using a cut-off total score of 3 or more as positive, the total number of positive cases was 22 for HIP1, 24 for CK20, and 11 for CK7.

Conclusion: Comparing the results of HIP1 and CK20, there were four discordant pairs (three positive for CK20 but negative for HIP1 and one positive for HIP1 but negative for CK20). McNemar's test indicated that there was no statistical significance (P = 0.625), thereby implying a close agreement between the expression of HIP1 and CK20 in these neuroendocrine neoplasms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.12454DOI Listing
June 2015
-->