Publications by authors named "John E. Scoble"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Psychological intervention in fluid management.

Palliat Support Care 2006 Dec;4(4):419-24

Academic Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of General Hospital Psychiatry, GKT School of Medicine & Institute of Psychiatry, Weston Education Centre, London, UK.

Background: Hemodialysis is a palliative treatment for patients with established renal failure (ERF), and volume overload is a common problem for hemodialysis patients with low urinary output. Volume overload is thought to be mostly attributable to interdialytic fluid intake by the patient and is associated with an increased symptom burden and the development of serious medical complications. Repeated episodes of volume overload may adversely affect staff-patient relationships and the perception of care in this patient population. The aim of this case series study was to evaluate the effect and experience of a psychological intervention on interdialytic weight gain in a small group of patients.

Methods: Five patients were treated. The intervention involved using techniques derived from both cognitive behavior therapy and motivational interviewing. The main outcome measures were interdialytic weight gain and patient perception of the intervention.

Results: Three of the five patients reduced both mean interdialytic weight gain and the frequency with which they gained in excess of 3% of their dry weight during the intervention phase. The intervention was found to be acceptable to patients.

Significance Of Results: The intervention was effective in helping three of the five patients to reduce both the frequency and the severity of volume overload, and two of these patients maintained this for at least 6 months post intervention. The intervention used actively engaged the patients and appeared to be experienced positively. The methods used to mobilize patient resources and optimize staff-patient relationships as vehicles of change are discussed. Both may have implications for treatment concordance and the perception of care delivered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1478951506060512DOI Listing
December 2006

Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and renal function.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2006 Sep 21;21(9):2362-5. Epub 2006 Jul 21.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfl264DOI Listing
September 2006

The second United Kingdom Heart and Renal Protection (UK-HARP-II) Study: a randomized controlled study of the biochemical safety and efficacy of adding ezetimibe to simvastatin as initial therapy among patients with CKD.

Am J Kidney Dis 2006 Mar;47(3):385-95

Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK.

Background: Evaluating the effects of decreasing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels requires large randomized trials. In preparation for such a trial, we assessed the biochemical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of adding ezetimibe, 10 mg/d, to simvastatin, 20 mg/d, as initial therapy for such patients.

Methods: Two hundred three patients (152 predialysis patients with creatinine levels > or = 1.7 mg/dL [> or = 150 micromol/L], 18 patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy, and 33 patients on hemodialysis therapy) were randomly assigned to the administration of simvastatin, 20 mg/d, plus ezetimibe, 10 mg/d; or simvastatin, 20 mg, plus placebo ezetimibe daily.

Results: After 6 months, allocation to simvastatin monotherapy was associated with a 31-mg/dL (0.8-mmol/L) decrease in nonfasting LDL cholesterol levels compared with baseline. Allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe produced an additional 18-mg/dL (0.47-mmol/L) decrease in LDL cholesterol level, representing an incremental 21% reduction over that achieved with simvastatin monotherapy (P < 0.0001). There were no statistically significant effects of the addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin on triglyceride or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Ezetimibe was not associated with an excess risk of abnormal liver function test results or of elevated creatine kinase levels and did not impair absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. There were no serious adverse events caused by study treatment.

Conclusion: This 6-month study shows that the addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin, 20 mg/d, as initial therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease was well tolerated and produced an additional 21% decrease in LDL cholesterol levels. The clinical efficacy and safety of combination therapy in this population are now being assessed in a large randomized trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2005.11.018DOI Listing
March 2006

First United Kingdom Heart and Renal Protection (UK-HARP-I) study: biochemical efficacy and safety of simvastatin and safety of low-dose aspirin in chronic kidney disease.

Am J Kidney Dis 2005 Mar;45(3):473-84

Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford University, Oxford, UK.

Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, but the efficacy and safety of simvastatin and aspirin are unknown in this patient group.

Methods: Patients were randomly assigned in a 2 x 2 factorial design to the administration of: (1) 20 mg of simvastatin daily versus matching placebo, and (2) 100 mg of modified-release aspirin daily versus matching placebo.

Results: Overall, 448 patients with chronic kidney disease were randomly assigned (242 predialysis patients with a creatinine level > or = 1.7 mg/dL [> or =150 micromol/L], 73 patients on dialysis therapy, and 133 patients with a functioning transplant). Compliance with study treatments was 80% at 12 months. Allocation to treatment with 100 mg of aspirin daily was not associated with an excess of major bleeds (aspirin, 4 of 225 patients [2%] versus placebo, 6 of 223 patients [3%]; P = not significant [NS]), although there was a 3-fold excess of minor bleeds (34 of 225 [15%] versus 12 of 223 patients [5%]; P = 0.001). Among those with predialysis renal failure or a functioning transplant at baseline, aspirin did not increase the number of patients who progressed to dialysis therapy (7 of 187 [4%] versus 6 of 188 patients [3%]; P = NS) or experienced a greater than 20% increase in creatinine level (63 of 187 patients [34%] versus 56 of 188 patients [30%]; P = NS). After 12 months of follow-up, allocation to 20 mg of simvastatin daily reduced nonfasting total cholesterol levels by 18% (simvastatin, 163 mg/dL [4.22 mmol/L] versus placebo, 196 mg/dL [5.08 mmol/L]; P < 0.0001), directly measured low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 24% (89 mg/dL [2.31 mmol/L] versus 114 mg/dL [2.96 mmol/L]; P < 0.0001), and triglyceride levels by 13% (166 mg/dL [1.87 mmol/L] versus 186 mg/dL [2.10 mmol/L]; P < 0.01), but there was no significant effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (2% increase; P = NS). Allocation to simvastatin therapy was not associated with excess risk for abnormal liver function test results or elevated creatine kinase levels.

Conclusion: During a 1-year treatment period, simvastatin, 20 mg/d, produced a sustained reduction of approximately one quarter in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, with no evidence of toxicity, and aspirin, 100 mg/d, did not substantially increase the risk for a major bleeding episode. Much larger trials are now needed to assess whether these treatments can prevent vascular events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2004.11.015DOI Listing
March 2005

Renal angioplasty in non-atheromatous renal artery stenosis: technical results and clinical outcome in 43 patients.

Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 2004 Sep-Oct;27(5):435-40. Epub 2004 Jun 16.

Department of Radiology, Guys and St Thomas' Hospitals, London SE1 9RT, UK.

This study retrospectively reviewed the technical and clinical results of percutaneous transluminal renal artery angioplasty (PTRA) for non-atheromatous renal artery stenosis (RAS) in a Tertiary Renal Referral Centre. Forty-three patients (including 9 children) underwent 49 PTRA procedures for stenoses of 63 arteries over the period 1984-2001 (14 patients had bilateral stenosis treated during one procedure. There were 29 females and 14 males (age range 1-72 years, median 37 years). The etiology of the RAS was classical beaded FMD (medial fibroplasia) in 24, atypical or "variant FMD" with a more focal stenosis (intimal fibroplasia) in 11, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF) in 7 and Takayasu's Arteritis in 1. Five of the NF patients had angioplasty for stenoses following vascular repair procedures. A technically good result was obtained in 34/34 arteries with "classical" RAS, 9/13 atypical arteries, 11/15 arteries of NF patients and in the one Takayasu's case. Clinical follow-up for a mean of 16 months revealed a cure rate of hypertension in classical FMD of 35% with improvement in a further 55%. In the atypical FMD cases, follow-up was obtained on 6 patients with 2 cures and the other 4 demonstrating benefit. There was a better chance of cure in younger patients. In native artery PTRA in children with NF, only 1 out of 3 patients was 'cured' post-PTRA, and 2 out of 3 failed. However, in postsurgical stenoses in NF patients 1 out of 4 patients was 'cured' and 3 out of 4 improved. In conclusion, classical FMD responds well to PTRA with better results in younger patients. Atypical FMD, especially in children and when associated with NF, is less predictable. Stenoses consequent to revascularization surgery respond well to PTRA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00270-004-0135-0DOI Listing
August 2006

Do protection devices have a role in renal angioplasty and stent placement?

Authors:
John E Scoble

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2003 Sep;18(9):1700-3

Guys and St Thomas' Trust, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfg254DOI Listing
September 2003

Atheroembolism.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med 2002 Jun;4(3):255-265

Department of Renal Medicine, Guy's and St. Thomas Trust, St. Thomas Street, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom.

The many manifestations of atheroembolism are apparent in all specialties. However, with increasing intervention in older patients with atherosclerotic disease, it has become an important renal clinical problem. Atheroembolic disease is widely recognized as a cause of acute catastrophic renal dysfunction and recent important data have suggested that effective management protocols can improve outcome. It is probable that the clinical course is insidious in the majority of patients with severe atherosclerotic aortic disease. The management of these patients is less clear and at present rests on small anecdotal reports.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11936-002-0006-4DOI Listing
June 2002
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