Publications by authors named "John Dewey"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Empiric treatment for peritonsillar abscess: A single-center experience with medical therapy alone.

Am J Otolaryngol 2021 Jul-Aug;42(4):102954. Epub 2021 Feb 5.

Western Michigan University, Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, 300 Portage Street, Kalamazoo, MI 49007, United States of America. Electronic address:

Purpose: Compare the use of medical therapy alone (MTA) with surgical therapy (ST) for the empiric treatment of peritonsillar abscess (PTA).

Materials And Methods: A consecutive cohort of patients treated for PTA at our institution from May 2013 to February 2019 was analyzed. Demographics, disease characteristics, management strategies, and treatment outcomes were compared between treatment groups. Primary outcomes included treatment failure, defined as the need for follow-up surgical intervention, and complications within 2-weeks of empiric treatment.

Results: 306 patients (72.7%) received MTA while 115 (27.3%) underwent ST. There was no significant difference in the rate of treatment failure between the MTA (7.2%) and ST (6.1%) groups (p = 0.879). Complications were rare in both groups (1.6% with MTA versus 0.9% with ST; p = 0.898). Dysphagia (p = 0.011), trismus (p = 0.045), larger abscesses (p < 0.001), and hospital admission (p < 0.001) were more common in the ST group. Corticosteroid prescriptions were a common component of MTA (53.3%) and less often used with ST (33.9%; p = 0.001). After adjusting for abscess size, there remained no significant difference in the rate of treatment failure between groups. Univariate analyses demonstrated no significant independent predictors of treatment failure including age, sex, race, tonsillitis history, smoking history, presenting signs and symptoms, abscess size, hospital admission, and corticosteroid prescriptions.

Conclusions: MTA may be a safe and effective alternative to surgical drainage for the empiric treatment of PTA, warranting larger-scale prospective analyses. Abscess size did not appear to influence treatment failure; however, careful patient selection is likely to optimize treatment outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.102954DOI Listing
February 2021

Differentiating Pseudohyperkalemia From True Hyperkalemia in a Patient With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Diverticulitis.

Cureus 2020 Aug 17;12(8):e9800. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Biomedical Sciences, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, USA.

Acute changes in electrolyte levels can result in severe physiologic complications. Rapid treatment of abnormally elevated potassium levels is essential due to the increased risk of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. However, there are a number of circumstances that can lead to falsely elevated serum potassium levels, including fist clenching during phlebotomy and hemolysis of hematocytes during laboratory processing. Here we present a case of an elderly woman with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who presented with lower left quadrant pain and hematochezia. Laboratory tests revealed an elevated serum potassium level (7.5 mmol/L) on initial testing, in the absence of hyperkalemia symptoms, EKG changes, and hemolysis of the blood specimen. Abdominal CT revealed inflammatory changes consistent with diverticulitis. She was treated with intravenous calcium, insulin, glucose, and bicarbonate for her hyperkalemia and admitted for treatment for diverticulitis. A subsequent serum potassium level (3.9 mmol/L) and discussion with the hospitalist suggested a diagnosis of leukolysis-induced pseudohyperkalemia, and further treatment of hyperkalemia was halted. This case serves to remind current and future physicians about the importance of maintaining clinical suspicion and clarifying unexpected laboratory readings when the clinical picture and results do not completely align.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.9800DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7494421PMC
August 2020

Individual Differences in Sensitivity to Visuomotor Discrepancies.

Front Psychol 2019 4;10:144. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, United States.

This study explored whether sensitivity to visuomotor discrepancies, specifically the ability to detect and respond to loss of control over a moving object, is associated with other psychological traits and abilities. College-aged adults performed a computerized tracking task which involved keeping a cursor centered on a moving target using keyboard controls. On some trials, the cursor became unresponsive to participants' keypresses. Participants were instructed to immediately press the space bar if they noticed a loss of control. Response times (RTs) were measured. Additionally, participants completed a battery of behavioral and questionnaire-based tests with hypothesized relationships to the phenomenology of control, including measures of constructs such as locus of control, impulsiveness, need for cognition (NFC), and non-clinical schizotypy. Bivariate correlations between RTs to loss of control and high order cognitive and personality traits were not significant. However, a step-wise regression showed that better performance on the pursuit rotor task predicted faster RTs to loss of control while controlling for age, signal detection, and NFC. Results are discussed in relation to multifactorial models of the sense of agency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00144DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369185PMC
February 2019

Reply to Kennedy: Historical evidence supports remarkable breaking wave heights.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2018 02 8;115(9):E1939. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

School of Natural Science, Earth, and Ocean Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway H91 TK33, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1722292115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5834734PMC
February 2018

Storm, rogue wave, or tsunami origin for megaclast deposits in western Ireland and North Island, New Zealand?

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 12 27;114(50):E10639-E10647. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

School of Natural Science, Earth and Ocean Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway H91 TK33, Ireland

The origins of boulderite deposits are investigated with reference to the present-day foreshore of Annagh Head, NW Ireland, and the Lower Miocene Matheson Formation, New Zealand, to resolve disputes on their origin and to contrast and compare the deposits of tsunamis and storms. Field data indicate that the Matheson Formation, which contains boulders in excess of 140 tonnes, was produced by a 12- to 13-m-high tsunami with a period in the order of 1 h. The origin of the boulders at Annagh Head, which exceed 50 tonnes, is disputed. We combine oceanographic, historical, and field data to argue that this is a cliff-top storm deposit (CTSD). A numerical model for CTSDs is developed which indicates that boulder shape in addition to density and dimensions should be taken into account when applying hydrodynamic equations to such deposits. The model also predicts that the NE Atlantic storms are capable of producing boulderites that, when size alone is considered, cannot be distinguished from tsunamites. We review the characteristics that identify the origins of these two deposits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1713233114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5740672PMC
December 2017

A harbinger of plate tectonics: a commentary on Bullard, Everett and Smith (1965) 'The fit of the continents around the Atlantic'.

Authors:
John F Dewey

Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci 2015 Apr;373(2039)

University College, Oxford OX1 5NA, UK

In the 1960s, geology was transformed by the paradigm of plate tectonics. The 1965 paper of Bullard, Everett and Smith was a linking transition between the theories of continental drift and plate tectonics. They showed, conclusively, that the continents around the Atlantic were once contiguous and that the Atlantic Ocean had grown at rates of a few centimetres per year since the Early Jurassic, about 160 Ma. They achieved fits of the continental margins at the 500 fathom line (approx. 900 m), not the shorelines, by minimizing misfits between conjugate margins and finding axes, poles and angles of rotation, using Euler's theorem, that defined the unique single finite difference rotation that carried congruent continents from contiguity to their present positions, recognizing that the real motion may have been more complex around a number of finite motion poles. Critically, they were concerned only with kinematic reality and were not restricted by considerations of the mechanism by which continents split and oceans grow. Many of the defining features of plate tectonics were explicit or implicit in their reconstructions, such as the torsional rigidity of continents, Euler's theorem, closure of the Tethyan ocean(s), major continental margin shear zones, the rapid rotation of small continental blocks (Iberia) around nearby poles, the consequent opening of small wedge-shaped oceans (Bay of Biscay), and misfit overlaps (deltas and volcanic piles) and underlaps (stretched continental edges). This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2014.0227DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4360082PMC
April 2015

Do implicit and explicit measures of the sense of agency measure the same thing?

PLoS One 2014 16;9(10):e110118. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.

The sense of agency (SoA) refers to perceived causality of the self, i.e. the feeling of causing something to happen. The SoA has been probed using a variety of explicit and implicit measures. Explicit measures include rating scales and questionnaires. Implicit measures, which include sensory attenuation and temporal binding, use perceptual differences between self- and externally generated stimuli as measures of the SoA. In the present study, we investigated whether the different measures tap into the same self-attribution processes by determining whether individual differences on implicit and explicit measures of SoA are correlated. Participants performed tasks in which they triggered tones via key presses (operant condition) or passively listened to tones triggered by a computer (observational condition). We replicated previously reported effects of sensory attenuation and temporal binding. Surprisingly the two implicit measures of SoA were not significantly correlated with each other, nor did they correlate with the explicit measures of SoA. Our results suggest that some explicit and implicit measures of the SoA may tap into different processes.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0110118PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4199671PMC
October 2015

The phenomenology of controlling a moving object with another person.

Cognition 2014 Sep 28;132(3):383-97. Epub 2014 May 28.

Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Frankel Leó út 30-34, Budapest 1023, Hungary.

The phenomenology of controlling what one perceives is influenced by a combination of sensory predictions and inferential processes. While it is known that external perturbations can reduce the sense of control over action effects, there have been few studies investigating the impact of intentional co-actors on the sense of control. In three experiments, we investigated how individuals' judgments of control (JoC) over a moving object were influenced by sharing control with a second person. Participants used joysticks to keep a cursor centered on a moving target either alone or with a co-actor. When both participants' actions had similar perceptual consequences, JoC ratings were highest when self-generated movements were the only influence on the cursor, while the appearance of sharing control with a second person decreased JoC ratings. By contrast, when participants performed complementary actions with perceptually distinctive consequences, JoC ratings were highest when both participants were able to influence the cursor. The phenomenology of control during joint action is influenced by low-level visuomotor correlations, the presence of competing causal influences, and group-level performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2014.05.002DOI Listing
September 2014

Predictable and self-initiated visual motion is judged to be slower than computer generated motion.

Conscious Cogn 2013 Sep 19;22(3):987-95. Epub 2013 Jul 19.

Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Frankel Leó út 30-34, Budapest 1023, Hungary. Electronic address:

Self-initiated action effects are often perceived as less intense than identical but externally generated stimuli. It is thought that forward models within the sensorimotor system pre-activate cortical representations of predicted action effects, reducing perceptual sensitivity and attenuating neural responses. As self-agency and predictability are seldom manipulated simultaneously in behavioral experiments, it is unclear if self-other differences depend on predictable action effect contingencies, or if both self- and externally generated stimuli are modulated similarly by predictability. We factorially combined variation in (1) predictability of action effects, (2) spatial congruence, and (3) performance by the self or computer to dissociate these influences on a visual discrimination task. Participants performed 2AFC speed judgments. Self-initiated motion was judged to be slower than computer-initiated motion when action effect contingencies were predictable, while spatial congruence influenced speed judgments only when action effect contingencies were unpredictable. Results are discussed in relation to current theories of sensory attenuation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2013.06.007DOI Listing
September 2013

The ego as cause.

Authors:
John Dewey

Ann Neurosci 2013 Jul;20(3):116-7

First published in Philosophical Review, 3, 337-341 (Reprinted with permission).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5214/ans.0972.7531.200308DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4117121PMC
July 2013

When dyads act in parallel, a sense of agency for the auditory consequences depends on the order of the actions.

Conscious Cogn 2013 Mar 5;22(1):155-66. Epub 2013 Jan 5.

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States.

The sense of agency (SA) is the perception of willfully causing something to happen. Wegner and Wheatley (1999) proposed three prerequisites for SA: temporal contiguity between an action and its effect, congruence between predicted and observed effects, and exclusivity (absence of competing causal explanations). We investigated how temporal contiguity, congruence, and the order of two human agents' actions influenced SA on a task where participants rated feelings of self-agency for producing a tone. SA decreased when tone onsets were delayed, supporting contiguity as important, but the order of the agents' actions (lead, follow, or simultaneous) also mattered. Relative contiguity was the main determinant of SA, as delayed tones were usually attributed to the most recent action. This was unaffected by contingencies between the two actors' actions (Experiment 2), showing that contiguity has a powerful influence on SA, even during joint action in the presence of other cues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2012.12.004DOI Listing
March 2013

Relationship between BOLD amplitude and pattern classification of orientation-selective activity in the human visual cortex.

Neuroimage 2012 Nov 10;63(3):1212-22. Epub 2012 Aug 10.

Psychology Department and Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

Orientation-selective responses can be decoded from fMRI activity patterns in the human visual cortex, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). To what extent do these feature-selective activity patterns depend on the strength and quality of the sensory input, and might the reliability of these activity patterns be predicted by the gross amplitude of the stimulus-driven BOLD response? Observers viewed oriented gratings that varied in luminance contrast (4, 20 or 100%) or spatial frequency (0.25, 1.0 or 4.0 cpd). As predicted, activity patterns in early visual areas led to better discrimination of orientations presented at high than low contrast, with greater effects of contrast found in area V1 than in V3. A second experiment revealed generally better decoding of orientations at low or moderate as compared to high spatial frequencies. Interestingly however, V1 exhibited a relative advantage at discriminating high spatial frequency orientations, consistent with the finer scale of representation in the primary visual cortex. In both experiments, the reliability of these orientation-selective activity patterns was well predicted by the average BOLD amplitude in each region of interest, as indicated by correlation analyses, as well as decoding applied to a simple model of voxel responses to simulated orientation columns. Moreover, individual differences in decoding accuracy could be predicted by the signal-to-noise ratio of an individual's BOLD response. Our results indicate that decoding accuracy can be well predicted by incorporating the amplitude of the BOLD response into simple simulation models of cortical selectivity; such models could prove useful in future applications of fMRI pattern classification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3536495PMC
November 2012

Is that what I wanted to do? Cued vocalizations influence the phenomenology of controlling a moving object.

Conscious Cogn 2012 Mar 1;21(1):507-25. Epub 2012 Feb 1.

Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

The phenomenology of controlled action depends on comparisons between predicted and actually perceived sensory feedback called action-effects. We investigated if intervening task-irrelevant but semantically related information influences monitoring processes that give rise to a sense of control. Participants judged whether a moving box "obeyed" or "disobeyed" their own arrow keystrokes (Experiments 1 and 2) or visual cues representing the computer's choices (Experiment 3). During 1s delays between keystrokes/cues and box movements, participants vocalized directions ("up", "down", "left", or "right") cued by letters inside the box. Congruency of cued vocalizations was manipulated relative to previously selected keystrokes and upcoming box movements. In Experiment 1, reported obey moves and feelings of control reflected the true frequency of obey moves, but were also modulated by vocalizations. Incongruent vocalizations reduced reported obey moves, whereas congruent vocalizations increased them. In Experiment 2, vocalizations had stronger effects when their congruence with primary-task box movement was consistent for several consecutive moves before congruence changed. In Experiment 3, analogous impacts of vocalizations occurred when the computer selected the directions and participants judged whether the computer had control of the box. We conclude that predicted and perceived action-effects associated with semantically related but separate and ostensibly irrelevant actions can be conflated with one another. This interference is not restricted to actions performed with the same effector or within the same modality, or even by the same actor. Thus in estimating degrees of control, the mind integrates across ongoing action systems, whether or not they are logically task-relevant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2012.01.004DOI Listing
March 2012

Taking credit for success: the phenomenology of control in a goal-directed task.

Conscious Cogn 2010 Mar 14;19(1):48-62. Epub 2009 Oct 14.

Michigan State University, Department of Psychology, 292 Psychology Building, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

We studied how people determine when they are in control of objects. In a computer task, participants moved a virtual boat towards a goal using a joystick to investigate how subjective control is shaped by (1) correspondence between motor actions and the visual consequences of those actions, and (2) attainment of higher-level goals. In Experiment 1, random discrepancies from joystick input (noise) decreased judgments of control (JoCs), but discrepancies that brought the boat closer to the goal and increased success (the autopilot) increased JoCs. In Experiment 2, participants raced to the goal against a computer-controlled rival boat while varying levels of noise interfered with each boat. Participants reached the goal more often and rated their own control higher when the computer rival had good control. Subjective control over moving objects depends partly on consistency between motor actions and their effects, but is also modulated by perceived success and competition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2009.09.007DOI Listing
March 2010

Orogeny can be very short.

Authors:
John F Dewey

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2005 Oct 26;102(43):15286-93. Epub 2005 Aug 26.

Department of Geology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

In contrast to continent/continent collision, arc-continent collision generates very short-lived orogeny because the buoyancy-driven impedance of the subduction of continental lithosphere, accompanied by arc/suprasubduction-zone ophiolite obduction, is relieved by subduction polarity reversal (flip). This tectonic principle is illustrated by the early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British and Irish Caledonides, in which a wealth of detailed sedimentologic, heavy mineral, and geochronologic data pin the Orogeny to a very short Arenig/Llanvirn event. The Orogeny, from the initial subduction of continental margin sediments to the end of postflip shortening, lasted approximately 18 million years (my). The collisional shortening, prograde-metamorphic phase of the Orogeny lasted 8 my, extensional collapse and exhumation of midcrustal rocks lasted 1.5 my, and postflip shortening lasted 4.5 my. Strain rates were a typical plate-boundary-zone 10(-15). Metamorphism, to the second sillimanite isograd, with extensive partial melting, occurred within a few my after initial collision, indicating that conductive models for metamorphic heat transfer in Barrovian terrains are incorrect and must be replaced by advective models in which large volumes of mafic/ultramafic magma are emplaced, syn-tectonically, below and into evolving nappe stacks. Arc/continent collision generates fast and very short orogeny, regional metamorphism, and exhumation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0505516102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1266104PMC
October 2005
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