Publications by authors named "John Daniel DeBord"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Masked Multiplexed Separations to Enhance Duty Cycle for Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

Anal Chem 2021 04 2;93(14):5727-5734. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

MOBILion Systems Inc., Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 19317, United States.

The experimental paradigm of one ion packet release per spectrum severely hinders throughput in broadband ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) systems (e.g., drift tube and traveling wave systems). Ion trapping marginally mitigates this problem, but the duty cycle deficit is amplified when moving to high resolution, long pathlength systems. As a consequence, new multiplexing strategies that maximize throughput while preserving peak fidelity are essential for high-resolution IMS separations [e.g., structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIMs) and multi-pass technologies]. Currently, broadly applicable deconvolution strategies for Hadamard-based ion multiplexing are limited to a narrow range of modulation sequences and do not fully maximize the ion signal generated during separation across an extended path length. Compared to prior Hadamard deconvolution errors that rely upon peak picking or discrete error classification, the masked deconvolution matrix technique exploits the knowledge that Hadamard transform artifacts are reflected about the central, primary signal [i.e., the true arrival time distribution (ATD)]. By randomly inducing mathematical artifacts, it is possible to identify spectral artifacts simply by their high degree of variability relative to the core ATD. It is important to note that the deweighting approach using the masked deconvolution matrix does not make any assumptions about the underlying transform and is applicable to any multiplexing strategy employing binary sequences. In addition to demonstrating a 100-fold increase in the total number of ions detected, the effective deconvolution of data from 5, 6, 7, and 8-bit pseudo-random sequences expands the utility and efficiency of the SLIM platform.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c04799DOI Listing
April 2021

Lipid specific molecular ion emission as a function of the primary ion characteristics in TOF-SIMS.

J Vac Sci Technol B Nanotechnol Microelectron 2016 Sep 24;34(5):051804. Epub 2016 Aug 24.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University , Miami, Florida 33199 and Biomolecular Science Institute, Florida International University , Miami, Florida 33199.

In the present work, the emission characteristics of lipids as a function of the primary ion cluster size and energy were studied using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Characteristic fragmentation patterns for common lipids are described, and changes in secondary ion (SI) yields using various primary ion beams are reported. In particular, emission characteristics were studied for pairs of small polyatomic and nanoparticle primary ion beams (e.g., Bi versus Ar and Au versus Au) based on the secondary ion yield of characteristic fragment and intact molecular ions as a function of the lipid class. Detailed descriptions of the fragmentation patterns are shown for positive and negative mode TOF-SIMS. Results demonstrate that the lipid structure largely dictates the spectral presence of molecular and/or fragment ions in each ionization mode due to the localization of the charge carrier (head group or fatty acid chain). Our results suggest that the larger the energy per atom for small polyatomic projectiles (Bi and Au), the larger the SI yield; in the case of nanoparticle projectiles, the SI increase with primary ion energy (200-500 keV range) for Au and with the decrease of the energy per atom (10-40 eV/atom range) for Ar clusters. The secondary ion yield of the molecular ion of lipids from a single standard or from a mixture of lipids does not significantly change with the primary ion identity in the positive ion mode TOF-SIMS and slightly decreases in the negative ion mode TOF-SIMS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1116/1.4961461DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5001976PMC
September 2016

Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosive molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements.

Analyst 2015 Aug;140(16):5692-9

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA.

Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailor the stability of the molecular adduct complex. The flexibility of TIMS to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments/low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with high confidence levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c5an00527bDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4516649PMC
August 2015

Secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams.

PLoS One 2014 9;9(6):e99319. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, United States of America.

High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0099319PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4049834PMC
October 2015

Ion dynamics in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer.

Analyst 2014 Apr;139(8):1913-21

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, USA.

In the present paper, theoretical simulations and experimental observations are used to describe the ion dynamics in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer. In particular, the ion motion, ion transmission and mobility separation are discussed as a function of the bath gas velocity, radial confinement, analysis time and speed. Mobility analysis and calibration procedure are reported for the case of sphere-like molecules for positive and negative ion modes. Results showed that a maximal mobility resolution can be achieved by optimizing the gas velocity, radial confinement (RF amplitude) and ramp speed (voltage range and ramp time). The mobility resolution scales with the electric field and gas velocity and R = 100-250 can be routinely obtained at room temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c3an02174bDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4144823PMC
April 2014