Publications by authors named "Johanna Sahlman"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lung function and side effects of Aspirin desensitization: a real world study.

Eur Clin Respir J 2021 Jan 11;8(1):1869408. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

: NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (N-ERD) is mainly treated with topical and oral corticosteroids, as well as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment after desensitization (ATAD). During desensitization and ATAD, it is common to experience an exacerbation of respiratory symptoms and other side effects, which may lead to cessation of treatment. : The aim of this retrospective follow-up study was to evaluate the effect of ATAD on lung functions and respiratory symptoms, and to clarify the occurrence of adverse events. s: We analysed the patient data of 67 patients treated with ASA desensitization between 2006 and 2016 in three hospitals, concerning adverse events, respiratory symptoms, lung function tests, and reasons for discontinuation. : 26 patients discontinued AD or ATAD. The most common reasons for discontinuation were lack of response (9%) and side effects (18%). ATAD did not affect lung function values in the follow-up of up to 5 years. Upper respiratory symptoms improved in 31 (52%) and lower respiratory symptoms (LRS) in 7 (10%) cases. Side effects occurred in 42 (63%) cases, the most common being dyspepsia and lower respiratory symptoms. : Our study suggests that ATAD has little effect on lower airway functions. Side effects were common, and discontinuation rates high.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20018525.2020.1869408DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7808387PMC
January 2021

Factors affecting upper airway control of NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease: A real-world study of 167 patients.

Immun Inflamm Dis 2021 Mar 5;9(1):80-89. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Inflammation Center, Skin and Allergy Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exacerbated respiratory disease (N-ERD) is a triad with asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, and NSAID intolerance. Uncontrolled N-ERD forms a major public health problem due to frequent and difficult-to-treat exacerbations and/or requiring putatively frequent endoscopic sinus surgeries (ESS). Our aim was to study factors affecting control of N-ERD.

Methods: Retrospective patient record data (patient characteristics, prior sinus surgeries, follow-up data in 2020) from 167 N-ERD patients undergoing consultation at three tertiary hospitals from 2001 to 2017 was used. Outcome measurements reflecting uncontrolled N-ERD were revision ESS, corticosteroids/biological therapy, and antibiotic courses during 2016-2020. Associations were analyzed by using nonparametric tests, Cox's proportional hazard, and binary logistic regression models.

Results: Nasal polyp eosinophilia increased the risk of revision surgery during the follow-up (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 3.21, confidence interval 1.23-8.38). Also baseline oral corticosteroids (OCS; HR, 1.73, 1.04-2.89) and baseline surgery without total ethmoidectomy increased the risk of revision ESS (HR, 2.17, 1.07-4.42) in unadjusted models. In addition, both baseline OCS (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.78, 1.23-6.26) and a history of ≥4 previous ESS (aOR, 2.15, 0.98-4.70) were associated with the use of OCS/biological therapy during the follow-up, but not with high number of antibiotics.

Conclusions: Nasal polyp eosinophilia, baseline OCS, and a history of recurrent ESS predict uncontrolled N-ERD. These factors might be clinically useful in risk-estimation of uncontrolled disease and for organizing follow-ups. Prospective cohort studies with larger sample size are needed to further study the factors affecting the upper airway control of N-ERD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iid3.347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7860608PMC
March 2021

High Discontinuation Rates of Peroral ASA Treatment for CRSwNP: A Real-World Multicenter Study of 171 N-ERD Patients.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2020 Nov - Dec;8(10):3565-3574. Epub 2020 Jul 18.

Inflammation Centre, Skin and Allergy Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Medicum, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exacerbated respiratory disease (N-ERD) consists of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP), asthma, and NSAID intolerance. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment after desensitization (ATAD) is a treatment option for uncontrolled N-ERD.

Objective: To evaluate peroral ATAD's long-term effectiveness on CRSwNP disease control.

Methods: The retrospective data (patient characteristics, sinus surgeries before ATAD, ATAD, follow-up data [2019]) were collected from patient records of 171 patients with N-ERD (102 ATAD patients, 69 controls with CRSwNP+N-ERD without ATAD) who underwent tertiary hospital consultation from 2001 to 2017. Outcome measurements were ATAD discontinuation, revision sinus surgery, and corticosteroid and antibiotic courses for airway infections during 2016-2019. Associations were analyzed by survival and nonparametric methods.

Results: The ATAD group had more tissue eosinophilia, symptoms, and sinus surgeries before ATAD than others. The ATAD discontinuation rate was 63%, independent of ATAD dose or duration, usually due to side effects. Compared with the N-ERD group without ATAD, ATAD (mean duration, 2.9 years) did not affect the revision endoscopic sinus surgery rate (P = .21, by the log-rank test) or the number of peroral corticosteroid courses per year (P > .05, by the Mann-Whitney U-test) during the follow-up (mean, 7.6 years) despite the dose or duration of ATAD.

Conclusions: The discontinuation rate of ATAD was high (63%), and ATAD did not affect revision sinus surgery rate nor the need of peroral corticosteroids during follow-up. However, the remaining 37% of the ATAD group did continue the treatment, indicating that they may have benefited from ATAD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.06.063DOI Listing
July 2020

Mild obstructive sleep apnea does not modulate baroreflex sensitivity in adult patients.

Nat Sci Sleep 2015 25;7:73-80. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland ; Oivauni Sleep Clinic, Kuopio, Finland.

Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic and progressive disease. OSA is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, the risk being more frequently encountered with severe degrees of OSA. Increased sympathetic activation and impaired cardiac autonomic control as reflected by depressed baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) are possible mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular complications of OSA. However, it is not known at what stage of OSA that changes in BRS appear. The aim of this study was to evaluate BRS in patients with mild OSA.

Methods: The study population consisted of 81 overweight patients with mild OSA and 46 body weight-matched non-OSA subjects. BRS, apnea-hypopnea index, body mass index, and metabolic parameters were assessed. The phenylephrine test was used to measure BRS.

Results: Patients in the OSA group were slightly but significantly older than the non-OSA population (50.3±9.3 years vs 45.7±11.1 years, P=0.02). Body mass index, percentage body fat, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid levels did not differ between the OSA patients and non-OSA subjects. Absolute BRS values in patients with mild OSA and non-OSA subjects (9.97±6.70 ms/mmHg vs 10.51±7.16 ms/mmHg, P=0.67) and BRS values proportional to age-related and sex-related reference values (91.4%±22.7% vs 92.2%±21.8%, P=0.84) did not differ from each other. BRS <50% of the sex-specific reference value was found in 6% of patients with mild OSA and in 2% of non-OSA subjects (P=0.29).

Conclusion: Patients with mild OSA did not show evidence of disturbed BRS in comparison with weight-matched non-OSA controls.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NSS.S82443DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4487157PMC
July 2015

The impact of weight reduction in the prevention of the progression of obstructive sleep apnea: an explanatory analysis of a 5-year observational follow-up trial.

Sleep Med 2014 Mar 31;15(3):329-35. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Clinical Research Center, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic progressive disease, and it is well-documented that severe OSA is associated with an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Weight reduction has been shown to improve OSA; however, we need further evidence to determine if it may prevent the progression of OSA in the long term. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of weight change during a 5-year observational follow-up of an original 1-year randomized controlled trial.

Methods: The participants were divided into the two groups according to the weight change at 5-year follow-up using the 5% weight loss as a cutoff point, which was later referred to as the successful (n = 20) or unsuccessful groups (n = 27). The change in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was the main objective outcome variable.

Results: Fifty-seven patients participated in the 5-year follow-up. At 5 years from the baseline, the change in AHI between the groups was significant in the successful group (-3.5 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -6.1 to -0.9]) compared with the unsuccessful group (5.0 [95% CI, 2.0-8.5]) (P = .002). Successful weight reduction achieved an 80% reduction in the incidence of progression of OSA compared to the unsuccessful group (log-rank test, P = .016).

Conclusions: A moderate but sustained weight reduction can prevent the progression of the disease or even cure mild OSA in obese patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2013.11.786DOI Listing
March 2014

Endothelial function is well preserved in obese patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

Sleep Breath 2014 Mar 4;18(1):177-86. Epub 2013 Jun 4.

Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital, and University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1777, 70211, Kuopio, Finland,

Purpose: Endothelial dysfunction is one of the early markers of cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of our study was to evaluate whether overweight patients with mild OSA displayed endothelial dysfunction, and to assess the effect of 1-year lifestyle intervention with an early very low calorie diet in endothelial function.

Methods: At baseline, the study population consisted of 83 overweight patients with mild OSA and 46 weight-matched non-OSA subjects. OSA patients were further randomized into a 1-year supervised lifestyle intervention group or control group which received routine lifestyle counselling. Endothelial function measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), body mass index (BMI), and metabolic parameters were assessed at baseline and 12 months.

Results: No correlations between endothelial function and mild OSA were detected. However, patients with impaired endothelial function had lower mean saturation and impaired endothelial function correlated significantly with glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. After the lifestyle intervention and successful weight reduction, AHI, BMI, serum triglycerides and insulin improved significantly; however, no improvement in FMD was detected.

Conclusions: Mild OSA was not observed to be associated with endothelial dysfunction. Although in mild OSA endothelial function is still preserved, lifestyle intervention with weight reduction did achieve an improvement in other obesity-related risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, thus highlighting the importance of early intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-013-0867-7DOI Listing
March 2014

The association between anxiety and the degree of illness in mild obstructive sleep apnoea.

Clin Respir J 2013 Apr;7(2):197-203

Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been reported to associate with anxiety, but earlier observations are scarce and the role of the persistence of anxiety in this connection is unclear.

Objectives: To examine the associations between OSA and anxiety, and in particular clarify the observations regarding the role of the persistence of anxiety in this connection.

Methods: A total of 61 overweight patients with mild OSA participated in a 12-month lifestyle modification study and reported the presence of anxiety both at baseline and on 12-month follow up. They were divided into three groups (no anxiety, n = 25; past anxiety, n = 13; persistent anxiety, n = 23), and the degree of illness was assessed with the apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI).

Results: The persistence of anxiety was linearly associated with the AHI (P = 0.025), which was highest in individuals with persistent anxiety. The likelihood of belonging to the group with persistent anxiety increased 18% for each one-unit increase in the AHI in a model adjusted for age, gender and bodyfat % (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.34, P = 0.014). Further adjustments for daytime sleepiness and the effect of participating in the lifestyle modification intervention did not alter this finding.

Conclusion: Our observations suggest that the persistence of anxiety is independently associated with elevated levels of sleep-disordered breathing and that lifestyle modification interventions with a focus on diet and exercise alone may not be sufficient to treat OSA in individuals with simultaneous persistent anxiety.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-699X.2012.00304.xDOI Listing
April 2013

Impaired nasal breathing may prevent the beneficial effect of weight loss in the treatment of OSA.

Rhinology 2011 12;49(5):587-92

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.

Background: Weight loss is considered an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in overweight patients. Some patients, however, do not benefit from weight loss. It has been postulated that nasal obstruction may act as an independent risk factor for OSA.

Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate whether impaired nasal airflow might explain the missing effect of weight reduction on OSA.

Methodology: Fifty-two overweight adult patients with mild OSA were recruited. After the 12-month lifestyle intervention, all patients who achieved more than 5% weight loss were divided into two groups based on whether they still had OSA or not. Change in nasal resistance measured by rhinomanometer and AHI were the main outcome variables.

Results: A total of 26/52 patients achieved 5% weight reduction. Of those 26 patients, 16 were objectively cured from OSA and 10 patients did not benefit from weight loss. Nasal resistance reduced significantly more in patients who had been cured from OSA. Smoking had a negative impact on both nasal resistance and improvement of AHI.

Conclusions: Impaired nasal breathing and smoking may prevent the beneficial effects of weight reduction in the treatment of OSA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4193/Rhin11.131DOI Listing
December 2011

Sustained improvement in mild obstructive sleep apnea after a diet- and physical activity-based lifestyle intervention: postinterventional follow-up.

Am J Clin Nutr 2010 Oct 11;92(4):688-96. Epub 2010 Aug 11.

Institute of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital, and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

Background: Obesity is the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Weight-reduction programs have been observed to represent effective treatment of overweight patients with OSA. However, it is not known whether beneficial changes remain after the end of the intervention.

Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the long-term efficacy of a lifestyle intervention based on a healthy diet and physical activity in a randomized, controlled, 2-y postintervention follow-up in OSA patients.

Design: Eighty-one consecutive overweight [body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 28-40] adult patients with mild OSA were recruited. The intervention group completed a 1-y lifestyle modification regimen that included an early 12-wk weight-reduction program with a very-low-calorie diet. The control group received routine lifestyle counseling. During the second year, no dietary counseling was offered. Change in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was the main objective outcome variable, and changes in symptoms were used as a subjective measurement.

Results: A total of 71 patients completed the 2-y follow-up. The mean (± SD) changes in diet and lifestyle with simultaneous weight reduction (-7.3 ± 6.5 kg) in the intervention group reflected sustained improvements in findings and symptoms of OSA. After 2 y, the reduction in the AHI was significantly greater in the intervention group (P = 0.049). The intervention lowered the risk of OSA at follow-up; the adjusted odds ratio for OSA was 0.35 (95% CI: 0.12-0.97; P = 0.045).

Conclusion: Favorable changes achieved by a 1-y lifestyle intervention aimed at weight reduction with a healthy diet and physical activity were sustained in overweight patients with mild OSA after the termination of supervised lifestyle counseling. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00486746.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2010.29485DOI Listing
October 2010

The activation of the inflammatory cytokines in overweight patients with mild obstructive sleep apnoea.

J Sleep Res 2010 Jun 16;19(2):341-8. Epub 2009 Dec 16.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.

It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked with cardiovascular diseases. The relationship is complex and remains still poorly understood. The presence of chronic systemic inflammation has been connected with pathogenesis of both OSA and cardiovascular diseases. While atherogenesis is believed to be a process of many years, little is known about the potential impact of the largest OSA subgroup, mild OSA, on the development of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess whether untreated mild OSA is associated with an activation of inflammatory cytokine system. The adult study population consisted of two groups: 84 patients with mild OSA [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) 5-15 h(-1)] and 40 controls (AHI <5 h(-1)). Serum concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured before any interventions. After adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, fat percentage, most important cardiometabolic and inflammatory diseases, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, the mean level of tumour necrosis factor-alpha was significantly elevated (1.54 versus 1.17 pg mL(-1), P = 0.004), whereas the level of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) was reduced (0.19 versus 0.23 pg mL(-1), P = 0.004) in patients with mild OSA compared with controls. The concentrations of the protective anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 (1.28 versus 0.70 pg mL(-1), P < 0.001) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (478 versus 330 pg mL(-1), P = 0.003) were elevated in the OSA group. The concentrations of C-reactive protein increased, but IL-1 beta decreased along with the increase of AHI. Mild OSA was found to be associated not only with the activation of the pro-inflammatory, but also with the anti-inflammatory systems.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2009.00787.xDOI Listing
June 2010

Surgical intervention represents a feasible option for patients with mild obstructive sleep apnoea.

Acta Otolaryngol 2009 Nov;129(11):1266-73

Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.

Conclusions: Patients with mild obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) depict the disease as being detrimental to their health, causing significant symptoms. These patients were found to achieve significant improvements in OSA-related symptoms after surgical intervention.

Objectives: Although the effects of surgical treatment on OSA have been encouraging in many previous studies, little is known about its effects in patients with mild OSA. The aim of our study was to assess the evolution of symptoms experienced by mild OSA patients after surgical intervention.

Subjects And Methods: This was an observational follow-up study in a university hospital in Finland. The change in daytime and night-time symptoms was assessed by a standardized questionnaire before treatment and after a mean follow-up time of 3 years in both operative and control groups in 81 adult patients with mild OSA.

Results: At the follow-up, the control group experienced significantly more daytime sleepiness (p<0.001) compared with the operative group. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) for daytime sleepiness was 0.05 (95% CI 0.01-0.25, p<0.001) in operatively treated patients as compared with control patients, with improvement of witnessed apnoeas (p<0.001) and sleep quality (p=0.033). The OR for intensive snoring was 0.06 (95% CI 0.02-0.22) in the operative group as compared with the control group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016480802595724DOI Listing
November 2009

Lifestyle intervention with weight reduction: first-line treatment in mild obstructive sleep apnea.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2009 Feb 14;179(4):320-7. Epub 2008 Nov 14.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Kuopio, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland.

Rationale: Obesity is the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, although included in clinical guidelines, no randomized controlled studies have been performed on the effects of weight reduction on mild OSA.

Objectives: The aim of this prospective, randomized controlled parallel-group 1-year follow-up study was to determine whether a very low calorie diet (VLCD) with supervised lifestyle counseling could be an effective treatment for adults with mild OSA.

Methods: Seventy-two consecutive overweight patients (body mass index, 28-40) with mild OSA were recruited. The intervention group (n = 35) completed the VLCD program with supervised lifestyle modification, and the control group (n = 37) received routine lifestyle counseling. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was the main objectively measured outcome variable. Change in symptoms and the 15D-Quality of Life tool were used as subjective measurements.

Measurements And Main Results: The lifestyle intervention was found to effectively reduce body weight (-10.7 +/- 6.5 kg; body mass index, -3.5 +/- 2.1 [mean +/- SD]). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean change in AHI between the study groups (P = 0.017). The adjusted odds ratio for having mild OSA was markedly lowered (odds ratio, 0.24 [95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.72]; P = 0.011) in the intervention group. All common symptoms related to OSA, and some features of 15D-Quality of Life improved after the lifestyle intervention. Changes in AHI were strongly associated with changes in weight and waist circumference.

Conclusions: VLCD combined with active lifestyle counseling resulting in marked weight reduction is a feasible and effective treatment for the majority of patients with mild OSA, and the achieved beneficial outcomes are maintained at 1-year follow-up.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200805-669OCDOI Listing
February 2009

Effect of weight reduction on rhinometric measurements in overweight patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

Am J Rhinol 2008 Jul-Aug;22(4):410-5

Institute of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.

Background: Elevated nasal resistance and obesity predispose to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Weight loss has been shown to result in an alleviation of OSA, but its effect on nasal airflow has not been studied.

Methods: This study was a prospective, randomized, controlled study with two parallel groups. A total of 52 adult overweight patients (body mass index [BMI], 28-40 kg/m2) with mild obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 5-15) were randomized into two study groups. The intervention group (n = 26) followed a very low calorie diet with a supervised lifestyle intervention while the control group (n = 26) received routine lifestyle counseling. The changes in BMI, total nasal resistance, total nasal volume, and quality of life scores (Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire, MiniRQLQ) were assessed at baseline and after the intervention at 3 months.

Results: The reduction in BMI in the intervention group was significantly greater than that achieved by patients in the control group (5.4 kg/m2 versus 0.5 kg/m2). Accordingly, AHI was reduced by 3.2 events/hour in the intervention group and by 1.3 in the control group. However, there were no significant changes in rhinometric measurements despite significant weight loss. There was no correlation between the reduction of BMI and the change in nasal resistance or MiniRQLQ scores.

Conclusion: Weight reduction does not seem to have any effect on nasal resistance or volume in overweight patients with mild OSA. Patients with OSA and impaired nasal breathing need specific medical or surgical treatment to restore nasal airflow.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/ajr.2008.22.3203DOI Listing
October 2008

Evolution of mild obstructive sleep apnea after different treatments.

Laryngoscope 2007 Jun;117(6):1107-11

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.

Study Objectives: To evaluate the prognosis of mild obstructive sleep apnea in relation to different treatment modalities.

Study Design: An open, retrospective, longitudinal follow-up study.

Methods: Fifty adult patients diagnosed and treated for mild obstructive sleep apnea at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Kuopio University Hospital between 1998 and 2004 had a control polysomnography in 2005. The changes in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were observed in untreated (n = 28), operative (n = 11), and continuous positive airway pressure (n = 11) treatment groups at a long-term follow-up visit.

Results: The mean follow-up period was 4 (range, 1.3-9.0; SD, 1.9) years. The untreated patients had a statistically significant increase in AHI (13.3, SD 18.3) at the follow-up. Half of these patients developed a moderate or severe degree of sleep apnea, and only 11% were cured. In patients who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure, the degree of obstructive sleep apnea became worse in 64% of cases, and in 27% of patients, the AHI returned to normal (<5). The degree of obstructive sleep apnea in operated patients deteriorated only in 18%, and in 27% of the patients, the AHI returned to normal (<5).

Conclusions: Mild obstructive sleep apnea has a natural tendency to worsen with time. Active treatment of mild obstructive sleep apnea appears, therefore, to be advisable.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MLG.0b013e3180514d08DOI Listing
June 2007