Publications by authors named "Joanne Aimé"

3 Publications

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Sedimentological and geochemical data in bed sediments from a tropical river-estuary system impacted by a developing megacity, Ho Chi Minh City - Vietnam.

Data Brief 2020 Aug 27;31:105938. Epub 2020 Jun 27.

CARE, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, VNU-HCM, Viet Nam.

Sedimentological and geochemical data were obtained for bed sediments from a tropical estuary environment in Vietnam in October 2014, January 2016, and November 2016. The data include grain-size distribution, percentage of clay, silt and sand, percentage of organic matter, concentration of total particulate phosphorus (TPP), concentration of particulate inorganic phosphorus (PIP), concentration of particulate organic phosphorus (POP), percentage of total nitrogen (TN), percentage of total carbon (TC), trace metals concentrations (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Pb) and major elements (Al, Fe, Mn). Geochemical indexes (Enrichment factor EF and Geo-accumulation Index I-geo) and sediment quality guideline (mean Effect Range Median quotients) were calculated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2020.105938DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7339034PMC
August 2020

Nutrient dynamics and eutrophication assessment in the tropical river system of Saigon - Dongnai (southern Vietnam).

Sci Total Environ 2019 Feb 26;653:370-383. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

CARE, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, VNU-HCM, Viet Nam.

Saigon-Dongnai Rivers in Southern Vietnam is a complex lowland hydrological network of tributaries that is strongly influenced by the tidal cycles. The increasing economic, industrial and domestic developments in and around Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) have led to serious impacts on water quality due to lack of appropriate wastewaters treatment. Drinking water production is impacted and the large aquaculture production areas may also be affected. We analyzed spatial and seasonal variability of nutrient concentrations (Phosphorus, Nitrogen and Silica) and eutrophication indicators (Organic Carbon, Chlorophyll-a and Dissolved Oxygen) based on bi-monthly monitoring during two hydrological cycles (July 2015-December 2017). Four monitoring sites were selected to assess the impact of HCMC: two upstream stations on the Saigon River and Dongnai River branches to provide the reference water quality status before reaching the urbanized area of HCMC; one monitoring station in the city center to highlight Saigon River water quality within the heart of the megacity; the fourth station downstream of the confluence to evaluate the impact of HCMC on the estuarine waters. This study points to excess nutrients in HCMC's water body with concentrations of NH and PO averaging to 0.7 ± 0.6 mgN L and 0.07 ± 0.06 mgP L, respectively in mean over the monitored period and rising up to 3 mgN L and 0.2 mgP L, in extreme conditions. During the dry season, we evidenced that untreated domestic discharges leads to degradation of the Saigon River's water quality with extreme values of algal biomass (up 150 μChl-a L) and hypoxic conditions occurring episodically (DO < 2 mg L) in the heart of the megacity. Until now, eutrophication in the urban center has had no clear effect downstream because eutrophic water mass from the Saigon River is efficiently mixed with the Dongnai River and sea water masses during the successive semi-diurnal tidal cycles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.319DOI Listing
February 2019

Variability of CO emissions during the rearing cycle of a semi-intensive shrimp farm in a mangrove coastal zone (New Caledonia).

Mar Pollut Bull 2018 Apr 22;129(1):194-206. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

IMPMC, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), UPMC, CNRS, MNHN, Noumea, New Caledonia; University of Sciences of Ho Chi Minh City, Analytical Chemistry Department, 225 Nguyen Van Cu, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam. Electronic address:

In New Caledonia, shrimp ponds are built not on cleared mangroves but on salt flats behind the mangroves. The objectives of this study were to determine the variability of CO fluxes from a semi-intensive shrimp pond during active and non-active periods of the farm and to determine the carbon dynamics from the upstream tidal creek to the downstream creek, which receives the farm's effluents. CO emissions from the active pond were estimated at 11.1 ± 5.26 mmol CO m d. By modifying the hydrodynamics of the creeks, farm practices also influenced CO emissions from both the upstream and downstream creeks. After tillage, all the organic carbon deposited at the pond bottom during the active period was mineralized, resulting in CO emissions to the atmosphere estimated at 7.9 TCO ha. Therefore, shrimp farming is an anthropogenic source of CO to the atmosphere, but suitable and optimized rearing practices limit these emissions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.02.025DOI Listing
April 2018