Publications by authors named "Joanna Sulicka-Grodzicka"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Low-grade chronic inflammation and immune alterations in childhood and adolescent cancer survivors: A contribution to accelerated aging?

Cancer Med 2021 Mar 19;10(5):1772-1782. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.

Background: The long-term consequences of chemotherapy and radiotherapy result in a high prevalence and early onset of age-related chronic diseases in survivors. We aimed to examine whether childhood and adolescent cancer survivors (CS) demonstrate biomarkers of accelerated aging.

Methods: We evaluated 50 young adult CS at 11 [8-15] years after cancer diagnosis, and 30 healthy, age and sex-matched controls, who were unexposed to cancer therapy. Using a machine-learning approach, we assessed factors discriminating CS from controls and compared selected biomarkers and lymphocyte subpopulations with data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) cohort and the Genotype Tissue Expression (GTEx) project.

Results: Survivors compared with controls had higher levels of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. The surface expression of CD38 on T cells was increased, and there was an increase in the percentage of memory T cells in survivors, compared with the unexposed group. The relationships between above cell subpopulations and age were consistent in CS, FHS, and GTEx cohorts, but not in controls.

Conclusions: Young pediatric cancer survivors differ from age-related controls in terms of activation of the adaptive immune system and chronic, low-grade inflammation. These changes resemble aging phenotype observed in older population. Further research in biomarkers of aging in young, adult childhood cancer survivors is warranted, as it may facilitate screening and prevention of comorbidities in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.3788DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7940211PMC
March 2021

Decreased number of regulatory T lymphocytes is related to inflammation and number of CD8+ T cells expressing programmed cell death protein-1 in common variable immunodeficiency.

Folia Med Cracov 2020 11;60(3):5-16

Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder related to recurrent infections, as well as a range of non-infectious manifestations including autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. We hypothesized that patients with CVID and different clinical phenotypes would demonstrate alterations in lymphocyte T subsets, including T lymphocytes expressing programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), and regulatory T lymphocytes. We performed flow cytometry in two CVID groups: group 1 with infections only, and group 2 with infections and concomitant noninfectious manifestations. Patients were 18-59 years old (mean 35.8 years of age). Increased proportions of CD8+PD-1+ T cells and reduced regulatory T cells were associated with lymphadenopathy. Amount of regulatory T cells correlated with CD8+PD-1+ T lymphocytes (r = 0.54; p = 0.013), and with CRP (r = -0.64; p = 0.004). Forty percent of patients expressed manifestations in addition to infections (group 2), and they had reduction in number of regulatory T cells [8 (3-12) vs. 24 (11-26)/μl; p = 0.034), naive CD4+ T lymphocytes [36 (27-106) vs. 149 (81-283)/μl; p = 0.034], and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) [5.33 (3.15-8.82) vs. 1 (1-2.16) mg/l; p = 0.003] in comparison to group 1. In conclusion, the amount of CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1 is associated with lymphadenopathy and number of regulatory T cells in patients with CVID. Patients with CVID and non-infectious complications have increased level of inflammation and alterations in regulatory T cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24425/fmc.2020.135791DOI Listing
November 2020

Cranial Irradiation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Is Related to Subclinical Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Reduced Large Artery Compliance in Cancer Survivors.

J Clin Med 2019 Nov 13;8(11). Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 10 Śniadeckich Street, 31-531 Cracow, Poland.

Long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are at remarkably increased risk of heart failure (HF) in middle age, most likely due anthracycline cardiotoxicity. The role of cranial radiation therapy (CRT) in the development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, a predecessor of overt HF, remains unclear. Our aim was to compare LV function and systemic arterial properties according to past CRT in young adult survivors of anthracycline-treated ALL. We studied young adult survivors of childhood ALL at a median of 16 years from diagnosis treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy, with ( = 12) or without ( = 30) CRT. In addition to fractional shortening (FS) and ejection fraction (EF), LV function was quantified by tissue Doppler imaging of the mitral annulus. Aortic strain/distensibility and arterial compliance were derived from echocardiography and simultaneously recorded pulse pressure. Despite similar FS and EF, peak mitral annular systolic velocity (median (interquartile range): 9.0 (7.5-10.0) vs. 10.0 (8.8-11.5) cm/s, = 0.05), and early diastolic velocity (13.8 (13.0-14.8) vs. 15.5 (14.0-17.3), = 0.01) were decreased after chemotherapy combined with CRT compared to chemotherapy without CRT. Systemic arterial compliance was lower in post-CRT subjects (1.0 (0.8-1.2 vs. 1.4 (1.1-1.7) mL/mmHg, = 0.002). Aortic strain and distensibility were similar regardless of prior CRT. In conclusion, lower arterial compliance and subclinical LV dysfunction may be possible late consequences of past CRT in adult survivors of childhood ALL. Whether arterial stiffening is associated with future HF development in CRT-exposed ALL survivors remains to be investigated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6912438PMC
November 2019

Knowledge of rare diseases among health care students – the effect of targeted education

Przegl Epidemiol 2017;71(1):80-89

Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, Centre for Rare Cardiovascular Diseases at John Paul II Hospital, Kraków, Poland

Background: Poor knowledge on rare diseases (RD) results in a significant delay in their diagnosis and treatment. So far there are no standards of university education in RD. We assessed knowledge on RD among healthcare students and the effectiveness of targeted education.

Methods: We conducted an internet-based survey among students of the faculty of medicine, pharmacy and health sciences. Questions regarded personal information, definition and epidemic data on RD. The survey was used to assess the effect of targeted education about RD in an additional group of students.

Results: We enrolled 270 students (females: n=181; 67%), aged 22±1.7 years. Most of them (87.8%) declared to be familiar with the term RD. However only 20.7% knew the correct definition of RD, 14% knew that RD affect a significant (6-8%) proportion of population, 21.4% that there are 5-8 thousands of different RD’ entities, 73.7% recognized the most common cause of RD. 12.6% knew, that the RD most frequently occur in the adulthood. Targeted education applied in the additional group of 18 students resulted in a significant improvement of students’ knowledge on RD: definition (by 33%; p=0.007), percentage of population affected by RD (by 67%; p=0.001 ), total number of different RD (by 61%; p=0.003), time of onset of RD (by 61% p=0.003).

Conclusions: Despite the declared recognition of the term: RD, knowledge on RD among medical students is poor independently on the year of study. However it can be improved with use of targeted education.
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October 2017

Asymmetric dimethylarginine reflects cumulative inflammatory burden in rheumatoid arthritis. A novel mechanism of excessive cardiovascular morbidity?

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2015 Jul 27;54(7):1135-6. Epub 2015 Apr 27.

Małopolska Center for Rheumatology, Immunology and Rehabilitation, J. Dietl Hospital in Kraków, Department of Nephrology, Department of Rheumatology and Balneology, Jagiellonian University Medical College and University Hospital, Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Heart Failure, John Paul II Hospital in Kraków and Second Department of Cardiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College and University Hospital, Kraków, Poland

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kev104DOI Listing
July 2015

[Reccurent mycobacterial diseases in patients with impaired axis IL-12/INF-gamma].

Przegl Lek 2013 ;70(12):1058-60

Mycobacteria is a large group of pathogens that are common in environment, in soil and tap water. Although mycobacteria [non tuberculosis mycobacteria] can inhabit body surface without causing any disease in the circumstances of primary or secondary immunodeficiency can cause clinically significant organ or systemic damage. Defect of IL-12/INFgamma axis is an example of primary immunodeficiency that predispose to mycobacterial infections while protection against other microorganisms is not damaged. We present review of known defects of IL-12/IFNgamma axis and brief presentation of our own experience.
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May 2014