Publications by authors named "Joana Celiesiute"

2 Publications

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Circulating inflammatory markers in cervical cancer patients and healthy controls.

J Immunotoxicol 2020 12;17(1):105-109

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.

There is increasing evidence that host inflammatory responses play an important role in the development and progression of cancers. There are some data that cancer is associated not only with inflammation at the site of the lesion, but also with dysregulations of the host overall systemic immune response. In the case of cervical cancer, inflammation is an important factor associated with the development, progression, and potential metastasis of the disease. What is unclear still in the potential for modifications of host responses to human papillomaviruses (HPV) - a known causative agent of CC, that could be induced by cigarette smoking. In particular, it remains to be determined how the inflammation induced by HPV infection could impact on CC incidence/severity. In this prospective study, serum levels of 10 cytokines were evaluated using Multiplex and ELISA assays. The samples were the sera of 43 CC patients and 60 healthy (NILM) controls. All outcomes were evaluated in relation to host HPV and to their smoking status. The results in indicated that serum sTREM-1, TNFα, IFNβ, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were significantly increased in CC (HPV+) patients compared to healthy NILM controls. A similar trend was observed for IL-10 and IL-2 levels. Within the two groups, differences in cytokine levels between smokers and never smokers were not remarkable. The findings here support the hypothesized role of systemic inflammation in the pathophysiology of CC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1547691X.2020.1755397DOI Listing
December 2020

Associations among Serum Lipocalin-2 Concentration, Human Papilloma Virus and Clinical Stage of Cervical Cancer.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2019 May 30;55(6). Epub 2019 May 30.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, LT 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania.

Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) has an oncogenic role in promoting tumorigenesis through enhancing tumor cell proliferation and the metastatic potential. The aim of our study was to determine whether serum LCN2 could serve as a diagnostic marker of cervical cancer (CC) and to evaluate the correlation between its serum concentration, the clinical stage of the cancer and Human Papilloma Virus HPV infections in women. A total of 33 women with histologically proven cervical cancer (CC), 9 women with high- grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (HSIL) and 48 healthy women (NILM) were involved in the study. A concentration of LCN2 was assayed with the Magnetic LuminexR Assay multiplex kit. An HPV genotyping kit was used for the detection and differentiation of 15 high-risk (HR) HPV types in the liquid-based cytology medium (LBCM) and the tissue biopsy. The majority (84.8%) of the women were infected by HPV16 in the CC group, and there was no woman with HPV16 in the control group ( < 0.01). Several types of HR HPV were found more often in the LBCM compared to in the tissue biopsy ( = 0.044). HPV16 was more frequently detected in the tissue biopsy than the LBCM ( < 0.05). The LCN2 level was higher in HPV-positive than in HPV-negative women ( = 0.029). The LCN2 concentration was significantly higher in women with stage IV than those with stage I CC ( = 0.021). Conclusions: Many HR HPV types, together with HPV16/18, can colonize the vagina and cervix, but often HPV16 alone penetrates into the tissue and causes CC. The serum LCN2 concentration was found to be associated not only with HR HPV infection, irrespective of the degree of cervical intraepithelial changes, but also with advanced clinical CC stage. LCN2 could be used to identify patients with advanced disease, who require a more aggressive treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina55060229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6630730PMC
May 2019