Publications by authors named "Jitka Pavlikova"

2 Publications

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Gene expression profiling in healthy newborns from diverse localities of the Czech Republic.

Environ Mol Mutagen 2018 06 30;59(5):401-415. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Institute of Experimental Medicine of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.

Prenatal exposure to air pollution is associated with intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight. Gene expression changes in newborns in relation to air pollution have not been sufficiently studied. We analyzed whole genome expression in cord blood leukocytes of 202 newborns from diverse localities of the Czech Republic, differing among other factors in levels of air pollution: the district of Karvina (characterized by higher concentration of air pollutants) and Ceske Budejovice (lower air pollution levels). We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and pathways in relation to locality and concentration of air pollutants. We applied the linear model to identify the specific DEGs and the correlation analysis, to investigate the relationship between the concentrations of air pollutants and gene expression data. An analysis of biochemical pathways and gene set enrichment was also performed. In general, we observed modest changes of gene expression, mostly attributed to the effect of the locality. The highest number of DEGs was found in samples from the district of Karvina. A pathway analysis revealed a deregulation of processes associated with cell growth, apoptosis or cellular homeostasis, immune response-related processes or oxidative stress response. The association between concentrations of air pollutants and gene expression changes was weak, particularly for samples collected in Karvina. In summary, as we did not find a direct effect of exposure to air pollutants, we assume that the general differences in the environment, rather than actual concentrations of individual pollutants, represent a key factor affecting gene expression changes at delivery. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:401-415, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/em.22184DOI Listing
June 2018

Mapping the factors affecting the frequency and types of micronuclei in an elderly population from Southern Bohemia.

Mutat Res 2016 Nov - Dec;793-794:32-40. Epub 2016 Oct 26.

Institute of Radiology, Toxicology and Civil Protection, University of South Bohemia, 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czechia.

The micronucleus assay is one of the most common methods used to assess chromosomal damage (losses or breaks) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in genetic toxicology. Most studies have focused on analyzing total micronuclei (MN), but identifying the content of MN can provide more detailed information. The main aim of this study was to map the factors affecting the frequency and types of micronuclei in binucleated cells (BNC) in elderly population. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using Human Pan Centromeric Chromosome Paint was used to identify centromere positive (CEN+) or centromere negative (CEN-) MN. A group of 95 men from Southern Bohemia, Czech Republic (average age 68.0±6.8 years) was followed repeatedly, in spring and fall 2014. The study participants were former workers of the uranium plant "MAPE Mydlovary" (processing uranium ore from 1962 to 1991), and controls. The general profile of individual types of MN, and the effect of the season, former uranium exposure, age, smoking status, weight, and X-ray examination on the level and type of MN were analyzed. The results of this study showed: (i) a stable profile of BNC with MN based on the number of MN during two seasons; (ii) an increase of the number of CEN+ MN from spring to fall; (iii) a lower frequency of the total MN in the exposed group than in controls with a significant difference in the percentage of aberrant cells (%AB.C.) in the fall; (iv) no clear effect of age, smoking and BMI on DNA damage in this group; (v) lower DNA damage levels in former uranium workers who received X-ray examination later in life. In summary, the results indicate a trend of seasonal changes of individual types of MN and suggest that former exposure can have a protective effect on the level of DNA damage in case of future exposure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2016.10.004DOI Listing
May 2017