Publications by authors named "Jirawat Saengsin"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cleidocranial dysplasia and novel RUNX2 variants: dental, craniofacial, and osseous manifestations.

J Appl Oral Sci 2022 6;30:e20220028. Epub 2022 Jun 6.

Chulalongkorn University , Faculty of Medicine , Department of Pediatrics, Medical Genomics Cluster , Center of Excellence for Medical Genomics, Bangkok , Thailand .

Objectives: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a skeletal disorder affecting cranial sutures, teeth, and clavicles, and is associated with the RUNX2 mutations. Although numerous patients have been described, a direct genotype-phenotype correlation for RUNX2 has been difficult to establish. Further cases must be studied to understand the clinical and genetic spectra of CCD. To characterize detailed phenotypes and identify variants causing CCD in five unrelated patients and their family members.

Methodology: Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed. Genetic variants were identified by exome and Sanger sequencing, data were analyzed by bioinformatics tools.

Results: Three cases were sporadic and two were familial. Exome sequencing successfully detected the heterozygous pathogenic RUNX2 variants in all affected individuals. Three were novel, comprising a frameshift c.739delA (p.(Ser247Valfs*)) in exon 6 (Patient-1), a nonsense c.901C>T (p.(Gln301*)) in exon 7 (Patient-2 and affected mother), and a nonsense c.1081C>T (p.(Gln361*)) in exon 8 (Patient-3). Two previously reported variants were missense: the c.673C>T (p.(Arg225Trp)) (Patient-4) and c.674G>A (p.(Arg225Gln)) (Patient-5) in exon 5 within the Runt homology domain. Patient-1, Patient-2, and Patient-4 with permanent dentition had thirty, nineteen, and twenty unerupted teeth, respectively; whereas Patient-3 and Patient-5, with deciduous dentition, had normally developed teeth. All patients exhibited typical CCD features, but the following uncommon/unreported phenotypes were observed: left fourth ray brachymetatarsia (Patient-1), normal clavicles (Patient-2 and affected mother), phalangeal malformations (Patient-3), and normal primary dentition (Patient-3, Patient-5).

Conclusions: The study shows that exome sequencing is effective to detect mutation across ethnics. The two p.Arg225 variants confirm that the Runt homology domain is vital for RUNX2 function. Here, we report a new CCD feature, unilateral brachymetatarsia, and three novel truncating variants, expanding the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of RUNX2 , as well as show that the CCD patients can have normal deciduous teeth, but must be monitored for permanent teeth anomalies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1678-7757-2022-0028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9239300PMC
June 2022

Short-Term Risk Factors for Subtalar Arthrodesis After Primary Tibiotalar Arthrodesis.

J Foot Ankle Surg 2022 Apr 10. Epub 2022 Apr 10.

Massachusetts General Hospital and Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Newton, MA.

While adjacent joint arthritis is a recognized long-term downside of primary tibiotalar arthrodesis (TTA), few studies have identified risk factors for early subtalar arthrodesis (STA) after TTA. This study aims to identify the risk factors for STA within the first few years following TTA. All patients older than 18 years undergoing TTA between 2008 and 2016 were identified retrospectively. Demographic data and comorbidities were collected alongside prior operative procedures, postoperative complications, and subsequent STA. Pre-and postoperative Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis grade of the subtalar joint and postoperative radiographic alignment were obtained. A total of 240 patients who underwent primary TTA were included in this study with median follow up of 13.8 months. Twenty patients (8.3%) underwent STA after TTA due to symptomatic nonunion of TTA in 13 (65%), progression of symptomatic subtalar osteoarthritis (OA) in 4 (20%), and symptomatic nonunion of primary TTA combined progressively symptomatic subtalar OA in 2 (10%). Preoperative radiographic subtalar OA severity and postoperative radiographic alignment were not correlated with subsequent STA. Diabetes mellitus, Charcot arthropathy, neuropathy, alcohol use, substance use disorder, and psychiatric disease were significantly associated with having a subsequent STA. The most common postoperative contributing factor for subsequent STA following primary TTA was the salvage of symptomatic ankle nonunion rather than subtalar joint disease. Patients considering an ankle fusion should be counseled of the risk of subsequent STA, especially if they have risk factors that include diabetes, Charcot arthropathy, neuropathy, alcohol use, substance use disorder, or psychiatric disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2022.04.001DOI Listing
April 2022

Isolated injuries to the lateral ankle ligaments have no direct effect on syndesmotic stability.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2022 May 6. Epub 2022 May 6.

Foot and Ankle Research and Innovation Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Purpose: This study aim was to detect the impact of lateral ankle ligaments injury on syndesmotic laxity when evaluated arthroscopically in a cadaveric model. The null hypothesis was that lateral ankle ligament injury does not affect the stability of syndesmosis.

Methods: Sixteen fresh-frozen above-knee amputated cadaveric specimens were divided into two groups of eight specimens that underwent arthroscopic evaluation of the distal tibiofibular joint. In both the groups, the assessment was first done with all syndesmotic and ankle ligaments intact. Thereafter, Group 1 underwent sequential transection of the three lateral ankle ligaments first to identify the effects of lateral ligament injury: (1) anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), (2) calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), (3) posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), then followed by the syndesmotic ligaments, (4) AITFL, (5) Interosseous ligament (IOL), and (6) PITFL. Group 2 underwent sequential transection of the (1) AITFL, (2) ATFL, (3) CFL, (4) IOL, (5) PTFL, and (6) PITFL, which represent the most commonly injured pattern in ankle sprain. In all scenarios, four loading conditions were considered under 100 N of direct force: (1) unstressed, (2) a lateral fibular hook test, (3) anterior to posterior (AP) fibular translation test, and (4) posterior to anterior (PA) fibular translation test. Distal tibiofibular coronal plane diastasis at the anterior and posterior third of syndesmosis, as well as AP and PA sagittal plane translation, were arthroscopically measured.

Results: The distal tibiofibular joint remained stable after transection of all lateral ankle ligaments (ATFL, CFL, and PTFL) as well as the AITFL. However, after additional transection of the IOL, the syndesmosis became unstable in both the coronal and sagittal plane. Syndesmosis laxity in the coronal plane was also observed after transection of the ATFL, CFL, AITFL, and IOL. Subsequent transection of the PITFL precipitated syndesmosis laxity in the sagittal plane, as well.

Conclusions: The findings from the present study suggest that lateral ankle ligament injuries itself do not directly affect the stability of syndesmosis. However, if it combines with IOL injuries, even partial injuries cause syndesmotic laxity. As a clinical relevance, accurate diagnosis is the key for surgeons to determine syndesmosis fixation whether there is only AITFL injury or combined IOL injury in concomitant acute syndesmotic and lateral ligament injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-022-06985-6DOI Listing
May 2022

Lisfranc injury: Refined diagnostic methodology using weightbearing and non-weightbearing radiographs.

Injury 2022 Jun 19;53(6):2318-2325. Epub 2022 Feb 19.

Foot and Ankle Research and Innovation Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Foot & Ankle Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Boston, MA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: To compare diagnostic parameters for Lisfranc instability on WB and NWB radiographs and to assess the inter-observer reliability of a standardized diagnostic protocol.

Patients And Methods: Patients who had undergone surgical treatment for subtle, purely ligamentous Lisfranc injury with both WB and NWB post-injury, pre-surgery films (n = 26) were included in this multicentre, retrospective comparative study. Also included was a control group (n = 26) of patients with isolated fifth metatarsal avulsion fractures who similarly had both WB and NWB films. Multiple midfoot distance and alignment measurements were used to evaluate the Lisfranc joint on both WB and NWB views. To evaluate interobserver reliability, measurements were made by two independent observers across a cohort subset.

Results: When comparing the NWB views between groups, only C1M2 (medial cuneiform- second metatarsal) distance was found to be significantly larger (∆ = 1.35 mm, p <0.001) for Lisfranc injuries. Most notably, C2M2 (Intermediate cuneiform - second metatarsal) step off-caused by lateral translation of the second metatarsal base-was not significantly different (∆ = 0.39 mm, p = 0.101) between Lisfranc patients and controls. On WB views, Lisfranc patients had significantly larger changes to C1M2 distance and C2M2 step-off as compared to controls (∆ = 2.97 mm, p <0.001 and ∆ =  1.98 mm, p <0.001 respectively). M1M2 (first to second intermetatarsal) distance was not significantly different between patients and controls in WB films. Within the cohort of ligamentous Lisfranc patients, C1M2 distance and C2M2 step-off were significantly larger in WB when compared to NWB films (∆ =  1.77 mm, p <0.001 and ∆ =  1.58 mm, p <0.001 respectively). For these parameters, inter-observer reliability scores (ICC) of >0. 90 were found when interpreting WB radiographs and ICC's ranging between 0.61 and 0.80 were found when interpreting NWB radiographs.

Conclusion: Using WB imaging for diagnosing subtle Lisfranc instability reveals larger diastasis in the tarsometatarsal joint and has a higher interobserver reliability compared to NWB imaging. Clinical concern for subtle or occult Lisfranc instability in any patient should therefore trigger WB radiographic assessment since such injuries may be missed on NWB views.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2022.02.040DOI Listing
June 2022

Use of portable ultrasonography for the diagnosis of lateral ankle instability.

J Orthop Res 2022 Jan 5. Epub 2022 Jan 5.

Foot and Ankle Research and Innovation Lab (FARIL), Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Portable ultrasonography is increasingly used to evaluate ankle stability at the point of care. This study aims to determine the correlation of portable-ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic measurements of ankle laxity in a cadaveric ligament transection model of ankle ligament injury. We hypothesize that there is an association between portable-ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic measurements when performing stress evaluation of lateral ankle instability. Eight fresh-frozen below-knee amputated cadaveric specimens with intact proximal fibula underwent ultrasound and fluoroscopic evaluation of the ankle during anterior drawer and talar tilt testing. The assessment was first performed with all lateral ankle ligaments intact and thereafter with sequential transection of the anterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament, and posterior talofibular ligament. The anterior drawer test was performed with both 50N and 80N of force, and talar tilt test was performed with 1.7 Nm of torque. Correlations between (1) portable-ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic measurements and (2) sequential transection of lateral ankle ligaments were evaluated using Spearman's rank correlations. The same statistical test was used to investigate the correlation between the ultrasonographic and the fluoroscopic measurements. The inter- and intra-observer agreement was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient through a two-way mixed-effects model with absolute agreement. Portable-ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic measurements increased as additional ligaments of the lateral ankle were transected (Spearman's rank correlation ranged from 0.74 to 0.81, 0.74 to 0.81, p-values < 0.001). Strong positive correlations between ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic measurements were found during the lateral ankle stability evaluation using anterior drawer and talar tilt testing (Spearman's rank correlation ranged from 0.81 to 0.85, 0.81 to 0.85, p-values < 0.001). Inter-rater (0.99, 95% CI: 0.98-0.99) and intra-rater reliability (0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99) for the ultrasonographic measurements were substantial. In conclusion, there was a strong correlation found between ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic values measured during simulated anterior drawer and talar tilt test in a cadaveric ligament transection model. In this model, the portable-ultrasonographic measurement was found to be reliable for repeated measurements of the talar translation and the lateral clear space distance. Based on these data, ultrasonography is likely to become a valuable point of care diagnostic tool due to its ability to readily and dynamically evaluate suspected lateral ankle instability. Clinical Significance: The use of dynamic stress ultrasound to assess the anterior translation of the talus and the lateral clear space distance appears to be a reliable and repeatable technique to evaluate lateral ankle stability with a radiation-free, noninvasive, and low-cost manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.25256DOI Listing
January 2022

The stability of total talar prosthesis-How stable to dislocation? Cadaveric study.

J Orthop Res 2021 Dec 13. Epub 2021 Dec 13.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Japan.

The aim of this study was to characterize ankle stability of total talar prosthesis (TTP) and to determine the effect of implant sizes on stability as well as the resistance to TTP dislocation. Twelve below-knee cadaveric specimens were divided into two groups. Group 1 received a size matched implant and Group 2 received downsized implant by 5%. The stability assessment under fluoroscopy was performed for each cadaver in its native state. Following TTP insertion process, each then underwent evaluation of the TTP ankle stability. The stability of pre- and post-TTP was compared. (1) Anterior drawer distance. (2) Talar tilt angle under varus and valgus stress. (3) Subtalar tilt angle under varus stress was measured. Finally, the dislocation test was performed using the aforementioned testing conditions, then the stress force was slowly increased from 0 to 350 N, during which time it was observed on fluoroscopy all the time. Compared to pre TTP ankles, varus and anterior drawer stress showed significant instability (p < 0.001-0.031). Only anterior drawer stress in smaller sized implants showed significant instability when compared to identical sized implants (p = 0.008). No dislocation was seen under varus, valgus, and subtalar stress. However, anterior dislocation was observed in all cases of smaller size implant group (p = 0.045). TTP implant was stable under valgus and subtalar stress. However, clinicians should pay attention to anterior instability. Notably, downsized implants should be considered carefully to minimize the chance of anterior dislocation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.25237DOI Listing
December 2021

Medial Ankle Stability Evaluation With Dynamic Ultrasound: Establishing Natural Variations in the Healthy Cohort.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2021 Aug;29(16):703-713

From the Foot and Ankle Research and Innovation Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Saengsin, Hagemeijer, Chang, Lubberts, Waryasz, Guss, DiGiovanni), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (Saengsin), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (Chang), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Hagemeijer), the Foot & Ankle Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital (Lubberts, Waryasz, Guss, DiGiovanni), and Massachusetts General Hospital, Newton-Wellesley Hospital (Guss, DiGiovanni), Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Introduction: Destabilizing injuries to the deltoid ligament have relied on radiographic stress examination for diagnosis, with a focus on medial clear space (MCS) widening. Recently, studies have demonstrated the use of ultrasonography to assess deltoid ligament injury, but not the medial ankle stability. The purpose of this study was to assess the MCS via ultrasonography while weight-bearing and with a gravity stress test (GST) in the uninjured ankle as a means of establishing normative values for future comparison.

Methods: Twenty-six participants with no reported ankle injury in their premedical history were included. The MCS was examined using ultrasonography with the patient lying in a lateral decubitus position to replicate a GST with the ankle held in a neutral and plantarflexed position as well as while weight-bearing. The MCS was assessed in mm at the anteromedial and inferomedial aspect of the ankle joint.

Results: With weight-bearing, the average anterior MCS and inferior MCS were 3.6 and 3.3 mm, respectively. During the GST in neutral ankle position, the average anterior MCS was 4.1 mm, whereas the average inferior MCS was 4.0 mm. When measured during the GST in plantarflexed ankle position, the averages anterior MCS and inferior MCS increased to 4.4 mm. MCS values were notably higher with GST than with weight-bearing measurements (P < 0.001). MCS values were notably higher with the foot in a plantarflexed compared with a neutral position when doing GST (P < 0.001). No notable differences in MCS distance were found when comparing laterality (P > 0.05). Height had a notable effect on all MCS values (P < 0.05). Inter- and intra-rater reliabilities for ultrasonographic MCS measurements were all excellent (interclass correlation coefficient >0.75).

Discussion: Ultrasound can reliably measure the MCS of the ankle while doing dynamic stress manoeuvres. With the deltoid ligament intact, a GST increases MCS widening more than weight-bearing, and holding the ankle in plantarflexion while doing a gravity stress view, further increases this difference.

Levels Of Evidence: Diagnostic studies-investigating a diagnostic test: Level III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5435/JAAOS-D-20-00597DOI Listing
August 2021

Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Review of Our Biomechanical Evidence.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2021 Jan;29(1):3-16

From the Foot and Ankle Research and Innovation Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Chang, Saengsin), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Japan (Chang), the Foot & Ankle Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital (Morris, Guss, DiGiovanni), the Massachusetts General Hospital, Newton- Wellesley Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Morris, Guss, DiGiovanni), the Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (Saengsin), the Foot and Ankle Institute of Grenoble, Centre Ostéo Articulaire des Cèdres, Echirolles (Tourné), and the Sport's Medical Clinic of Bordeaux, Bordeaux-Mérignac, France (Guillo).

Definitive diagnosis and optimal surgical treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability remains controversial. This review distills available biomechanical evidence as it pertains to the clinical assessment, imaging work up, and surgical treatment of lateral ankle instability. Current data suggest that accurate assessment of ligament integrity during physical examination requires the ankle to ideally be held in 16° of plantar flexion when performing the anterior drawer test and 18° of dorsiflexion when performing the talar tilt test, respectively. Stress radiographs are limited by their low sensitivity, and MRI is limited by its static nature. Surgically, both arthroscopic and open repair techniques appear biomechanically equivalent in their ability to restore ankle stability, although sufficient evidence is still lacking for any particular procedure to be considered a superior construct. When performing reconstruction, grafts should be tensioned at 10 N and use of nonabsorbable augmentations lacking viscoelastic creep must factor in the potential for overtensioning. Anatomic lateral ligament surgery provides sufficient biomechanical strength to safely enable immediate postoperative weight bearing if lateral ankle stress is neutralized with a boot. Further research and comparative clinical trials will be necessary to define which of these ever-increasing procedural options actually optimizes patient outcome for chronic lateral ankle instability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5435/JAAOS-D-20-00145DOI Listing
January 2021

Natural History and Prognostic Factors of Cholangiocarcinoma With Spinal Metastasis: A 10-Year Single Center Study.

Clin Spine Surg 2018 04;31(3):E160-E165

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan.

Study Design: This is a retrospective analysis.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology, survival, and prognostic factors for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) with spinal metastasis.

Summary Of Background Data: CCA is an epithelial cell malignancy of the bile duct, and a frequent site for its metastasis is the spine. Many areas of Asia are endemic for CCAs. To date, there is limited data on the epidemiology, natural history, and prognostic factors of CCA with spinal metastasis, which is crucial for better management and treatment of the disease.

Materials And Methods: Patients diagnosed with CCA were recruited to our study, in order to identify cases with spinal metastasis. The survival rate was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses of tumor-specific and spinal metastatic factors were performed to identify the independent factors that affect survival.

Results: From 2006 to 2015, 4585 CCA patients were identified and 182 of these patients had spinal metastasis. The overall median survival of patients with spinal metastasis was 88 days. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen <5 ng/mL, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 <39 U/mL, albumin ≥3.5 g/L, and Frankel score D-E were found to be independent factors that resulted in better survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. CCA resection or spinal surgery did not prolong the survival of patients with spinal metastasis.

Conclusion: Spinal surgery should be considered for CCA patients with spinal metastasis, who have a favorable prognosis, and are likely to live long enough to benefit from surgery. The aim is to palliate the symptoms and not as much to improve the survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BSD.0000000000000625DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5895169PMC
April 2018

Ankle ligament reconstruction after wide resection of the osteosarcoma of the distal fibula: a case report.

BMC Res Notes 2017 Dec 28;10(1):769. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Road, Sriphum, Muang District, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Restoration of the lateral ankle after distal fibulectomy is a difficult reconstructive procedure. Many surgical techniques have been proposed. This report shows another fibular reconstructive option with promising outcome.

Case Presentation: We report the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with a solitary mass located in the lateral aspect of the ankle. The mass had grown rapidly for 2 months and caused increasing pain. Physical examination showed a 3.0 cm diameter tender, nonmobile hard mass in the lateral malleolus. Radiographs showed an osteolytic lesion involving the lateral cortex at the distal fibula. After incisional biopsy, pathologic examination found a well-differentiated intramedullary osteosarcoma. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin was provided for 3 months prior to definitive surgical treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging showed persistent tumor in the biopsy site. After distal fibulectomy and wide resection, split tibialis posterior tendon transfer to the remaining peroneus brevis restored the stability of the ankle. The pain resolved within 3 months. The ankle was stable and no recurrence of the cancer was found at a 7 year follow-up.

Conclusion: Reconstruction following distal fibulectomy and surrounding soft tissue resection responds favorably to split tibialis posterior transfer to the remaining peroneus brevis suggesting that this technique can provide a good and functional outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-017-3097-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808619PMC
December 2017

Spindle Cell Hemangioma of the Midfoot: A Case Report.

J Orthop Case Rep 2017 Sep-Oct;7(5):75-79

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Introduction: Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) of the bone (midfoot) is a rare disease, but it can cause symptomatic pain and invade surrounding tissues lead to limb deformities and functional loss.

Case Report: We report the case of a 35-year-old woman who experienced a firm mass over the left midfoot for 5 years causing pain and numbness in the foot. Radiographs showed a geographic osteolytic lesion involving calcification of the base of the 2nd and 3rd metatarsals, cuneiforms bones and surrounding soft tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lobulated mass in the midfoot containing tangles of tortuous blood vessels and dark foci characteristic of phleboliths. Wide resection of the 2nd and 3rd cuneiforms, metatarsal bones and surrounding tissues with a curved iliac bone graft reconstruction were performed. Histological assessment revealed a lesion composed of a vascular channel containing endothelial cells with smooth muscle but without cellular atypia. The definite diagnosis was spinal cell hemangioma. The pain resolved within 4 months. The foot was stable, and no recurrence was found at the 48 months follow-up.

Conclusion: This unusual disease, SCH of the midfoot responded favorably to wide resection and curved iliac bone grafting. It is suggested that this approach will provide a satisfactory functional result.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.13107/jocr.2250-0685.904DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5728006PMC
December 2017

Effectiveness of sonography assisted minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) compare with fluoroscope assisted in femoral shaft fracture: A cadaveric study.

Injury 2017 Aug 5;48(8):1758-1763. Epub 2017 Jul 5.

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkla, Thailand.

Introduction: A minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has an advantage of biological soft tissue preservation that consists of preserving bony blood supply, fracture hematoma and less soft tissue damage which leads to decreasing of infection rate and rapid bone healing. However, the radiation exposure is still a disadvantage of this technique. A sonography that provides dynamic real time imaging may be used as an alternative technique for assisting MIPO. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of MIPO in femoral shaft fracture between the sonography assisted and the fluoroscopy assisted.

Methods: Twenty-eight cadaveric limbs were subjected to create femoral shaft fracture. Then, sonography assisted reduction with temporary external fixation and MIPO were performed. Images of the sonography and the fluoroscopy were recorded including before reduction, after reduction and after MIPO in order to identify fracture displacements in anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. Moreover, the anterior and posterior distances from edge of the bone to the plate were measured to confirm plate position. The effectiveness of this technique was defined as the proper plate position and acceptable alignment after fixation. All distances from the sonography and the fluoroscopy were also analyzed and compared using Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman method to assess the agreements between two tests.

Result: All of the subjects were met the criteria for acceptable alignment. We found only three femoral shaft fracture (11%) operated with MIPO by sonography assisted that showed slipped plate off femoral bones. According to Pearson correlation, there were good to excellent agreements in term of measuring fracture displacement before (Pearson Correlation >0.7) and after reduction (Pearson Correlation >0.7) between these two tests. There was moderate agreement regarding to evaluation of plate position (Pearson Correlation 03.-0.7). When we compared two methods of measurement using Bland-Altman plot, there were no statistical significant difference (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Images from the sonography could provide visualization of the fracture during reduction and MIPO as accurately as the radiography. Thus, the sonography assisted MIPO in femoral shaft fracture can be done effectively comparing with radiographic assisted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2017.07.002DOI Listing
August 2017
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