Publications by authors named "Jing-Rui Chai"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Amygdala dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system modulates depressive-like behavior in mice following chronic social defeat stress.

Acta Pharmacol Sin 2021 May 25. Epub 2021 May 25.

Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.

Major depression disorder is a severe and recurrent neuropsychological disorder characterized by lowered mood and social activity and cognitive impairment. Owing to unclear molecular mechanisms of depression, limited interventions are available in clinic. In this study we investigated the role of dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in the development of depression. Mice were subjected to chronic social defeat stress for 14 days. Chronic social defeat stress induced significant social avoidance in mice characterized by decreased time duration in the interaction zone and increased time duration in the corner zone. Pre-administration of a κ opioid receptor antagonist norBNI (10 mg/kg, i.p.) could prevent the development of social avoidance induced by chronic social defeat stress. Social avoidance was not observed in κ opioid receptor knockout mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress. We further revealed that social defeat stress activated c-fos and ERK signaling in the amygdala without affecting the NAc, hippocampus and hypothalamus, and ERK activation was blocked by systemic injection of norBNI. Finally, the expression of dynorphin A, the endogenous ligand of κ opioid receptor, was significantly increased in the amygdala following social defeat stress; microinjection of norBNI into the amygdala prevented the development of depressive-like behaviors caused by social defeat stress. The present study demonstrates that upregulated dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in the amygdala leads to the emergence of depression following chronic social defeat stress, and sheds light on κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of depression following chronic stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41401-021-00677-6DOI Listing
May 2021

Alteration of twinfilin1 expression underlies opioid withdrawal-induced remodeling of actin cytoskeleton at synapses and formation of aversive memory.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.

Exposure to drugs of abuse induces alterations of dendritic spine morphology and density that has been proposed to be a cellular basis of long-lasting addictive memory and heavily depend on remodeling of its underlying actin cytoskeleton by the actin cytoskeleton regulators. However, the actin cytoskeleton regulators involved and the specific mechanisms whereby drugs of abuse alter their expression or function are largely unknown. Twinfilin (Twf1) is a highly conserved actin-depolymerizing factor that regulates actin dynamics in organisms from yeast to mammals. Despite abundant expression of Twf1 in mammalian brain, little is known about its importance for brain functions such as experience-dependent synaptic and behavioral plasticity. Here we show that conditioned morphine withdrawal (CMW)-induced synaptic structure and behavior plasticity depends on downregulation of Twf1 in the amygdala of rats. Genetically manipulating Twf1 expression in the amygdala bidirectionally regulates CMW-induced changes in actin polymerization, spine density and behavior. We further demonstrate that downregulation of Twf1 is due to upregulation of miR101a expression via a previously unrecognized mechanism involving CMW-induced increases in miR101a nuclear processing via phosphorylation of MeCP at Ser421. Our findings establish the importance of Twf1 in regulating opioid-induced synaptic and behavioral plasticity and demonstrate its value as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of opioid addiction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01111-3DOI Listing
May 2021

Anteromedial thalamic nucleus to anterior cingulate cortex inputs modulate histaminergic itch sensation.

Neuropharmacology 2020 05 6;168:108028. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201203, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Beijing, 100049, China; Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, 310053, China.

Itch is an unpleasant feeling that triggers scratching behavior. Much progress has been made in identifying the mechanism of itch at the peripheral and spinal levels, however, itch circuits in the brain remain largely unexplored. We previously found that anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to dorsal medial striatum (DMS) inputs modulated histamine-induced itch sensation, but how itch information was transmitted to ACC remained unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the anteromedial thalamic nucleus (AM) was activated during histaminergic itch, and there existed reciprocal neuronal projections between AM and ACC. Disconnection between AM and ACC resulted in a significant reduction of histaminergic, but not nonhistaminergic, itch-related scratching behavior. Optogenetic activation of AM-ACC, but not ACC-AM, projections evoked histaminergic itch sensation. Thus, our studies firstly reveal that AM is critical for histaminergic itch sensation and AM-ACC projections modulate histaminergic itch-induced scratching behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2020.108028DOI Listing
May 2020

Pharmacological Characterization of Dezocine, a Potent Analgesic Acting as a κ Partial Agonist and μ Partial Agonist.

Sci Rep 2018 09 20;8(1):14087. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai, 201203, China.

Dezocine is becoming dominated in China market for relieving moderate to severe pain. It is believed that Dezocine's clinical efficacy and little chance to provoke adverse events during the therapeutic process are mainly attributed to its partial agonist activity at the μ opioid receptor. In the present work, we comprehensively studied the pharmacological characterization of Dezocine and identified that the analgesic effect of Dezocine was a result of action at both the κ and μ opioid receptors. We firstly found that Dezocine displayed preferential binding to μ opioid receptor over κ and δ opioid receptors. Dezocine, on its own, weakly stimulated G protein activation in cells expressing κ and μ receptors, but in the presence of full κ agonist U50,488 H and μ agonist DAMGO, Dezocine inhibited U50,488H- and DAMGO-mediated G protein activation, indicating that Dezocine was a κ partial agonist and μ partial agonist. Then the in intro results were verified by in vivo studies in mice. We observed that Dezocine-produced antinociception was significantly inhibited by κ antagonist nor-BNI and μ antagonist β-FNA pretreatment, indicating that Dezocine-mediated antinociception was via both the κ and μ opioid receptors. When co-administrating of Dezocine with U50,488 H or morphine, Dezocine was capable of inhibiting U50,488H- or morphine-induced antinociception. Finally, κ receptor activation-associated side effect sedation was investigated. We found that Dezocine displayed limited sedative effect with a ceiling effecting at a moderate dose. Thus, our work led to a better understanding of the analgesic mechanism of action of Dezocine in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32568-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6148296PMC
September 2018

Dissociative role for dorsal hippocampus in mediating heroin self-administration and relapse through CDK5 and RhoB signaling revealed by proteomic analysis.

Addict Biol 2017 Nov 22;22(6):1731-1742. Epub 2016 Aug 22.

Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.

Addiction is characterized by drug craving, compulsive drug taking and relapse, which is attributed to aberrant neuroadaptation in brain regions implicated in drug addiction, induced by changes in gene and protein expression in these regions after chronic drug exposure. Accumulating evidence suggests that the dorsal hippocampus (DH) plays an important role in mediating drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior and relapse. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects of the DH are unclear. In the present study, we employed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to analyze the proteins altered in the DH of heroin self-administering rats. A total of 4015 proteins were quantified with high confidence, and 361 proteins showed significant differences compared with the saline control group. Among them, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and ras homolog family member B (RhoB) were up-regulated in rats with a history of extended access to heroin. Functionally, inhibition of CDK5 in the DH enhanced heroin self-administration, indicating that CDK5 signaling in the DH acts as a homeostatic compensatory mechanism to limit heroin-taking behavior, whereas blockade of the Rho-Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway attenuated context-induced heroin relapse, indicating that RhoB signaling in the DH is required for the retrieval (recall) of addiction memory. Our findings suggest that manipulation of CDK5 signaling in the DH may be essential in determining vulnerability to opiate taking, whereas manipulation of RhoB signaling in the DH may be essential in determining vulnerability to relapse. Overall, the present study suggests that the DH can exert dissociative effects on heroin addiction through CDK5 and RhoB signaling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12435DOI Listing
November 2017

Pharmacological characterization and therapeutic potential for the treatment of opioid abuse with ATPM-ET, an N-ethyl substituted aminothiazolomorphinan with κ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist activity.

Eur J Pharmacol 2014 Oct 3;740:455-63. Epub 2014 Jul 3.

State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China. Electronic address:

We previously reported that the κ agonists with mixed μ activity could attenuate heroin self-administration with less potential to develop tolerance. The present study further investigated the effects of (-)-3-N-Ethylamino-thiazolo[5,4-b]-N-cyclopropylmethylmorphinan hydrochloride (ATPM-ET), a κ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist, on the acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), heroin self-administration and heroin-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. We found that ATPM-ET produced a longer duration of potent antinociceptive effects with less side effect of sedation. More importantly, ATPM-ET attenuated the acquisition of morphine-induced CPP, without affecting the reinstatement of morphine CPP. Furthermore, ATPM-ET significantly inhibited heroin self-administration and the reinstatement of heroin primed drug-seeking behavior. Taken together, ATPM-ET, a novel κ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist may have utility for the treatment of drug dependence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2014.06.045DOI Listing
October 2014