Publications by authors named "Jing-Hua Piao"

5 Publications

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CD44 is required for the migration of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to focal inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord.

Glia 2013 Mar 22;61(3):361-7. Epub 2012 Dec 22.

Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.

Remyelination of chronically demyelinated axons in multiple sclerosis (MS) requires the recruitment of endogenous cells or their replacement by transplanted, exogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). We have previously shown that an OPC line, CG4, preferentially migrates after transplantation toward focal areas of inflammatory demyelination and axon loss created by injection of zymosan in the rat spinal cord. Here we show that many transplanted CG4 cells had already migrated into the inflammatory lesion after 1 day. We demonstrate that a large number of CG4 cells that had migrated, expressed the adhesion protein, CD44, and that CD44's main ligand, hyaluronic acid (HA) was robustly expressed in the inflammatory lesion. In an in vitro migration assay, migration declined significantly following blocking of CD44 expression on CG4 cells. Likewise, migration of CG4 cells toward a zymosan lesion in vivo was inhibited when transplanted cells were exposed to a CD44 blocking antibody prior to transplantation. These findings suggest that CD44 is a key molecule in the migration of OPCs toward the focal inflammatory demyelinated lesion induced by zymosan, and may be an important in OPC repair in MS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/glia.22438DOI Listing
March 2013

Migration and remyelination by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells transplanted adjacent to focal areas of spinal cord inflammation.

J Neurosci Res 2011 Nov 25;89(11):1737-46. Epub 2011 Jul 25.

Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Exogenous cell replacement in MS lesions has been proposed as a means of achieving remyelination when endogenous remyelination has failed. However, the ability of exogenous cells to remyelinate axons in the presence of inflammation remains uncertain. We have explored the remyelinating capacity of an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG-4 transduced with the GFP gene and transplanted adjacent to a zymosan-induced focal demyelination model in the rat spinal cord. The resulting zymosan-induced lesions were characterized by persistent macrophage/microglia activation, focal demyelination, degeneration of axons, and reactive astrogliosis. GFP(+) CG-4 cells were found to migrate preferentially toward the inflammatory lesion and survive inside the lesion. A proportion of GFP(+) CG-4 cells differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes and remyelinated axons within the lesion. These findings suggest that grafted oligodendrocyte progenitors may migrate toward areas of inflammation in the adult rat spinal cord, where they can survive and differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.22716DOI Listing
November 2011

Long-term culture and neuronal survival after intraspinal transplantation of human spinal cord-derived neurospheres.

Physiol Behav 2007 Sep 25;92(1-2):60-6. Epub 2007 May 25.

Karolinska Institutet, Division of Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Novum, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.

There is heterogeneity in neural stem and progenitor cell characteristics depending on their species and regional origin. In search for potent in vitro-expanded human neural precursor cells and cell therapy methods to repair the injured human spinal cord, the possible influence exerted by intrinsic cellular heterogeneity has to be considered. Data available on in vitro-expanded human spinal cord-derived cells are sparse and it has previously been difficult to establish long-term neurosphere cultures showing multipotentiality. In the present paper, human spinal cord-derived neurospheres were cultured in the presence of EGF, bFGF and CNTF for up to 25 passages (>350 days) in vitro. In contrast to the human first trimester subcortical forebrain, spinal cord tissue>9.5 weeks of gestation could not serve as a source for long-term neurosphere cultures under the present conditions. After withdrawal of mitogens, cultured neurospheres (at 18 passages) gave rise to cells with neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendrocytic phenotypes in vitro. After transplantation of human spinal cord-derived neurospheres to the lesioned spinal cord of immuno-deficient adult rats, large numbers of cells survived at least up to 6 weeks, expressing neuronal and astrocytic phenotypes. These results demonstrate that it is possible to expand and maintain multipotent human spinal cord-derived neurospheres in vitro for extended time-periods and that they have promising in vivo potential after engraftment to the injured spinal cord.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2007.05.056DOI Listing
September 2007

Cellular composition of long-term human spinal cord- and forebrain-derived neurosphere cultures.

J Neurosci Res 2006 Aug;84(3):471-82

Neurotec Department, Division of Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

In vitro expanded neural precursor cells (NPCs) may provide a stable source for cell therapy. In search of the optimal cell source for spinal cord repair, we investigated influences of gestational age, regional heterogeneity, and long-term in vitro propagation. The cellular content of neurosphere cultures prior to and after in vitro differentiation was studied by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Human forebrain and spinal cord NPCs deriving from first-trimester tissue were cultured as neurospheres in the presence of epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and ciliary neurotrophic factor. Proteins characteristic for embryonic stem cells, i.e., Tra-1-60, Tra-1-81, and SSEA-4, were present in approximately 0.5% of the cells in donor tissues and neurospheres. The proportions of nestin- and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-immunoreactive (IR) cells were also maintained, whereas the CD133-IR population increased in vitro. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-IR cells increased in number, and in contrast the fraction of beta-tubulin III-IR cells decreased, at and beyond passage 5 in spinal cord but not forebrain cultures. However, dissociated and in vitro-differentiated forebrain- and spinal cord-derived neurospheres generated similar proportions of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Gestational age of the donor tissue, which ranged from 4.5 to 12 weeks for forebrain and from 4.5 to 9.5 weeks for spinal cord, did not affect the proportion of cells with different phenotypes in culture. Thus, cellular composition of human neurosphere cultures differs as a result of long-term in vitro propagation and regional heterogeneity of source tissue, despite expansion under equal culture conditions. This could in turn imply that human spinal cord and forebrain NPCs present different repair potentials in in vivo settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.20955DOI Listing
August 2006

Low immunogenicity of in vitro-expanded human neural cells despite high MHC expression.

J Neuroimmunol 2005 Apr;161(1-2):1-11

Neurotec Department, Division of Experimental Geriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, KFC, 4th floor, Novum, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.

The ability to expand human neural precursor cells in vitro offers new possibilities for future cell therapies. However, concern over immunologically based rejection of in vitro-expanded human neural cells confounds their use as donor cells. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, but not the co-stimulatory proteins CD40, CD80 and CD86, substantially increase during expansion of neurospheres. Furthermore, peripheral lymphocytes were unresponsive when co-cultured with in vitro-expanded neural cells. Taken together, these results suggest a low immunogenicity of these cultured human neural cells despite HLA incompatibility and high HLA expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroim.2004.11.016DOI Listing
April 2005