Publications by authors named "Jin Ho Choo"

7 Publications

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Molecular characterization of Hsf1 as a master regulator of heat shock response in the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Ogataea parapolymorpha.

J Microbiol 2021 Feb 1;59(2):151-163. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, Republic of Korea.

Ogataea parapolymorpha (Hansenula polymorpha DL-1) is a thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast with biotechnological applications. Here, O. parapolymorpha genes whose expression is induced in response to heat shock were identified by transcriptome analysis and shown to possess heat shock elements (HSEs) in their promoters. The function of O. parapolymorpha HSF1 encoding a putative heat shock transcription factor 1 (OpHsf1) was characterized in the context of heat stress response. Despite exhibiting low sequence identity (26%) to its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog, OpHsf1 harbors conserved domains including a DNA binding domain (DBD), domains involved in trimerization (TRI), transcriptional activation (AR1, AR2), transcriptional repression (CE2), and a C-terminal modulator (CTM) domain. OpHSF1 could complement the temperature sensitive (Ts) phenotype of a S. cerevisiae hsf1 mutant. An O. parapolymorpha strain with an H221R mutation in the DBD domain of OpHsf1 exhibited significantly retarded growth and a Ts phenotype. Intriguingly, the expression of heat-shock-protein-coding genes harboring HSEs was significantly decreased in the H221R mutant strain, even under non-stress conditions, indicating the importance of the DBD for the basal growth of O. parapolymorpha. Notably, even though the deletion of C-terminal domains (ΔCE2, ΔAR2, ΔCTM) of OpHsf1 destroyed complementation of the growth defect of the S. cerevisiae hsf1 strain, the C-terminal domains were shown to be dispensable in O. parapolymorpha. Overexpression of OpHsf1 in S. cerevisiae increased resistance to transient heat shock, supporting the idea that OpHsf1 could be useful in the development of heat-shock-resistant yeast host strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-021-0646-2DOI Listing
February 2021

Development of conditional cell lysis mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as production hosts by modulating OCH1 and CHS3 expression.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2019 Mar 31;103(5):2277-2293. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, South Korea.

The traditional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used as a host for the production of recombinant proteins and metabolites with industrial potential. However, its thick and rigid cell wall presents problems for the effective recovery of products. In this study, we modulated the expression of ScOCH1, encoding the α-1,6-mannosyltransferase responsible for outer chain biosynthesis of N-glycans, and ScCHS3, encoding the chitin synthase III required for synthesis of the majority of cell wall chitin, by exploiting the repressible ScMET3 promoter. The conditional single mutants P-OCH1 and P-CHS3 and the double mutant P-OCH1/P-CHS3 showed comparable growth to the wild-type strain under normal conditions but exhibited increased sensitivity to temperature and cell wall-disturbing agents in the presence of methionine. Such conditional growth defects were fully recovered by supplementation with 1 M sorbitol. The osmotic lysis of the conditional mutants cultivated with methionine was sufficient to release the intracellularly expressed recombinant protein, nodavirus capsid protein, with up to 60% efficiency, compared to lysis by glass bead breakage. These mutant strains also showed approximately three-fold-enhanced secretion of a recombinant extracellular glycoprotein, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera β-glucosidase, with markedly reduced hypermannosylation, particularly in the P-OCH1 mutants. Furthermore, a substantial increase of extracellular glutathione production, up to four-fold, was achieved with the conditional mutant yeast cells. Together, our data support that the conditional cell wall lysis mutants constructed based on the modulation of ScOCH1 and ScCHS3 expression would likely be useful hosts for the improved recovery of proteins and metabolites with industrial application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-019-09614-4DOI Listing
March 2019

Molecular and functional characterization of two pyruvate decarboxylase genes, PDC1 and PDC5, in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2018 Apr 1;102(8):3723-3737. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 156-756, Republic of Korea.

Pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) is a cytosolic enzyme located at the branch point between fermentative and respiratory sugar catabolism. Here, we identified and functionally characterized KmPDC1 and KmPDC5 encoding two homologs of Pdc in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus KCTC 17555. Despite the conservation of important Pdc domains, a few amino acid sequences essential for enzymatic activity are not conserved in KmPdc5p. Deletion of KmPDC1 alone eliminated most of Pdc activity, but the growth of the Kmpdc1Δ strain on glucose was comparable to that of the wild type (WT) strain under aerobic conditions. In contrast to the WT, Kmpdc1Δ could not grow on glucose under oxygen-limited conditions. The KmPDC5 deletion did not generate any apparent change in Pdc activity or growth patterns under several tested conditions. Whereas the expression of KmPDC1 was enhanced by glucose, the basic expression levels of KmPDC5 were very low, without a detectable difference between glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources. Moreover, KmPDC5 overexpression was unable to complement the growth defect of Kmpdc1Δ in the presence of antimycin A, and the purified recombinant KmPdc5p was inactive in Pdc activity assay, supporting the notion that KmPdc5p may lack Pdc enzymatic activity. Notably, compared to the WT, Kmpdc1Δ single and Kmpdc1Δpdc5Δ double mutants produced significantly less glycerol, acetate, and ethanol while accumulating pyruvate. Altogether, our data indicate that a single deletion of KmPDC1 is sufficient in Crabtree-negative K. marxianus strains to generate a starting host strain for engineering of production of high-value biomaterials derived from pyruvate without byproduct formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-018-8862-3DOI Listing
April 2018

Functional analysis of Mpk1-mediated cell wall integrity signaling pathway in the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

J Microbiol 2018 Jan 4;56(1):72-82. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, Republic of Korea.

Understanding the characteristics and regulation mechanisms of cell wall integrity (CWI) in yeast is important not only for basic research but also in biotechnological applications. We found significantly different CWIs in two representative strains of the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha. Compared to the A16 strain (classified as Ogataea polymorpha), the DL1-L strain (classified as Ogataea parapolymorpha) has a thinner cell wall that was found to be more fragile following long-term cultivation and more sensitive to zymolyase. To gain a deeper insight into this difference, we compared the characteristics of the Mpk1pmediated CWI signaling pathway in the two strains. While a DL1-L mutant deficient in Mpk1p (mpk1Δ) showed severe growth retardation at both normal and high growth temperatures and in the presence of cell-wall disrupting agents, the A16 mpk1Δ mutant displayed only a mild defect in cell growth. Sorbitol effect on rescuing growth retardation was different in the two mpk1Δ strains, which could partly be ascribed to subtle differences in the activation of HOG pathway. Among the cell wall disruptors evaluated, only caffeine clearly increased phosphorylation of Mpk1p in DL1-L, but not in A16. A transcriptome analysis of the DL1-L strain revealed that caffeine significantly increased the expression of a subset of cell-wall related genes in an Mpk1p-dependent manner, but not the expected Rlm1-target genes. Taken together, our data support an essential role for Mpk1p in maintaining CWI in H. polymorpha, although the requirement for Mpk1p and its regulation under diverse stress conditions varies depending on the strain background.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-018-7508-6DOI Listing
January 2018

Whole-genome de novo sequencing, combined with RNA-Seq analysis, reveals unique genome and physiological features of the amylolytic yeast and its interspecies hybrid.

Biotechnol Biofuels 2016 11;9:246. Epub 2016 Nov 11.

Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974 South Korea.

Background: Genomic studies on fungal species with hydrolytic activity have gained increased attention due to their great biotechnological potential for biomass-based biofuel production. The amylolytic yeast has served as a good source of enzymes and genes involved in saccharification. Despite its long history of use in food fermentation and bioethanol production, very little is known about the basic physiology and genomic features of .

Results: We performed whole-genome (WG) de novo sequencing and complete assembly of KJJ81 and KPH12, two isolates from wheat-based in Korea. Intriguingly, the KJJ81 genome (~38 Mb) was revealed as a hybrid between the KPH12 genome (~18 Mb) and another unidentified genome sharing 88.1% nucleotide identity with the KPH12 genome. The seven chromosome pairs of KJJ81 subgenomes exhibit highly conserved synteny, indicating a very recent hybridization event. The phylogeny inferred from WG comparisons showed an early divergence of before the separation of the CTG and clades in the subphylum . Reconstructed carbon and sulfur metabolic pathways, coupled with RNA-Seq analysis, suggested a marginal Crabtree effect under high glucose and activation of sulfur metabolism toward methionine biosynthesis under sulfur limitation in this yeast. Notably, the lack of sulfate assimilation genes in the genome reflects a unique phenotype for clades as natural sulfur auxotrophs. Extended gene families, including novel genes involved in saccharification and proteolysis, were identified. Moreover, comparative genome analysis of ATCC 36309, an isolate from chalky rye bread in Germany, revealed that an interchromosomal translocation occurred in the KPH12 genome before the generation of the KJJ81 hybrid genome.

Conclusions: The completely sequenced genome with high-quality annotation and RNA-Seq analysis establishes an important foundation for functional inference of in the degradation of fermentation mash. The gene inventory facilitates the discovery of new genes applicable to the production of novel valuable enzymes and chemicals. Moreover, as the first gapless genome assembly in the genus including members with desirable traits for bioconversion, the unique genomic features of and its hybrid will provide in-depth insights into fungal genome dynamics as evolutionary adaptation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13068-016-0653-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5106798PMC
November 2016

Characterization of putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchoring motifs for surface display in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

Biotechnol Lett 2014 Oct 15;36(10):2085-94. Epub 2014 Jun 15.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 156-756, Korea.

Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha revealed 39 putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-proteins). Notably, dibasic motifs in the proximal ω-site, that has been reported as a plasma membrane retention signal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPI-proteins, were not found in any of the predicted GPI-proteins of H. polymorpha. To evaluate the in silico prediction, C-terminal peptides of 40 amino acids derived from ten H. polymorpha GPI-proteins were fused to the Aspergillus saitoi α-1,2-mannosidase (msdS). Cell wall fraction analysis showed that nine of the ten msdS-GPI fusion proteins were mostly localized at the cell wall. Surface expression of functional msdS was further confirmed by in vitro enzyme activity assay and by glycan structure analysis of cell wall mannoproteins. The recombinant H. polymorpha strains expressing surface-displayed msdS have the potential as useful hosts to produce glycoproteins with decreased mannosylation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-014-1582-6DOI Listing
October 2014

Deletion of a KU80 homolog enhances homologous recombination in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

Biotechnol Lett 2014 Oct 15;36(10):2059-67. Epub 2014 Jun 15.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 156-756, Korea.

Targeted gene replacement in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus KCTC 17555 has been hampered by its propensity to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). To enhance homologous recombination (HR) by blocking NHEJ, we identified and disrupted the K. marxianus KU80 gene. The ku80 deletion mutant strain (Kmku80∆) of K. marxianus KCTC 17555 did not show apparent growth defects under several conditions with the exception of exposure to tunicamycin. The targeted disruption of the three model genes, KmLEU2, KmPDC1, and KmPDC5, was increased by 13-70 % in Kmku80∆, although the efficiency was greatly affected by the length of the homologous flanking fragments. In contrast, the double HR frequency was 0-13.7 % in the wild-type strain even with flanking fragments 1 kb long. Therefore, Kmku80∆ promises to be a useful recipient strain for targeted gene manipulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-014-1576-4DOI Listing
October 2014