Publications by authors named "Jim Vaught"

51 Publications

The Continuing Saga of Cell Line Misidentification.

Biopreserv Biobank 2021 Oct 11;19(5):357-358. Epub 2021 Oct 11.

Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2021.29094.jjvDOI Listing
October 2021

Mid-Year Update.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2020 08 17;18(4):257. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2020.29073.jjvDOI Listing
August 2020

Biobanking During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2020 06 15;18(3):153-154. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2020.29069.jjvDOI Listing
June 2020

Upcoming Special Sections.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2019 Oct 3;17(5):377. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2019.29059.jjvDOI Listing
October 2019

Climate Change, Biodiversity, and Biopreservation.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2019 Aug;17(4):273

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2019.29057.jjvDOI Listing
August 2019

Biobanking and Beyond: The Importance of Scientific Collections.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2019;17(1)

1 Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2019.29048.jjvDOI Listing
June 2019

Critical Financial Challenges for Biobanking: Report of a National Cancer Institute Study.

Biopreserv Biobank 2019 Apr 14;17(2):129-138. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

1 Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Background: Researchers and other key stakeholders in biobanking often do not have a thorough understanding of the true costs and challenges associated with initiating, running, and maintaining a biobank. The National Cancer Institute's Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) commissioned the Biobanking Financial Sustainability survey to better understand the challenges that biobanks face in supporting ongoing operations. A series of interviews with biobanking managers and an international focus group session informed the content of the survey.

Methods: The design of the survey included five main sections, each containing questions related to primary topics as follows: general demographics, operations, funding sources, costs, and financial challenges. While the survey focused on financial issues and challenges, it also explored staffing and strategic planning as these issues relate to the sustainability of operations and financial support. U.S. and international biobanks were included in the survey.

Results: Biobanks in general are dependent on public funding and most biobanks do not have formal plans for the long-term stewardship of their collections. Respondents are working at a critical level of personnel and are not in a position to further reduce staffing. Smaller biobanks in particular need assistance in defining reasonable cost recovery user fees for biospecimens and related services.

Conclusions: The survey results highlight several issues that are important for long-term biobank sustainability. It is critical to prepare for such issues as effective biobanking practices have increasingly been recognized as a key component for the advancement of precision medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2018.0069DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6479261PMC
April 2019

Update on Journal and ISBER Activities in China.

Biopreserv Biobank 2018 Jun 11;16(3):169-170. Epub 2018 May 11.

Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2018.29039.jjvDOI Listing
June 2018

Cryobiology Meets Biobanking in Hefei, China.

Biopreserv Biobank 2017 Oct 28;15(5):403. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

4 Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2017.29028.djgDOI Listing
October 2017

Assessment of knowledge about biobanking among healthcare students and their willingness to donate biospecimens.

BMC Med Ethics 2017 May 2;18(1):32. Epub 2017 May 2.

Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80216, Jeddah, 21589, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Biobanks and biospecimen collections are becoming a primary means of delivering personalized diagnostics and tailoring individualized therapeutics. This shift towards precision medicine (PM) requires interactions among a variety of stakeholders, including the public, patients, healthcare providers, government, and donors. Very few studies have investigated the role of healthcare students in biobanking and biospecimen donations. The main aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the knowledge of senior healthcare students about biobanks and (2) to assess the students' willingness to donate biospecimens and the factors influencing their attitudes.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among senior healthcare students at King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabia. The data were obtained using a self-administered questionnaire in English. In addition to the respondents' biographical data section, the questionnaire assessed the respondents' general knowledge about biobanking, the factors influencing their willingness to donate biospecimens to biobanks and their general attitudes towards biomedical research.

Results: A total of 597 senior healthcare students were included in the study. The general knowledge score was 3.2 (±1.6) out of 7. Only approximately 44% and 27% of students were aware of the terms "Human Genome Project" (HGP) and "biobank," respectively. The majority of the students (89%) were willing to donate biospecimens to biobanks. Multiple factors were significantly associated with their willingness to donate, including their perceived general health (p < 0.001), past experience with both tissue testing (p < 0.04) and tissue donation (p < 0.001), biobanking knowledge score (p < 0.001) and biomedical research attitude score (p < 0.001). The main reasons for students' willingness to donate were advancement of medical research and societal benefits, whereas misuse of biospecimens and confidentiality breaches were the main reasons for a reluctance to donate.

Conclusion: Despite their strong willingness to donate biospecimens, students exhibited a notable lack of knowledge about biobanking and the HGP. To expedite the transition towards PM, it is highly recommended to enhance healthcare curricula by including more educational and awareness programmes to familiarize students with OMICs technologies in addition to the scope of research and clinical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12910-017-0195-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5414189PMC
May 2017

Our 15 Anniversary Issue.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2017 Apr 27;15(2):83. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2017.29020.jjvDOI Listing
April 2017

2017 ISBER Award Winners.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2017 Feb 30;15(1):80-81. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2017.29016.jjvDOI Listing
February 2017

Coming in 2017: Our 15th Anniversary!

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Dec 21;14(6):455. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.29015.jjvDOI Listing
December 2016

Biobanking and Biosecurity Initiatives in Africa.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Oct 13;14(5):355-356. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.29009.jjvDOI Listing
October 2016

Biopreservation and Biobanking Mid-Year Report.

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Aug;14(4):263

2 Editorial Coordinator, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.29008.jjvDOI Listing
August 2016

ISBER Regional Meeting in Bethesda, Maryland.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Aug 25;14(4):353-4. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.29007.jjvDOI Listing
August 2016

Building a Biobank.

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Apr 14;14(2):87-8. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

3 Editor-in-Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.29005.jjvDOI Listing
April 2016

The International Scene in 2016: Biopreservation and Biobanking and ISBER.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Feb 26;14(1). Epub 2016 Jan 26.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.29000.jjvDOI Listing
February 2016

The Biobank Economic Modeling Tool (BEMT): Online Financial Planning to Facilitate Biobank Sustainability.

Biopreserv Biobank 2015 Dec;13(6):421-9

1 National Cancer Institute , Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB), Bethesda, Maryland.

Background: Biospecimens are essential resources for advancing basic and translational research. However, there are little data available regarding the costs associated with operating a biobank, and few resources to enable their long-term sustainability. To support the research community in this effort, the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute's Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch has developed the Biobank Economic Modeling Tool (BEMT). The tool is accessible at http://biospecimens.cancer.gov/resources/bemt.asp.

Methods: To obtain market-based cost information and to inform the development of the tool, a survey was designed and sent to 423 biobank managers and directors across the world. The survey contained questions regarding infrastructure investments, salary costs, funding options, types of biospecimen resources and services offered, as well as biospecimen pricing and service-related costs.

Results: A total of 106 responses were received. The data were anonymized, aggregated, and used to create a comprehensive database of cost and pricing information that was integrated into the web-based tool, the BEMT. The BEMT was built to allow the user to input cost and pricing data through a seven-step process to build a cost profile for their biobank, define direct and indirect costs, determine cost recovery fees, perform financial forecasting, and query the anonymized survey data from comparable biobanks.

Conclusion: A survey was conducted to obtain a greater understanding of the costs involved in operating a biobank. The anonymized survey data was then used to develop the BEMT, a cost modeling tool for biobanks. Users of the tool will be able to create a cost profile for their biobanks' specimens, products and services, establish pricing, and allocate costs for biospecimens based on percent cost recovered, and perform project-specific cost analyses and financial forecasting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2015.0089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4696440PMC
December 2015

Biobanking Comes of Age: The Transition to Biospecimen Science.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 2016 22;56:211-28. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1B3, Canada.

Biobanking involves the collection, processing, storage, and distribution of biological specimens and the policies and procedures necessary to accomplish those aims successfully. Although biobanking may also involve collections for environmental studies or museum archives, most efforts to standardize biobanking practices have been directed toward human biomedical research. Initially focused primarily on collecting samples for diagnostic purposes in pathology settings, biobanks have evolved into complex organizations engaged in advancing personalized (or precision) medicine and translational research. This evolution has involved the development of biobanking best practices and the transformation of a field driven by empirical approaches into the emerging area of biospecimen science. It has become increasingly important to develop evidence-based practices for collecting biospecimens and data that can be shared with confidence with international collaborators. Aside from these technical approaches, other factors play crucial roles, such as ethical and regulatory issues, business planning and sustainability, and approaches to data collection and sharing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-010715-103246DOI Listing
September 2016

Recent International Activities.

Biopreserv Biobank 2015 Oct;13(5):382-3

2 ISBER Past President 2015-2016.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2015.29033.jvDOI Listing
October 2015

A Novel Approach to High-Quality Postmortem Tissue Procurement: The GTEx Project.

Biopreserv Biobank 2015 Oct;13(5):311-9

1 Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch, Cancer Diagnosis Program, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) , Bethesda, Maryland.

The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, sponsored by the NIH Common Fund, was established to study the correlation between human genetic variation and tissue-specific gene expression in non-diseased individuals. A significant challenge was the collection of high-quality biospecimens for extensive genomic analyses. Here we describe how a successful infrastructure for biospecimen procurement was developed and implemented by multiple research partners to support the prospective collection, annotation, and distribution of blood, tissues, and cell lines for the GTEx project. Other research projects can follow this model and form beneficial partnerships with rapid autopsy and organ procurement organizations to collect high quality biospecimens and associated clinical data for genomic studies. Biospecimens, clinical and genomic data, and Standard Operating Procedures guiding biospecimen collection for the GTEx project are available to the research community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2015.0032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4675181PMC
October 2015

2014 review, 2015 preview.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2015 Jun;13(3):151

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2015.29003.jvDOI Listing
June 2015

Preanalytical variables affecting the integrity of human biospecimens in biobanking.

Clin Chem 2015 Jul 15;61(7):914-34. Epub 2015 May 15.

International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, Vancouver, Canada; Editor-in-Chief, Biopreservation and Biobanking, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: Most errors in a clinical chemistry laboratory are due to preanalytical errors. Preanalytical variability of biospecimens can have significant effects on downstream analyses, and controlling such variables is therefore fundamental for the future use of biospecimens in personalized medicine for diagnostic or prognostic purposes.

Content: The focus of this review is to examine the preanalytical variables that affect human biospecimen integrity in biobanking, with a special focus on blood, saliva, and urine. Cost efficiency is discussed in relation to these issues.

Summary: The quality of a study will depend on the integrity of the biospecimens. Preanalytical preparations should be planned with consideration of the effect on downstream analyses. Currently such preanalytical variables are not routinely documented in the biospecimen research literature. Future studies using biobanked biospecimens should describe in detail the preanalytical handling of biospecimens and analyze and interpret the results with regard to the effects of these variables.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2014.228783DOI Listing
July 2015

Developments in biospecimen research.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Br Med Bull 2015 Jun 24;114(1):29-38. Epub 2015 Apr 24.

International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, Kensington, MD, USA

Introduction: Biobanking refers to the infrastructure, policies and practices involved in collecting, processing, storing and disseminating biological samples. Biospecimen methods research to support biobanking through evidence-based practices is now recognized as critical to the success of biobanking and translational research.

Sources Of Data: Data concerning biospecimen research have appeared in the literature for many years, primarily in journals and textbooks focused on clinical chemistry, epidemiology and pathology. Recently, new efforts have been initiated to support the development of evidence-based biobanking practices.

Areas Of Agreement: Generally, researchers who are engaged in studies involving biospecimen collection are aware of the effects of pre-analytical variables on their downstream analyses, and they normally take steps to control those variables to publish reproducible results. Knowledge of such biospecimen research data is often unknown in the clinical setting unless the researchers are engaged in a project requiring strict protocols.

Areas Of Controversy: There is broad agreement of the need to develop evidence-based practices to achieve consistent quality for biospecimens and data. However, due to inconsistencies in the literature, there is some disagreement on whether biospecimens need to be collected according to a 'platinum' standard or local biobank standards for collecting samples as 'fit-for-purpose' will be sufficient.

Growing Points: New and expanded efforts, on an international basis where possible, need to be developed to better harmonize biospecimen management practices.

Areas Timely For Developing Research: Additional biospecimen methods research leading to the development of evidence-based practices is critical to translational research and personalized medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bmb/ldv012DOI Listing
June 2015

Biobanking in China.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2015 Feb;13(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2015.1311DOI Listing
February 2015

A good year for Biopreservation and Biobanking.

Authors:
Jim Vaught

Biopreserv Biobank 2014 Dec;12(6):361-2

Bethesda, Maryland, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2014.1261DOI Listing
December 2014

Critical issues in international biobanking.

Clin Chem 2014 Nov 6;60(11):1368-74. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Chief, Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch, Cancer Diagnosis Program, US National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2014.224469DOI Listing
November 2014
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