Publications by authors named "Jim Logan"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Chronic wasting disease undermines efforts to control the spread of brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Ecol Appl 2020 09 5;30(6):e02129. Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Veterinary Sciences, College of Agriculture & Natural Resources, University of Wyoming, 1174 Snowy Range Road, Laramie, Wyoming, 82070, USA.

Wildlife diseases pose a substantial threat to the provisioning of ecosystem services. We use a novel modeling approach to study the potential loss of these services through the imminent introduction of chronic wasting disease (CWD) to elk populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). A specific concern is that concentrating elk at feedgrounds may exacerbate the spread of CWD, whereas eliminating feedgrounds may increase the number of elk on private ranchlands and the transmission of a second disease, brucellosis, from elk to cattle. To evaluate the consequences of management strategies given the threat of two concurrent wildlife diseases, we develop a spatiotemporal bioeconomic model. GPS data from elk and landscape attributes are used to predict migratory behavior and population densities with and without supplementary feeding. We use a 4,800 km area around Pinedale, Wyoming containing four existing feedgrounds as a case study. For this area, we simulate welfare estimates under a variety of management strategies. Our results indicate that continuing to feed elk could result in substantial welfare losses for the case-study region. Therefore, to maximize the present value of economic net benefits generated by the local elk population upon CWD's arrival in the region, wildlife managers may wish to consider discontinuing elk feedgrounds while simultaneously developing new methods to mitigate the financial impact to ranchers of possible brucellosis transmission to livestock. More generally, our methods can be used to weigh the costs and benefits of human-wildlife interactions in the presence of multiple disease risks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eap.2129DOI Listing
September 2020

Risk assessment and management of brucellosis in the southern greater Yellowstone area (I): A citizen-science based risk model for bovine brucellosis transmission from elk to cattle.

Prev Vet Med 2016 Sep 22;132:88-97. Epub 2016 Aug 22.

Department of Veterinary Sciences, 1174 Snowy Range Road, Laramie, WY 82070, United States.

Livestock producers and state wildlife agencies have used multiple management strategies to control bovine brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA). However, spillover from elk to domestic bison and cattle herds continues to occur. Although knowledge is increasing about the location and behavior of elk in the SGYA, predicting spatiotemporal overlap between elk and cattle requires locations of livestock operations and observations of elk contact by producers. We queried all producers in a three-county area using a questionnaire designed to determine location of cattle and whether producers saw elk comingle with their animals. This information was used to parameterize a spatially-explicit risk model to estimate the number of elk expected to overlap with cattle during the brucellosis transmission risk period. Elk-cattle overlap was predicted in areas further from roads and forest boundaries in areas with wolf activity, with higher slopes, lower hunter densities, and where the cost-distance to feedgrounds was very low or very high. The model was used to estimate the expected number of years until a cattle reactor will be detected, under alternative management strategies. The model predicted cattle cases every 4.28 years in the highest risk herd unit, a higher prediction than the one case in 26 years we have observed. This difference likely indicates that ongoing management strategies are at least somewhat effective in preventing potential elk-cattle brucellosis transmission in these areas. Using this model, we can infer the expected effectiveness of various management strategies for reducing the risk of brucellosis spillover from elk to cattle.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.08.004DOI Listing
September 2016

Risk factors associated with bovine trichomoniasis in beef cattle identified by a questionnaire.

J Med Microbiol 2014 Jun 12;63(Pt 6):896-902. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Department of Biomedical Sciences and One Health Center for Zoonoses and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 334, Basseterre, St Kitts, West Indies.

Bovine trichomoniasis is a venereal disease that causes substantial economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. It has been endemic in the USA since its discovery in the 1930s. The reasons for this long-lasting endemism are poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to identify herd-level risk factors for trichomoniasis in Wyoming beef cattle. A questionnaire was sent to all Wyoming beef cattle producers. The overall response proportion was 23.4 %. Questionnaires were returned from producers throughout the state in different geographical regions and with various herd sizes. In total, 863 questionnaires were analysed for correlation between the disease endemism and 25 variables. Tritrichomonas foetus infections were found to be significantly (P<0.05) associated with neighbouring a positive herd(s), grazing on public allotments and commingling with other herds. In addition, a delay in fixing broken fences approached statistical significance (P = 0.078). This study provides producers with valuable information and useful suggestions on how to effectively control and reduce the risks of bovine trichomoniasis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.074971-0DOI Listing
June 2014

A different view: changing the way we learn.

Air Med J 2013 Mar-Apr;32(2):71-3

Hospital Wing, Memphis, TN, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amj.2013.01.001DOI Listing
October 2013

Canine distemper outbreak in pet store puppies linked to a high-volume dog breeder.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2012 Nov 25;24(6):1094-8. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA.

Canine distemper is uncommon in the pet trade in the United States, in large part due to effective vaccines against Canine distemper virus (CDV). This is a report of CDV affecting 24 young dogs of multiple breeds shortly after sale by 2 pet stores in Wyoming during August-October 2010. Cases were diagnosed over 37 days. Diagnosis was established by a combination of fluorescent antibody staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, negative stain electron microscopy, and necropsy with histopathology. Viral hemagglutinin gene sequences were analyzed from 2 affected dogs and were identical (GenBank accession no. JF283477). Sequences were distinct from those in a contemporaneous unrelated case of CDV in a Wyoming dog (JF283476) that had no contact with the pet store dogs. The breeding property from which the puppies originated was quarantined by the Kansas Animal Health Department. Puppies intended for sale were tested for CDV. Canine distemper was diagnosed on site in November 2010. At that point 1,466 dogs were euthanized to eliminate dispersal of the disease through commercial channels. The investigation underscores the risks inherent in large-scale dog breeding when vaccination and biosecurity practices are suboptimal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1040638712460531DOI Listing
November 2012
-->