Publications by authors named "Jillian A Macklin"

6 Publications

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Engaging Patients in Care (EPIC): A Framework for Heart Function and Heart Transplant-Specific Patient Engagement.

CJC Open 2019 Mar 29;1(2):43-46. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Ted Rogers Center for Heart Research and Peter Munk Cardiac Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ngaging atients n are (EPIC) is a local patient engagement initiative at the University Health Network for patients and families who have received care for heart failure, heart transplant, or mechanical circulatory support (left ventricular assist device). Patients and caregivers can engage at 4 different levels, including sharing, consulting, deliberating, and collaborating, depending on their knowledge, experience, and available time. The Engaging Patients In Care framework has 4 priority areas: Care Delivery and Policy, Patient Advocacy, Peer Support, and Research. We have identified key engagement barriers with a discussion of possible solutions. We hope this framework can be adapted as an evidentiary baseline for other heart failure and transplant institutions across Canada.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjco.2019.01.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7063628PMC
March 2019

Publisher Correction: Self-renewing resident cardiac macrophages limit adverse remodeling following myocardial infarction.

Nat Immunol 2019 May;20(5):664

Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto, Canada.

In the version of this article initially published, the equal contribution of the third author was omitted. The footnote links for that author should be "Sara Nejat" and the correct statement is as follows: "These authors contributed equally: Sarah A. Dick, Jillian A. Macklin, Sara Nejat." The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41590-019-0363-8DOI Listing
May 2019

A subset of calcium-binding S100 proteins show preferential heterodimerization.

FEBS J 2019 05 21;286(10):1859-1876. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Biochemistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

The assembly of proteins into dimers and oligomers is a necessary step for the proper function of transcription factors, muscle proteins, and proteases. In uncontrolled states, oligomerization can also contribute to illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. The S100 protein family is a group of dimeric proteins that have important roles in enzyme regulation, cell membrane repair, and cell growth. Most S100 proteins have been examined in their homodimeric state, yet some of these important proteins are found in similar tissues implying that heterodimeric molecules can also be formed from the combination of two different S100 members. In this work, we have established co-expression methods in order to identify and quantify the distribution of homo- and heterodimers for four specific pairs of S100 proteins in their calcium-free states. The split GFP trap methodology was used in combination with other GFP variants to simultaneously quantify homo- and heterodimeric S100 proteins in vitro and in living cells. For the specific S100 proteins examined, NMR, mass spectrometry, and GFP trap experiments consistently show that S100A1:S100B, S100A1:S100P, and S100A11:S100B heterodimers are the predominant species formed compared to their corresponding homodimers. We expect the tools developed here will help establish the roles of S100 heterodimeric proteins and identify how heterodimerization might alter the specificity for S100 protein action in cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/febs.14775DOI Listing
May 2019

Self-renewing resident cardiac macrophages limit adverse remodeling following myocardial infarction.

Nat Immunol 2019 01 11;20(1):29-39. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto, Canada.

Macrophages promote both injury and repair after myocardial infarction, but discriminating functions within mixed populations remains challenging. Here we used fate mapping, parabiosis and single-cell transcriptomics to demonstrate that at steady state, TIMD4LYVE1MHC-IICCR2 resident cardiac macrophages self-renew with negligible blood monocyte input. Monocytes partially replaced resident TIMD4LYVE1MHC-IICCR2 macrophages and fully replaced TIMD4LYVE1MHC-IICCR2 macrophages, revealing a hierarchy of monocyte contribution to functionally distinct macrophage subsets. Ischemic injury reduced TIMD4 and TIMD4 resident macrophage abundance, whereas CCR2 monocyte-derived macrophages adopted multiple cell fates within infarcted tissue, including those nearly indistinguishable from resident macrophages. Recruited macrophages did not express TIMD4, highlighting the ability of TIMD4 to track a subset of resident macrophages in the absence of fate mapping. Despite this similarity, inducible depletion of resident macrophages using a Cx3cr1-based system led to impaired cardiac function and promoted adverse remodeling primarily within the peri-infarct zone, revealing a nonredundant, cardioprotective role of resident cardiac macrophages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41590-018-0272-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6565365PMC
January 2019

A CD103 Conventional Dendritic Cell Surveillance System Prevents Development of Overt Heart Failure during Subclinical Viral Myocarditis.

Immunity 2017 11;47(5):974-989.e8

Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto ON, M5G 1L7, Canada; Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON, M5S 1A1, Canada; Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON, M5S 1A1, Canada; Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Toronto ON, M5G 1L7, Canada; Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, Toronto ON, M5G 1L7, Canada. Electronic address:

Innate and adaptive immune cells modulate heart failure pathogenesis during viral myocarditis, yet their identities and functions remain poorly defined. We utilized a combination of genetic fate mapping, parabiotic, transcriptional, and functional analyses and demonstrated that the heart contained two major conventional dendritic cell (cDC) subsets, CD103 and CD11b, which differentially relied on local proliferation and precursor recruitment to maintain their tissue residency. Following viral infection of the myocardium, cDCs accumulated in the heart coincident with monocyte infiltration and loss of resident reparative embryonic-derived cardiac macrophages. cDC depletion abrogated antigen-specific CD8 T cell proliferative expansion, transforming subclinical cardiac injury to overt heart failure. These effects were mediated by CD103 cDCs, which are dependent on the transcription factor BATF3 for their development. Collectively, our findings identified resident cardiac cDC subsets, defined their origins, and revealed an essential role for CD103 cDCs in antigen-specific T cell responses during subclinical viral myocarditis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2017.10.011DOI Listing
November 2017

DIGIT Is a Conserved Long Noncoding RNA that Regulates GSC Expression to Control Definitive Endoderm Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells.

Cell Rep 2016 10;17(2):353-365

Gastrointestinal Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Electronic address:

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) exhibit diverse functions, including regulation of development. Here, we combine genome-wide mapping of SMAD3 occupancy with expression analysis to identify lncRNAs induced by activin signaling during endoderm differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We find that DIGIT is divergent to Goosecoid (GSC) and expressed during endoderm differentiation. Deletion of the SMAD3-occupied enhancer proximal to DIGIT inhibits DIGIT and GSC expression and definitive endoderm differentiation. Disruption of the gene encoding DIGIT and depletion of the DIGIT transcript reveal that DIGIT is required for definitive endoderm differentiation. In addition, we identify the mouse ortholog of DIGIT and show that it is expressed during development and promotes definitive endoderm differentiation of mouse ESCs. DIGIT regulates GSC in trans, and activation of endogenous GSC expression is sufficient to rescue definitive endoderm differentiation in DIGIT-deficient hESCs. Our study defines DIGIT as a conserved noncoding developmental regulator of definitive endoderm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.09.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5120872PMC
October 2016