Publications by authors named "Jihyoun Lee"

27 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Nationwide Study on the Incidence of Breast Cancer in Korean Women with Osteoporosis Receiving Raloxifene Treatment.

J Breast Cancer 2021 Jun 14;24(3):280-288. Epub 2021 May 14.

Department of Breast Surgery, Chungbuk National University Hospital, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.

Purpose: Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and raloxifene treatment for osteoporosis is reimbursable under the Korean National Health Insurance. Evidence suggests that SERMs use reduces the risk of breast cancer in Asian population. Herein, we retrospectively investigated the protective effect of raloxifene on breast cancer rates in Korean population.

Methods: Using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database, we selected women with osteoporosis aged 50 years and above. Patients treated for at least 2 years with raloxifene were assigned to the user group, whereas the remaining patients were assigned to the non-user group. The effect on breast cancer risk was assessed using the Cox proportional-hazards model with a time-dependent covariate to adjust for immortal time bias.

Results: A total of 322,870 women who were registered between 2010 and 2011 were included. The user group comprised 0.7% (n = 2,307) of the total population. The mean age was 65.7 ± 8.0 years and 67.2 ± 8.6 years in the user and non-user groups, respectively ( < 0.001). There was no difference in the previous use of estrogen replacement between the 2 groups ( = 0.087). The incidence of breast cancer per 1,000 person-years was 0.49 (n = 8) and 0.68 (n = 1,714) in the user and non-user groups, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32-1.27). HR decreased with increase in the treatment duration, but this change was not statistically significant (HR, 1.00, 95% CI, 0.32-3.11 in 2-3 years; HR, 0.63, 95% CI, 0.20-1.94 in 3-4 years; and HR, 0.41, 95% CI, 0.10-1.65 in 4-5 years).

Conclusion: Long-term treatment with raloxifene in women with osteoporosis was not significantly associated with a reduction in breast cancer rates. However, further investigation is required for a conclusive proof.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4048/jbc.2021.24.e28DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8250100PMC
June 2021

Clinical Outcomes Following Letrozole Treatment according to Estrogen Receptor Expression in Postmenopausal Women: LETTER Study (KBCSG-006).

J Breast Cancer 2021 Apr 25;24(2):164-174. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Department of Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea.

Purpose: In this trial, we investigated the efficacy and safety of adjuvant letrozole for hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer. Here, we report the clinical outcome in postmenopausal women with HR-positive breast cancer treated with adjuvant letrozole according to estrogen receptor (ER) expression levels.

Methods: In this multi-institutional, open-label, observational study, postmenopausal patients with HR-positive breast cancer received adjuvant letrozole (2.5 mg/daily) for 5 years unless they experienced disease progression or unacceptable toxicity or withdrew their consent. The patients were stratified into the following 3 groups according to ER expression levels using a modified Allred score (AS): low, intermediate, and high (AS 3-4, 5-6, and 7-8, respectively). ER expression was centrally reviewed. The primary objective was the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate.

Results: Between April 25, 2010, and February 5, 2014, 440 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 62.0 months, the 5-year DFS rate in all patients was 94.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.8-96.6). The 5-year DFS and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates did not differ according to ER expression; the 5-year DFS rates were 94.3% and 94.1%in the low-to-intermediate and high expression groups, respectively ( = 0.6), and the corresponding 5-year RFS rates were 95.7% and 95.4%, respectively ( = 0.7). Furthermore, 25 patients discontinued letrozole because of drug toxicity.

Conclusion: Treatment with adjuvant letrozole showed very favorable treatment outcomes and good tolerability among Korean postmenopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer, independent of ER expression.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01069211.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4048/jbc.2021.24.e17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8090806PMC
April 2021

Physicians' Awareness of the Breast Cancer Survivors' Unmet Needs in Korea.

J Breast Cancer 2021 Feb;24(1):85-96

Department of Surgery, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Jeonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonbuk National University and Biomedical Research Institute, Jeonju, Korea.

Purpose: Physicians' awareness of their cancer patients' unmet needs is an essential element for providing effective treatment. This study investigated the accuracy of physicians' awareness of breast cancer survivors' unmet needs in Korea.

Methods: A cross-sectional interview survey was performed among 106 physicians and 320 Korean breast cancer survivors. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment Tool was administered to physicians and cancer survivors after obtaining their written informed consent to participate. Data were analyzed using -test, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis.

Results: The level of unmet needs was highest in the hospital service domain (mean ± standard deviation: 2.19 ± 0.82), and the top-ranked unmet need item was "wished my doctor to be easy, specific, and honest in his/her explanation" (2.44 ± 0.93). Higher unmet needs were correlated with the presence of a genetic counseling clinic. They were not associated with age, sex, marital status, religion, department, working period, type of institution, number of staff, and number of operations. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of a genetic counseling clinic was associated with a higher level of recognition for psychological problems, social support, hospital service, and information and education needs. Physicians overestimated breast cancer survivors' unmet needs in all domains, compared to their self-reported unmet needs. The discordance in the perceived unmet needs was highest in the 'family/personal relationship problems' domain.

Conclusions: Physicians who treat Korean breast cancer survivors rated the level of unmet needs of breast cancer survivors as highest in the hospital service domain. The presence of a genetic counseling clinic in physicians' institutions was associated with a higher perception of survivors' unmet needs. Physicians overestimated the level of unmet needs in Korean breast cancer survivors. Efforts to reduce these discordances are needed to implement optimal survivorship care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4048/jbc.2021.24.e3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7920866PMC
February 2021

Late recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer from needle tract implantation after core needle biopsy: A case report.

World J Clin Cases 2021 Jan;9(1):218-223

Department ofSurgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul 04401, South Korea.

Background: Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has good prognosis so that the local recurrence or distant metastasis can occur later on the lifetime follow up. In this study, we report recurrence of PTC in subcutaneous area combined with lymph node metastasis. A suspicion of needle tract implantation after core needle biopsy was found.

Case Summary: A 66-year-old female patients who underwent right thyroid lobectomy for PTC complained of palpable nodule on anterior neck area. The location of the palpable nodule was not associated with her postoperative scar. After excision of the skin tumor, it was diagnosed as recurrence of PTC. Furthermore, results of subsequent imaging showed lymph node metastasis on her right cervical area. According to the previous medical records, the patient received core needle biopsy through the neck of the patient midline and hematoma was noted after the procedure. The time interval from the first diagnosis to local recurrence or metastasis to the skin and lymph nodes was ten years. As treatment, the patient underwent lymph node dissection in the right and completion thyroidectomy for radioisotope treatment.

Conclusion: Needle tract implantation can occur after core needle biopsy. Further studies are needed to compare core-needle biopsy and fine-needle aspiration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12998/wjcc.v9.i1.218DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7809670PMC
January 2021

Cutaneous ciliated cyst on the anterior neck in young women: A case report.

World J Clin Cases 2020 Oct;8(19):4481-4487

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul 04401, South Korea.

Background: A cutaneous ciliated cyst (CCC) is a rare, benign tumor in young female adults, which is usually found on the lower extremities.

Case Summary: We found an uncommon location of CCC in the anterolateral cervical area and reviewed the literature. A 20-year-old female complained of a well-defined, painless, palpable mass that started several years ago. The mass was tense and movable and located at the anterolateral aspect of the neck. Imaging showed a non-enhancing round mass. Surgical excision biopsy was performed, and the cystic mass was revealed to be a CCC.

Conclusion: The rare location of CCC can be found in anterior neck area, which should be another diagnostic option for mass on anterior neck.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12998/wjcc.v8.i19.4481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7559661PMC
October 2020

Effect of Tamoxifen on the Risk of Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fracture in Younger Breast Cancer Survivors: A Nationwide Study.

Front Oncol 2020 20;10:366. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Although international guidelines recommend bone screening for premenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant tamoxifen, the effects of tamoxifen on osteoporosis and related risks remain controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures in younger breast cancer patients. A nationwide retrospective cohort study was conducted using South Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service claims data. The rates of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture were calculated as incident cases per person-year and disease-free probability rates were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. To identify risk factors for osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture, a multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model was applied. From January 2009 to December 2014, a total of 47,649 breast cancer patients were included. The incidence rates of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture were 23.59 and 2.40 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In the overall population, tamoxifen was significantly associated with a decreased risk of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures 0.76). However, tamoxifen was not associated with the risk of osteoporosis (HR 1.24, CI 0.85-1.82) and osteoporotic fracture (HR 8.15, CI 0.36-186.70) in patients under age 40. In the 40-49 years subgroup, tamoxifen significantly decreased the risk of osteoporosis (HR 0.74, CI 0.65-0.84) and osteoporotic fracture (HR 0.49, CI 0.31-0.76). Tamoxifen is not associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture in premenopausal breast cancer patients. Tailored screening strategies for breast cancer survivors with different osteoporosis risks are needed. Tamoxifen is not associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture in premenopausal breast cancer patients. Tailored screening strategies for breast cancer survivors who are at different risks of developing osteoporosis are needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2020.00366DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098996PMC
March 2020

Effect of Age on Laparoscopic Surgery and Postoperative Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

Ann Coloproctol 2020 Aug 31;36(4):229-242. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: We aimed to evaluate the postoperative complications of laparoscopic colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery and the adverse events of postoperative chemotherapy in elderly patients compared to younger patients and to identify the factors influencing the termination of postoperative chemotherapy.

Methods: Between June 2015 and May 2018, 188 patients with CRC underwent laparoscopic surgery with curative intent. Patients aged ≥ 70 were defined as elderly. Postoperative complications and adverse events of chemotherapy were assessed by using the Clavien-Dindo classification and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, respectively. The clinicopathological factors were analyzed retrospectively.

Results: Seventy-eight patients were considered elderly with a mean age of 77.5 ± 5.5 years. Overall postoperative complications occurred in 68 patients (36.2%). Age and primary tumor location were independent predictors of overall postoperative complications. Smoking history was the only independent predictor of major postoperative complications. Of 113 patients who were recommended postoperative chemotherapy, 90 patients (79.6%) received postoperative chemotherapy. Overall adverse events occurred in 40 patients (44.4%). The American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification and chemotherapy regimen were significantly associated with overall adverse events. The chemotherapy regimen was the only factor significantly associated with severe adverse events. Of 90 patients, postoperative chemotherapy could not be completed in 11 (12.2%). Age was the only factor significantly associated with stopping postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.003).

Conclusion: This study shows that laparoscopic CRC surgery and postoperative chemotherapy were feasible in elderly patients. Further efforts are needed to ensure that elderly patients have the opportunity to make informed decisions regarding postoperative chemotherapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3393/ac.2019.10.03DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7508477PMC
August 2020

Association of Genomic Domains in and with Prostate Cancer Risk and Aggressiveness.

Cancer Res 2020 02 13;80(3):624-638. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Unité de Prévention et d'Epidémiologie Génétique, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France.

Pathogenic sequence variants (PSV) in or () are associated with increased risk and severity of prostate cancer. We evaluated whether PSVs in were associated with risk of overall prostate cancer or high grade (Gleason 8+) prostate cancer using an international sample of 65 and 171 male PSV carriers with prostate cancer, and 3,388 and 2,880 male PSV carriers without prostate cancer. PSVs in the 3' region of (c.7914+) were significantly associated with elevated risk of prostate cancer compared with reference bin c.1001-c.7913 [HR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-2.52; = 0.001], as well as elevated risk of Gleason 8+ prostate cancer (HR = 3.11; 95% CI, 1.63-5.95; = 0.001). c.756-c.1000 was also associated with elevated prostate cancer risk (HR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.71-4.68; = 0.00004) and elevated risk of Gleason 8+ prostate cancer (HR = 4.95; 95% CI, 2.12-11.54; = 0.0002). No genotype-phenotype associations were detected for PSVs in . These results demonstrate that specific PSVs may be associated with elevated risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. SIGNIFICANCE: Aggressive prostate cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers may vary according to the specific BRCA2 mutation inherited by the at-risk individual.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-19-1840DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7553241PMC
February 2020

Unmet needs and related factors of Korean breast cancer survivors: a multicenter, cross-sectional study.

BMC Cancer 2019 Aug 27;19(1):839. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

Department of Surgery, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University and Biomedical Research Institute, 20, Geonji-ro, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Korea.

Background: Identification of specific needs in patients with cancer is very important for the provision of patient-centered medical service. The aim of this study was to investigate the unmet needs and related factors of Korean breast cancer survivors.

Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional, interview survey was performed among 332 Korean breast cancer survivors. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment Tool for cancer patients was administered to survivors who gave written informed consent to participate. Data were analyzed using t-test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis.

Results: The level of unmet needs was highest in the domain 'Information and education' (mean ± SD; 1.70 ± 1.14) and the item with the highest level of unmet needs was 'Needed help in coping with fear of recurrence' (2.04 ± 1.09). Unmet needs were correlated with age, stage, multiplicity, HER2, treatment state, marital status, employment, psychosocial status, and problems in EQ-5D dimensions. In multiple regression analysis, the 50-59 age group showed a higher level of recognition for physical symptom needs and the unemployed group expressed greater needs for information and education. Survivors with multiplicity had greater needs in the domains of healthcare staff and physical symptom. The stress group showed high levels of needs in all domains except religious support. The group with thoughts of suicide showed higher levels of unmet needs for physical symptom.

Conclusion: Most prevalent unmet needs in Korean breast cancer survivors were found in the 'information and education' domain. The 50-59 age group, unemployment, multiplicity, stress and suicidal thoughts were associated with higher levels of unmet needs among Korean breast cancer survivors. Our findings revealed more vulnerable breast cancer survivors with unmet needs and physicians should take a precision approach to satisfy unmet needs of these survivors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-019-6064-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6712787PMC
August 2019

Long-term risk of congestive heart failure in younger breast cancer survivors: A nationwide study by the SMARTSHIP group.

Cancer 2020 01 27;126(1):181-188. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: There is a controversy about late-onset congestive heart failure (CHF) among breast cancer survivors. This study investigated the incidence rate and risk factors of late-onset CHF more than 2 years after the breast cancer diagnosis.

Methods: A nationwide, retrospective study was conducted with the National Health Information Database. With 1:3 age- and sex-matched noncancer controls, Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze the incidence and risk factors of late CHF. The cumulative incidence rate of late CHF was evaluated with a Kaplan-Meier analysis and a log-rank test.

Results: A total of 91,227 cases (286,480 person-years) and 273,681 controls (884,349 person-years) were evaluated between January 2007 and December 2013. The risks of late CHF were higher in cases than controls (hazard ratio [HR], 1.396; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.268-1.538). Younger survivors (age ≤ 50 years) showed a higher risk of late CHF than their younger counterparts (HR, 2.903; 95% CI, 2.425-3.474). Although older age was a risk factor for late CHF, older survivors (age ≥ 66 years) showed no difference in the risk of late CHF in comparison with their counterparts (HR, 0.906; 95% CI, 0.757-1.084). Anthracyclines and taxanes were risk factors for late CHF, although trastuzumab, radiation, and endocrine therapy were not.

Conclusions: Young breast cancer survivors have a greater risk of late CHF than the young population without cancer. More attention should be paid to young breast cancer survivors who receive taxane- or anthracycline-based regimens over the long term.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.32485DOI Listing
January 2020

Nationwide Analysis of Treatment Patterns for Korean Breast Cancer Survivors Using National Health Insurance Service Data.

J Korean Med Sci 2018 Oct 1;33(44):e276. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of Surgery, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.

Background: The National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) established a healthcare claim database for all Korean citizens. This study aimed to analyze the NHIS data and investigate the patterns of breast cancer treatments.

Methods: We constructed a retrospective female breast cancer cohort by analyzing annual incident cases. The annual number of newly diagnosed female breast cancer was compared between the NHIS data and Korea National Cancer Incidence Database (KNCIDB). The annual treatment patterns including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy and targeted therapy were analyzed.

Results: A total of 148,322 women with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer during 2006-2014 was identified. The numbers of newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer cases were similar between the NHIS data and KNCIDB, which demonstrated a strong correlation ( = 0.995; < 0.001). The age distribution of the breast cancer cases in the NHIS data and KNCIDB also showed a strong correlation ( = 1.000; < 0.001). About 85% of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients underwent operations. Although the proportions of chemotherapy use have not changed during 2006-2014, the total number of chemotherapy prescriptions sharply increased during this period. The proportions of radiotherapy and anti-hormonal therapy increased. Among the anti-hormonal agents, tamoxifen was the most frequently prescribed medication, and letrozole was the most preferred endocrine treatment in patients aged ≥ 50 years.

Conclusion: Along with the increased breast cancer incidence in Korea, the frequencies of breast cancer treatments have increased. The NHIS data can be a feasible data source for future research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6200903PMC
October 2018

Height and Body Mass Index as Modifiers of Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2019 04;111(4):350-364

Department of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Background: BRCA1/2 mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast cancer, although other factors may modify this risk. Whether height or body mass index (BMI) modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remains unclear.

Methods: We used Mendelian randomization approaches to evaluate the association of height and BMI on breast cancer risk, using data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 with 14 676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, including 11 451 cases of breast cancer. We created a height genetic score using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score using 93 BMI-associated variants. We examined both observed and genetically determined height and BMI with breast cancer risk using weighted Cox models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results: Observed height was positively associated with breast cancer risk (HR = 1.09 per 10 cm increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0 to 1.17; P = 1.17). Height genetic score was positively associated with breast cancer, although this was not statistically significant (per 10 cm increase in genetically predicted height, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93 to 1.17; P = .47). Observed BMI was inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.90 to 0.98; P = .007). BMI genetic score was also inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase in genetically predicted BMI, HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.98; P = .02). BMI was primarily associated with premenopausal breast cancer.

Conclusion: Height is associated with overall breast cancer and BMI is associated with premenopausal breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Incorporating height and BMI, particularly genetic score, into risk assessment may improve cancer management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djy132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449171PMC
April 2019

Pegfilgrastim for primary prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients undergoing TAC chemotherapy.

Ann Surg Treat Res 2018 May 30;94(5):223-228. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea.

Purpose: Primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor can effectively prevent febrile neutropenia (FN) during breast cancer treatment. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of FN and the ANC profile in patients undergoing chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim primary prophylaxis.

Methods: Patients receiving 6 cycles of adjuvant docetaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (TAC) chemotherapy were included in this study. Pegfilgrastim was administered with analgesics 24 hours after treatment. Laboratory tests were performed on day 0 (before chemotherapy) and ANC was measured daily starting day 5 until it were restored to 1,000/mm. Bone pain was checked via the numeral rating scale (NRS).

Results: A total of 61 patients and 366 cycles were evaluated. Mean age was 49.2 ± 7.1 years. FN was seen in 5 patients (16.4%) and 12 cycles (3.3%) with pegfilgrastim. Grades 3 and 4 neutropenia was seen in 91.5% of cycles with FN. The ANC nadir was most commonly seen at day 7 and the mean ANC nadir depth was 265.7/m. Age was negatively correlated with nadir depth (r = -0.137, P = 0.009). Severe pain higher than NRS 7 occurred in less than 20% of patients after the administration of pegfilgrastim.

Conclusion: Incidence of FN was low during the chemotherapy by primary prophylaxis with pegfilgrastim. The ANC nadir was seen on day 7 after chemotherapy. Bone pain with pegfilgrastim was well tolerated during TAC chemotherapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4174/astr.2018.94.5.223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5931931PMC
May 2018

Reproductive factors as risk modifiers of breast cancer in mutation carriers and high-risk non-carriers.

Oncotarget 2017 Nov 31;8(60):102110-102118. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

This study was conducted to identify the role of reproductive factors as environmental modifiers for breast cancer (BC) risk in clinic-based, East-Asian and mutation carriers and non-carriers with high-risk criteria of mutations (family history (FH) of BC, early-onset BC (aged ≤40 years)). A total of 581 women who were carriers (222 and 359 ), 1,083 non-carriers with FH, and 886 non-carriers with early-onset BC were enrolled and interviewed to examine the reproductive factors, from 2007 to 2014. The hazard ratio (HR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) in the weighted Cox regression model were used to calculate the BC risk based on the reproductive factors. Earlier menarche increased BC risk by 3.49-fold in mutation carriers (95%CI=2.03-6.00) and 3.30-fold in non-carriers with FH (95%CI=1.73-6.34), but was insignificantly associated with carriers and non-carriers for early-onset BC (P-heterogeneity=0.047). Higher parity decreased BC risk in carriers and non-carriers with FH, especially in carriers (HR=0.27, 95% CI=0.09-0.83 for two parity; and HR=0.23, 95%CI=0.05-1.00 for ≥3 parity), but increased the early-onset BC risk (HR=4.63, 95%CI=2.56-8.51 for >3 parity, p-heterogeneity=0.045). Oral contraceptive (OC) use and longer estrogen exposure periods (≥30 years) were associated with an increased risk of early-onset BC (HR=3.99, 95%CI=1.65-9.67; HR=7.69, 95%CI=1.96-25.01), while OC use was not associated with BC risk in other groups and longer estrogen exposure had rather decreased risk for BC risk (both p-heterogeneity<0.001). Several reproductive factors as risk modifiers could heterogeneously be associated with BC among mutation carriers, non-carriers with FH, and early-onset BC non-carriers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.22193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5731939PMC
November 2017

Development of second primary cancer in Korean breast cancer survivors.

Ann Surg Treat Res 2017 Dec 1;93(6):287-292. Epub 2017 Dec 1.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: Breast cancer survivors have slightly increased the risk of second primary cancers. Breast, colon, uterine, and ovarian cancers are common secondary cancers in breast cancer survivors. In this study, we assessed the development of second primary cancers of breast cancer survivors in Korea.

Methods: Medical records of patients with breast cancer in 3 tertiary medical institutions were reviewed retrospectively. We evaluated secondary malignancy diagnosed at least 2 months after the breast cancer diagnosis. Based on the International Classification of Disease-9 codes of malignancies, secondary primary breast cancer records were evaluated with person-year adjustment. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was assessed using national cancer incidence.

Results: A total of 3,444 treatment records were included from 3 medical centers. The cumulative incidence of overall second primary cancers was 2.8% (n = 93). The SIR was significantly higher in all sites (1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-1.91), endometrial cancer (5.65; 95% CI, 2.06-12.31), biliary tract cancer (3.96; 95% CI, 1.19-8.60), and thyroid cancer (2.29; 95% CI, 1.67-3.08).

Conclusion: The incidence of cancer was higher in breast cancer survivors compared to general population. Surveillance of secondary cancer in this group should be recommended individually considering the benefit related to the prognosis of primary breast cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4174/astr.2017.93.6.287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5729121PMC
December 2017

Influence of the Angelina Jolie Announcement and Insurance Reimbursement on Practice Patterns for Hereditary Breast Cancer.

J Breast Cancer 2017 Jun 26;20(2):203-207. Epub 2017 Jun 26.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Lack of awareness, the stigma of carrying a genetic mutation, and economic factors are barriers to acceptance of genetic testing or appropriate risk management. We aimed to investigate the influence of Angelina Jolie's announcement of her medical experience and also health insurance reimbursement for gene testing on practice patterns for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). A survey regarding changes in practice patterns for HBOC before and after the announcement was conducted online. The rate of gene testing was obtained from the National Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. From May to August 2016, 70 physicians responded to the survey. Genetic testing recommendations and prophylactic management were increased after the announcement. Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy was significantly increased in carriers with breast cancer. The testing rate increased annually. Health insurance and a celebrity announcement were associated with increased genetic testing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4048/jbc.2017.20.2.203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5500405PMC
June 2017

Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

J Clin Oncol 2017 Jul 27;35(20):2240-2250. Epub 2017 Apr 27.

Julie Lecarpentier, Karoline B. Kuchenbaecker, Daniel Barrowdale, Joe Dennis, Lesley McGuffog, Goska Leslie, Andrew Lee, Ali Amin Al Olama, Jonathan P. Tyrer, Debra Frost, Steve Ellis, Douglas F. Easton, and Antonis C. Antoniou, University of Cambridge; Karoline B. Kuchenbaecker, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton; Marc Tischkowitz, Addenbrooke's Treatment Centre, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge; D. Gareth Evans, Manchester University, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester; Alex Henderson, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne; Carole Brewer, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter; Diana Eccles, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton; Jackie Cook, Sheffield Children's Hospital, Sheffield; Kai-ren Ong, Birmingham Women's Hospital Healthcare NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham; Lisa Walker, Churchill Hospital, Oxford; Lucy E. Side, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust; Shirley Hodgson, St George's, University of London; Louise Izatt, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust; Ros Eeles, The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust; Nick Orr, The Institute of Cancer Research, London; Mary E. Porteous, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh; Rosemarie Davidson, South Glasgow University Hospitals, Glasgow; Julian Adlard, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom; Valentina Silvestri, Piera Rizzolo, Anna Sara Navazio, Virginia Valentini, Veronica Zelli, and Laura Ottini, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome; Angela Toss, Veronica Medici, and Laura Cortesi, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena; Ines Zanna and Domenico Palli, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, Florence; Paolo Radice, Siranoush Manoukian, Bernard Peissel, and Jacopo Azzollini, Fondazione Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Istituto Nazionale Tumori (INT); Paolo Peterlongo, Italian Foundation for Cancer Research Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM), Milan; Alessandra Viel and Giulia Cini, CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, Aviano; Giuseppe Damante, University of Udine, Udine; Stefania Tommasi, Istituto Nazionale Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari; Elisa Alducci, Silvia Tognazzo, and Marco Montagna, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Padua; Maria A. Caligo, University and University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Penny Soucy and Jacques Simard, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Research Center and Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec; Anna Marie Mulligan and Irene L. Andrulis, University of Toronto; Gord Glendon and Irene L. Andrulis, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Melissa Southey, Ian Campbell, Paul James, and Gillian Mitchell, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria; Amanda B. Spurdle, Helene Holland, and Georgia Chenevix-Trench, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland; Ian Campbell, Paul James, and Gillian Mitchell, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, New South Wales, Australia; Esther M. John, Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont; Linda Steele, Yuan Chun Ding, Susan L. Neuhausen, and Jeffrey N. Weitzel, City of Hope, Duarte, CA; Thomas A. Conner and Saundra S. Buys, Huntsman Cancer Institute; David E. Goldgar, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT; Andrew K. Godwin, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City; Priyanka Sharma, University of Kansas Medical Center, Westwood, KS; Timothy R. Rebbeck, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; Joseph Vijai, Mark Robson, Anne Lincoln, Jacob Musinsky, Pragna Gaddam, and Kenneth Offit, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Jennifer T. Loud and Mark H. Greene, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Amanda Ewart Toland and Leigha Senter, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Dezheng Huo, Sarah M. Nielsen, and Olufunmilayo I. Olopade, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL; Katherine L. Nathanson and Susan M. Domchek, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Christa Lorenchick and Rachel C. Jankowitz, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA; Fergus J. Couch, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Ramunas Janavicius, State Research Institute Innovative Medicine Center, Vilnius, Lithuania; Thomas V.O. Hansen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen; Anders Bojesen and Henriette Roed Nielsen, Vejle Hospital, Vejle; Anne-Bine Skytte, Lone Sunde, and Uffe Birk Jensen, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; Inge Sokilde Pedersen, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg; Lotte Krogh, Torben A. Kruse, and Mads Thomassen, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Ana Osorio, National Cancer Research Centre and Spanish Network on Rare Diseases; Miguel de la Hoya, Vanesa Garcia-Barberan, Trinidad Caldes, and Pedro Perez Segura, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, El Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid; Judith Balmaña, University Hospital, Vall d'Hebron; Sara Gutiérrez-Enríquez and Orland Diez, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology; Orland Diez, University Hospital Vall d'Hebron; Alex Teulé, Jesús Del Valle, Lidia Feliubadalo, Miquel Angel Pujana, and Conxi Lazaro, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona; Angel Izquierdo, Esther Darder, and Joan Brunet, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Girona, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Girona, Spain; Florentia Fostira, National Centre for Scientific Research "Demokritos," Athens, Greece; Ute Hamann, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ); Christian Sutter, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg; Alfons Meindl, Klinikumrechts der Isar, Technical University Munich; Nina Ditsch, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich; Andrea Gehrig, University Würzburg, Würzburg; Bernd Dworniczak, University of Münster, Münster; Christoph Engel, University of Leipzig; Dorothea Wand, University Hospital, Leipzig; Dieter Niederacher, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf; Doris Steinemann, Hannover Medical School, Hannover; Eric Hahnen, Jan Hauke, Kerstin Rhiem, Barbara Wappenschmidt, and Rita K. Schmutzler, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne; Karin Kast, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Dresden; Norbert Arnold, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel; Shan Wang-Gohrke, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany; Christine Lasset, Francesca Damiola, and Laure Barjhoux, Centre Léon Bérard; Sylvie Mazoyer, University of Lyon, Lyon; Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet and Muriel Belotti, Institut Curie, Paris, France; Mattias Van Heetvelde, Bruce Poppe, Kim De Leeneer, and Kathleen B.M. Claes, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium; Johanna I. Kiiski, Sofia Khan, and Heli Nevanlinna, University of Helsinki; Johanna I. Kiiski, Kristiina Aittomäki, Sofia Khan, and Heli Nevanlinna, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Christi J. van Asperen, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; Tibor Vaszko, Miklos Kasler, and Edith Olah, National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary; Adalgeir Arason, Bjarni A. Agnarsson, Oskar Th. Johannsson, and Rosa B. Barkardottir, Landspitali University Hospital and Biomedical Centre, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Manuel R. Teixeira and Pedro Pinto, Portuguese Oncology Institute; Manuel R. Teixeira, Porto University, Porto, Portugal; Jong Won Lee, Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center; Min Hyuk Lee and Jihyoun Lee, Soonchunhyang University and Hospital; Sung-Won Kim and Eunyoung Kang, Daerim St Mary's Hospital; Sue Kyung Park, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul; Zisun Kim, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; Yen Y. Tan, Andreas Berger, and Christian F. Singer, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Sook-Yee Yoon and Soo-Hwang Teo, Sime Darby Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia; and Anna von Wachenfeldt, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2016.69.4935DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5501359PMC
July 2017

The prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Korean population: recent update of the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) study.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2015 May 12;151(1):157-68. Epub 2015 Apr 12.

Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707, Korea.

The Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) study was established to evaluate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations in Korean breast cancer patients at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 2953 subjects (2403 index patients and 550 family members of affected carriers) from 36 centers participated in this study between May 2007 and December 2013. All participants received genetic counseling and BRCA genetic testing. In total, 378 mutation carriers among 2403 index patients were identified. The prevalence of BRCA mutations in specific subgroups was as follows: 22.3 % (274/1228) for breast cancer patients with a family history of breast/ovarian cancers, 8.8 % (39/441) for patients with early-onset (<35 years) breast cancer without a family history, 16.3 % (34/209) for patients with bilateral breast cancer, 4.8 % (1/21) for male patients with breast cancer, and 37.5 % (3/8) for patients with both breast and ovarian cancer. From an analysis of the mutation spectrum, 63 BRCA1 and 90 BRCA2 different mutations, including 44 novel mutations, were identified. The c.7480 (p.Arg2494Ter) mutation in BRCA2 (10.1 %) was the most commonly identified in this cohort. The KOHBRA study is the largest cohort to identify BRCA mutation carriers in Asia. The results suggest that the prevalence of BRCA mutations in familial breast cancer patients is similar to that among Western cohorts. However, some single risk factors without family histories (early-onset breast cancer, male breast cancer, or multiple organ cancers) may limit the utility of BRCA gene testing in the Korean population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-015-3377-4DOI Listing
May 2015

The reality in the follow-up of breast cancer survivors: survey of Korean Breast Cancer Society.

Ann Surg Treat Res 2015 Mar 27;88(3):133-9. Epub 2015 Feb 27.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: Follow-up after primary treatment for breast cancer is an important component of survivor care and various international guidelines exist for the surveillance. However, little is known about current actual practice patterns of physicians whether they adhere to or deviate from recommended guidelines. The aim of this study was to determine how physicians follow-up their patients after primary treatment for breast cancer in Korea.

Methods: A questionnaire survey with 34 questions in 4 categories was e-mailed to the members of Korean Breast Cancer Society from November to December 2013. Respondents were asked how they use follow-up modalities after primary treatment of breast cancer and we compared the survey results with present guidelines.

Results: Of the 129 respondents, 123 (95.3%) were breast surgeons. The most important consideration in follow-up was tumor stage. History taking, physical examinations, and mammography were conducted in similar frequency recommended by other guidelines while breast ultrasonography was performed more often. The advanced imaging studies such as CT, MRI, and bone scan, which had been recommended to be conducted only if necessary, were also examined more frequently. Regular screenings for secondary malignancy were performed in 38 respondents (29.5%). Five years later after primary treatment, almost the whole respondents (94.6%) themselves monitored their patients.

Conclusion: A majority of respondents have been performed more intensive follow-up modalities in comparison with present guidelines and less frequently screenings for secondary malignancy. For optimal follow-up of breast cancer survivors, tailored delivery system should be considered.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4174/astr.2015.88.3.133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4347047PMC
March 2015

Targeted gold nanoparticles enhance sensitization of prostate tumors to megavoltage radiation therapy in vivo.

Nanomedicine 2015 Jul 31;11(5):1277-83. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: We report potent radiosensitization of prostate cancers in vitro and in vivo using goserelin-conjugated gold nanorods. Progressive receptor-mediated internalization of conjugated nanorods over time increases the radiation interaction cross-section of cells and contributes to the effects observed in vitro. The low concentrations of gold required, the long interval between injection of nanoparticles and radiation, and the use of megavoltage radiation to generate radiosensitization in vivo foretell the possibility of eventual clinical translation of this approach.

From The Clinical Editor: The ability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to enhance the effect of physical radiation dose on tumor cells is known. This radiosensitization effect is thought to result from an increased number of photoelectric absorption events and the increased number of electrons present in gold. The authors here sought to further increase the amount and specificity of gold accumulation in prostatic cancer cells by conjugating gold nanorods to goserelin, a synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue that would bind to the LHRH receptor overexpressed in prostate cancers. It was shown that tumour cells were more sensitive to megavoltage radiation therapy. It is hoped that there would be eventual clinical translation of this approach.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2014.12.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4476911PMC
July 2015

Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: promise and potential pitfalls.

Cancer Lett 2014 May 17;347(1):46-53. Epub 2014 Feb 17.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles' potential clinical applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2014.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142062PMC
May 2014

The effects of a genetic counseling educational program on hereditary breast cancer for korean healthcare providers.

J Breast Cancer 2013 Sep 30;16(3):335-41. Epub 2013 Sep 30.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: Systematic educational programs and genetic counseling certification courses for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) have not yet been introduced in Korea. We provided and evaluated the effects of genetic counseling education on Korean healthcare providers' knowledge, awareness, and counseling skills for patients at high risk of HBOC.

Methods: A 3-day educational program was conducted for healthcare providers who were interested in genetic counseling for patients at high risk of HBOC. Participants who completed a knowledge test and satisfaction questionnaire were included in the present sample. Pre-post comparisons were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention.

Results: Significant differences between preprogram and postprogram knowledge scores were observed (p=0.002). Awareness (p<0.001) and confidence (p<0.001) regarding genetic counseling significantly increased after the training. Doctors and participants with fewer years of work experience performed well on the knowledge test. Previous educational experience was correlated with increased confidence in knowledge and counseling skills.

Conclusion: Genetic counseling education regarding HBOC improved knowledge and awareness of HBOC and enhanced confidence in the counseling process. The effects varied according to occupation and participants' previous education. The implementation of systematic educational programs that consider participant characteristics may improve the effects of such interventions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4048/jbc.2013.16.3.335DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3800731PMC
September 2013

Convergence of nanotechnology with radiation therapy-insights and implications for clinical translation.

Transl Cancer Res 2013 Aug;2(4):256-268

Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.

Improvements in accuracy and efficacy in treating tumors with radiation therapy (RT) over the years have been fueled by parallel technological and conceptual advances in imaging and image-guidance techniques, radiation treatment machines, computational methods, and the understanding of the biology of tumor response to RT. Recent advances in our understanding of the hallmarks of cancer and the emergence of strategies to combat these traits of cancer have resulted in an expanding repertoire of targeted therapeutics, many of which can be exploited for enhancing the efficacy of RT. Complementing this advent of new treatment options is the evolution of our knowledge of the interaction between nanoscale materials and human tissues (nanomedicine). As with the changes in RT paradigms when the field has encountered newer and maturing disciplines, the incorporation of nanotechnology innovations into radiation oncology has the potential to refine or redefine its principles and revolutionize its practice. This review provides a summary of the principles, applications, challenges and outlook for the use of metallic nanoparticles in RT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2218-676X.2013.08.10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4179207PMC
August 2013

Toxicity and quality of life of Korean breast cancer patients treated with docetaxel-containing chemotherapy without primary G-CSF prophylaxis.

Breast Cancer 2014 Nov 1;21(6):670-6. Epub 2013 Feb 1.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, 657 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, Korea,

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and quality of life (QoL) of breast cancer patients treated with a docetaxel-containing chemotherapeutic regimen and to compare adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) for four cycles followed by docetaxel (D) for four cycles with docetaxel, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide (TAC) for six cycles without primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis.

Methods: Node-positive breast cancer patients who received surgery from three hospitals were included. Subjects received docetaxel-containing chemotherapy and completed a questionnaire on QoL (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23) at each cycle. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria.

Results: All 78 eligible subjects and 542 cycles were analyzed. The incidence of dose reduction and grade 3 edema was higher in the AC-D group. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was significantly increased in the TAC group (63.4 %) compared to the AC-D group (29.7 %). Grade 3 or 4 anemia was higher in the TAC group, and grade 3 or 4 arthralgia was higher in the AC-D group. There were no significant differences in severe nausea and vomiting, fatigue, neuropathy, and peripheral edema. Baseline quality of life showed no difference between the two groups. The global health status decreased during chemotherapy and recovered to baseline level 3 months after chemotherapy.

Conclusion: Although the incidence of febrile neutropenia was high without primary G-CSF prophylaxis and was more severe in the TAC group, QoL revealed comparable results in both regimens; therefore, it could be one of the considerations in the choice of treatment strategy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12282-013-0442-xDOI Listing
November 2014

Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction: a retrospective analysis of the surgical and patient-reported outcomes.

World J Surg Oncol 2012 Nov 29;10:259. Epub 2012 Nov 29.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-743, Korea.

Background: Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and latissimus dorsi (LD) flap immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) is a tailored surgical procedure. The surgical and patient-reported outcome (PRO) of SSM and LD IBR were assessed.

Methods: Retrospective data of 146 SSMs performed by a single surgeon was reviewed. Among patients included in the data, 65 patients underwent SSM and LD IBR without a prosthetic implant. A survey estimating the degree of patient satisfaction (poor, fair, good, and excellent) as regards the cosmetic outcomes of surgery was performed. The patients were divided into two groups according to their degree of satisfaction (excellent group versus non- excellent group), and analysis was done to identify factors affecting the highest patient satisfaction.

Results: The mean age of the patients was 48.4 years, and pathological results were: infiltrating ductal carcinoma (n = 48, 73.8%), ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 15, 23.1%), and others (n = 2, 3.1%). One patient received postmastectomy radiotherapy. After a mean follow-up of 34 months, no local recurrence occurred. There was no skin necrosis or LD flap loss. Donor site morbidities were seroma (n = 8, 12.3%), scarring (n = 8, 12.3%), and back pain (n = 6, 9.2%). Fifty patients (76.9%) were satisfied and 40% reported their degree of satisfaction as excellent. Breast symmetry (P <0.001), nipple cosmesis (P <0.001), visual difference of bilateral breasts (P = 0.021), and panel assessment score (P <0.001) were factors that affected the highest patient satisfaction.

Conclusions: Our SSM and LD IBR was safe, with no local recurrence and low morbidities, and produced a sufficiently high level of patient satisfaction. Achieving breast symmetry and nipple cosmesis would be the key to meeting the patient's expectation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1477-7819-10-259DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551768PMC
November 2012

Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma occured alone in axilla.

J Korean Surg Soc 2012 May 26;82(5):330-4. Epub 2012 Apr 26.

Department of Surgery, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (IDCS) is a very rare disease around the world and its prognosis is known to be aggressive. This reports a case diagnosed as IDCS of the axillary region treated in Soonchunhyang University Hospital. A 57-year-old female visited Soonchunhyang University Hospital with a left axillary mass. The mass was hard and fixed. Computed tomography observed a 7 cm lymph node at the left axilla, and core biopsy suspected sarcoma. In another study, there was no specific finding except the axillary lesion. Left axillary lymph node dissection (level I, II) was conducted and the pathologic report finally showed IDCS. The patient was treated with only radiotherapy and followed up without recurrence for 13 months up to now. IDCS is a very rare sarcoma that is hard to diagnose and progresses fast. Thus, treatment is very difficult. Proper treatment can be better established after more experiences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4174/jkss.2012.82.5.330DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3341485PMC
May 2012