Publications by authors named "Jianhua Dong"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prognosis of severe drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis requiring renal replacement therapy.

Ren Fail 2021 Dec;43(1):1020-1027

National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, China.

Objective: Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (DAIN) is often associated with improved outcomes, whereas some patients may still progress to chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognosis of patients with severe DAIN requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) at baseline, and to explore the risk factors of progression to CKD.

Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients with severe DAIN confirmed by renal biopsies in our center over a 10 years period, all the patients received RRT at presentation. The clinical and pathological characteristics at baseline were recorded, and the outcomes (renal function recovered or progressed to CKD) during follow-ups were also evaluated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to identify the independent risk factors of progression to CKD.

Results: Seventy-two patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled, 13 patients (18.0%) progressed to CKD (GFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m) after at least 6 months of follow-up, the remaining 59 patients achieved a favorable renal function recovery. Compared with patients who achieved renal function recovery (recovery group), the patients progressed to CKD (progression group) were older and had longer interval from symptom onset to treatment with steroids. The peak serum cystatin C concentration was higher in progression group than recovery group. Higher score of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IFTA) and more interstitial inflammatory cells infiltration were detected in renal tissue in progression group. According to multivariable analysis, higher peak cystatin C concentration (OR = 2.443, 95% CI 1.257, 4.746,  = 0.008), longer interval to treatment with corticosteroids (OR = 1.183, 95% CI 1.035, 1.352,  = 0.014) were independent risk factors of progression to CKD. The cutoff value of cystatin C concentration was 4.34 mg/L, at which the sensitivity and specificity were 76.9% and 89.3%, respectively; the cutoff value of interval to treatment with corticosteroids was 22.5 days, at which the sensitivity and specificity were 81.8% and 79.5%, respectively.

Conclusion: Renal function was reversible in majority of patients with severe DAIN requiring RRT when early identification and treatment. Higher peak cystatin C concentration and longer interval to treatment with corticosteroids associated with worse renal prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0886022X.2021.1942914DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8253213PMC
December 2021

suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells by repressing oncogene .

Aging (Albany NY) 2021 04 20;13(8):11665-11677. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Colorectal Cancer Surgery, Yunnan Cancer Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650118, China.

Colorectal cancer (CRC), a common malignant tumor in the digestive tract, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. has been reported to act as a tumor suppressor gene in various tumors. This study aims to assess the role of SPRY4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and uncover its underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the expression levels of were measured in CRC cell lines. -overexpressing or silencing plasmids were transfected into CRC cells to regulate its expression level. CCK-8, colony formation, EdU assay, wound-healing and Transwell assays were performed to determine cell proliferation, invasion and migration abilities. Then, apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of apoptosis-related protein was analyzed by western-blotting. Next, the tumorigenesis assay was performed in nude mice. According to the results, there was a lower expression of in CRC cell lines compared with normal cell line, and the overexpression of significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and promoted apoptosis in SW480 cells. Moreover, the enhanced proliferation, invasion and migration upon silencing was reversed by inhibition. In addition, we found that the overexpression of inhibited tumorigenesis by diminishing the size and weight of the tumors. Our study indicates that might be a potential tumor suppressor gene and prognostic factor for patients with CRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.202859DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8109073PMC
April 2021

Comparative chloroplast genomes and phylogenetic analysis of .

Appl Plant Sci 2021 Mar 16;9(3):e11412. Epub 2021 Mar 16.

Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of Ministry of Education Northeast Normal University Changchun 130024 China.

Premise: is an ideal taxon for studying the evolution of adaptive radiation. Current phylogenies of based on different molecular markers are inconsistent, and therefore a clear and accurate phylogeny remains uncertain. Analyzing the chloroplast genome, with its simple structure and low recombination rate, may help solve this problem.

Methods: Next-generation sequencing data were generated or downloaded for species, enabling their chloroplast genomes to be assembled. The assemblies were used to estimate the genome characteristics and infer the phylogeny of .

Results: In this study, chloroplast genome sequences were assembled for species distributed across Asia, North America, and Europe. Three of the genes analyzed (, , and ) were shown to be under positive selection and may be related to adaptation. The phylogenetic tree of showed that its member species formed two clades with high support, North American and European species, with the Asian species being paraphyletic; and clustered with the North American species, while the remaining Asian species were found in the European clade. In addition, var. should be considered as a separate species rather than a variety.

Discussion: The complete chloroplast genomes of these species provide new insights into the reconstruction of the phylogeny of related species and contribute to the further study of this genus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aps3.11412DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8027367PMC
March 2021

Platelet Distribution Width and Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2021 15;2021:6633845. Epub 2021 Mar 15.

Jinling Hospital Department of Nephrology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

Objectives: The association between platelet distribution width (PDW) and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients has received little attention.

Methods: We retrospectively enrolled HD patients in a single center from January 1, 2008, to December 30, 2011. The primary and secondary endpoints were all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively. The association between PDW and mortality was estimated by Cox regression model.

Results: Of 496 patients, the mean age was 52.5 ± 16.6 years, and the Charlson comorbidity index was 4.39 ± 1.71. During the follow-up period of 48.8 ± 6.7 months, 145 patients (29.2%) died, including 74 (14.9%) cardiovascular deaths. 258 (52.0%) with PDW < 16.31% were in the low group and 238 (48.0%) in those with PDW ≥ 16.31% according to cut-off for all-cause mortality by receiving-operator characteristics. After adjusting for confounding factors, high PDW values were independently associated with higher risk of all-cause (hazards ratio (HR) = 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-6.82) and cardiovascular deaths (HR = 2.26, 95% CI 1.44-3.63) in HD patients. When comparing with quartile 1 of PDW, quartile 4 of PDW was independently associated with a higher risk of all-cause (HR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.18-5.30) and cardiovascular deaths (HR = 2.71, 95% CI 1.49-3.76) in HD patients.

Conclusions: Baseline PDW was independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6633845DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7987410PMC
March 2021

Clinical Efficacy of Controlled-Release Morphine Tablets Combined with Celecoxib in Pain Management and the Effects on WNK1 Expression.

Clinics (Sao Paulo) 2021 20;76:e1907. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Department of Spinal Cord Repairing, 960 Hospital of the Joint Logistics Support Force of PLA, Jinan, China.

Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of controlled-release morphine tablets combined with celecoxib in relieving osteocarcinoma-related pain and the effects of the combination on WNK1 expression.

Methods: A total of 110 patients with osteocarcinoma-related pain were selected and divided into two groups based on the treatment administered, including the control group (treated with controlled-release morphine tablets alone) and the study group (treated with a combination of controlled-release morphine tablets and celecoxib). We compared the treatment efficacy, pain level (visual analog scale (VAS)), time of onset of breakthrough pain (BTP), dose of morphine, incidence of adverse events, quality of life (QOL) score, and With-no-lysine 1 (WNK1) expression in the peripheral blood (PB) as determined with qRT-PCR before and after treatment, of the two groups.

Results: The total effective rate of the study group was higher than that of the control group, while the VAS score, time of onset of BTP, dose of morphine, incidence of adverse events, QOL score, and relative WNK1 expression in the PB were lower than those of the control group (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Combination treatment with controlled-release morphine tablets and celecoxib can be extensively used in the clinical setting because it effectively improves the symptoms, QOL score, and adverse effects in patients with osteocarcinoma-related pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2021/e1907DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7798123PMC
April 2021

Dentatin exerts anticancer effects on human colon cancer cell lines via cell cycle arrest, autophagy, inhibition of cell migration and JAK/STAT signalling pathway.

J BUON 2019 Jul-Aug;24(4):1488-1493

Department of Colorectal Cancer Surgery, and 2Department of Pharmacy, Yunnan Cancer Hospital and the Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University , Kunming , Yunnan, 650118, China.

Purpose: Colon cancer is a malignant disease with significant mortality. In the present study the anticancer effects of a carbazole alkaloid, Dentatin, were examined against colon cancer cells.

Methods: The colon cancer HT-29 cell line and the normal CCD-18 CO colon cell line were used in the present study. MTT assay was used to check the proliferation rate of the cancer cells. Autophagy was detected by electron microscopy. DNA damage was checked by alkaline comet assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Cell migration was monitored by wound healing assay. Protein expression was checked by western blot analysis.

Results: The results showed that Dentatin inhibited the growth of HT-29 cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner and with IC50 of 25 µM. However, the IC50 of Dentatin against the normal CCD-18CO colon cells was four times higher (ie.,100 µM). Dentatin inhibited the proliferation of the HT-29 cancer cells by triggering S-phase arrest. This was also accompanied with increase in the expression of cyclin D1 and decrease in the expression of Cyclin A and B1. Moreover, Dentatin also induced autophagy in the HT-29 cells which was associated with upregulation of LC3 II and downregulation of Beclin-1 expression. Comet assay revealed that Dentatin induced DNA damage in the HT-29 cells. Dentatin also significantly inhibited the migration of the HT-29 cells. Finally the effects of Dentatin were examined on the JAK/STAT signalling pathway and it was found that Dentatin inhibited this pathway.

Conclusion: Dentatin may prove to be an essential lead molecule for the management of colon cancer.
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March 2020

[Comparison of the application among intensity-modulated radiotherapy, 3D-conformal radiotherapy and conventional radiotherapy for locally advanced middle-low rectal cancer].

Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi 2018 Dec;21(12):1414-1420

Department of Colorectal Surgery, Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650118, China.

Objective: To compare the application among intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3D-CRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced middle-low rectal cancer.

Methods: From January 2015 to December 2016, 93 locally advanced middle-low rectal cancer patients with clinical stage cT3N+M0 or cT4N0/+M0 who underwent preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy at Department of Colorectal Surgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University and had complete data were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into IMRT group (17 cases), 3D-CRT group (28 cases) and CRT group (48 cases) according to different radiotherapy methods. The frequency and dose of CRT were 1 time/day, 5 times/week, for a total of 5 weeks, with a single dose of 2.0 Gy, the total dose was 50 Gy. Frequency and dose of 3D-CRT and IMRT were 1 time/day, 5 times/week, for a total of 23 to 28 times, with a single dose of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy, and a total dose of 45.0 to 50.4 Gy. The chemotherapy regimen was performed with capecitabine tablets at a dose of 825 mg/m twice a day for 5 days every week, at the same time during radiotherapy. The efficacy, chemotherapy adverse reactions and immune function of the three groups were compared.

Results: There was no significant difference in the baseline data among the three groups (all P>0.05). The proportion of patients receiving permanent ostomy in the IMRT group and the 3D-CRT group was 29.4%(5/17) and 32.1%(9/28) respectively, which was lower than 58.3%(28/48) in CRT group, and the difference was statistically significant (χ²=7.982, P=0.030), while this proportion was not significantly different between IMRT and 3D-CRT group(χ²=0.037, P=0.848). The pathologic complete response(pCR) rate was 23.7%(22/93) in the whole study, and the pCR rate was 39.3%(11/28) in the 3D-CRT group, which was higher than that of CRT group and IMRT group [12.5%(6/48) and 29.4%(5/17)], and the difference was statistically significant (χ²=7.407, P=0.025), while there was no significant difference in pCR rate between CRT group and IMRT group (χ²=2.554, P=0.110). There was no adverse reaction of grade 3 or above in all three groups. No significant difference in the incidence of bone marrow suppression, abnormal liver and kidney function markers, digestive tract reaction or radiation dermatitis was found(all P>0.05). After receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the proportion of CD3/CD4 cells in the IMRT group and the CRT group decreased compared with that before treatment(23.1±9.3 vs. 31.1±10.9, 27.4±10.7 vs. 33.6±7.2, respectively); the proportion of CD3/CD8 cells was up-regulated (36.1±15.2 vs. 24.8±10.9, 30.9±14.4 vs. 24.0±8.3,respectively), and the differences were statistically significant (both P<0.05), while the above indexes before and after treatment were not significantly different in the 3D-CRT group(all P>0.05). After treatment, the proportion of CD4/CD8 cells in IMRT group decreased (0.8±0.6 vs. 1.6±1.0, t=3.838, P=0.003), while this proportion was not significantly different in CRT group and 3D-CRT group(all P>0.05).

Conclusions: IMRT and 3D-CRT can reduce the rate of permanent stoma. 3D-CRT can increase pCR rate. No obvious advantage is shown in IMRT as compared with 3D-CRT in the short-term efficacy. On the contrary, an immunosuppressive status may occur. Therefore, 3D-CRT is recommended as the best preoperative treatment strategy for patients with locally advanced middle-low rectal cancer, especially for those with immunosuppression status.
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December 2018

Author Correction: Mapping the epidemic changes and risks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Shaanxi Province, China, 2005-2016.

Sci Rep 2018 Apr 13;8(1):6234. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi'an, 710061, China.

A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has not been fixed in the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24102-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897451PMC
April 2018

Mapping the epidemic changes and risks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Shaanxi Province, China, 2005-2016.

Sci Rep 2018 01 15;8(1):749. Epub 2018 Jan 15.

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi'an, 710061, China.

Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a major rodent-borne zoonosis. Each year worldwide, 60,000-100,000 HFRS human cases are reported in more than seventy countries with almost 90% these cases occurring in China. Shaanxi Province in China has been among the most seriously affected areas since 1955. During 2009-2013, Shaanxi reported 11,400 human cases, the most of all provinces in China. Furthermore, the epidemiological features of HFRS have changed over time. Using long-term data of HFRS from 2005 to 2016, we carried out this retrospective epidemiological study combining ecological assessment models in Shaanxi. We found the majority of HFRS cases were male farmers who acquired infection in Guanzhong Plain, but the geographic extent of the epidemic has slowly spread northward. The highest age-specific attack rate since 2011 was among people aged 60-74 years, and the percentage of HFRS cases among the elderly increased from 12% in 2005 to 25% in 2016. We highly recommend expanding HFRS vaccination to people older than 60 years to better protect against the disease. Multivariate analysis revealed artificial area, cropland, pig and population density, GDP, and climate conditions (relative humidity, precipitation, and wind speed) as significant risk factors in the distribution of HFRS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-18819-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5768775PMC
January 2018

SUMO E3 Ligase PIASy Mediates High Glucose-Induced Activation of NF-B Inflammatory Signaling in Rat Mesangial Cells.

Mediators Inflamm 2017 5;2017:1685194. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000, China.

Background: Sumoylation is extensively involved in the regulation of NF-B signaling. PIASy, as a SUMO E3 ligase, has been proved to mediate sumoylation of IB kinase (IKK) and contribute to the activation of NF-B under genotoxic agent stimulation. However, the association of PIASy and NF-B signaling in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) has not been defined.

Methods: Rat glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) were stimulated by high glucose; siRNA was constructed to silence the expression of PIASy; the expression of PIASy, SUMO isoforms (SUMO1, SUMO2/3), and NF-B signaling components was analyzed by Western blot; the interaction between IKK and SUMO proteins was detected by coimmunoprecipitation; and the release of inflammatory cytokines MCP-1 and IL-6 was assayed by ELISA.

Results: High glucose significantly upregulated the expression of PIASy, SUMO1, and SUMO2/3 in a dose- and time-dependent manner ( < 0.05), induced the phosphorylation and sumoylation of IKK ( < 0.05), and then triggered NF-B signaling whereas MCP-1 and IL-6 were released from GMCs ( < 0.05). Moreover, these high glucose-induced effects were observably reversed by siRNA-mediated knockdown of PIASy ( < 0.05).

Conclusion: The SUMO E3 ligase PIASy mediates high glucose-induced activation of NF-B inflammatory signaling, suggesting that PIASy may be a potential therapeutic target of DN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/1685194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5605875PMC
June 2018

The Salutary Influence of Forest Bathing on Elderly Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2017 03 31;14(4). Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Geriatrics & Geriatrics Institute of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang Hospital, No.12 Lingyin Road, Hangzhou 310013, China.

The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that forest bathing would be beneficial for elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) as an adjunctive therapy. Two groups of participants with CHF were simultaneously sent to the forest or an urban control area for a four-day trip, respectively. Subjects exposed to the forest site showed a significant reduction of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in comparison to that of the city group and their own baseline levels. The values for the cardiovascular disease related pathological factors, including endothelin-1 (ET-1), and constituents of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including renin, angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin II (ANGII), and ANGII receptor type 1 or 2 (AT1 or AT2) in subjects exposed to the forest environment were lower than those in the urban control group. Obviously, a decreased level of inflammatory cytokines and improved antioxidant function was observed in the forest group rather than in the city group. The assessment of the profile of mood states (POMS) indicated that the negative emotional mood state was alleviated after forest bathing. As anticipated, a better air quality in the forest site was observed according to the detection of PM (particulate matter <2.5 μm) and negative ions. These results provided direct evidence that forest bathing has a beneficial effect on CHF patients, and thus may pave the way for potential development of forest bathing as an effective adjunctive therapy on cardiovascular disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14040368DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5409569PMC
March 2017

Outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer in elderly patients.

J BUON 2016 Jan-Feb;21(1):80-6

Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan, 650118, People's Republic of China.

Purpose: Elderly patients with rectal cancer are regarded as being at increased risk during radical resection because of lack of functional reserve and increased number of comorbidities. The aim of this study was to compare the short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery with radical intent between elderly and young rectal cancer patients.

Methods: Three-hundred ten patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery with radical intent for rectal cancer at our institution between January 2008 and December 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two age groups (younger than 70 years and older than 70 years) and were evaluated with respect to short- and long-term outcomes.

Results: Postoperative morbidity was similar in elderly and young groups (p=0.718). Overall survival and disease-free survival were not significantly different between the two groups. Advanced age was not independent predictor of overall survival and disease-free survival by univariate and multivariate analysis.

Conclusion: Our data indicate that laparoscopic surgery with radical intent can be performed as safely in elderly patients as in young patients, with comparable postoperative results and long-term outcomes.
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May 2016

A survey of smart water quality monitoring system.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2015 Apr 6;22(7):4893-906. Epub 2015 Jan 6.

Institute of Electronic Information & Technology, Chongqing Institutes of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, China,

The smart water quality monitoring, regarded as the future water quality monitoring technology, catalyzes progress in the capabilities of data collection, communication, data analysis, and early warning. In this article, we survey the literature till 2014 on the enabling technologies for the Smart Water Quality Monitoring System. We explore three major subsystems, namely the data collection subsystem, the data transmission subsystem, and the data management subsystem from the view of data acquiring, data transmission, and data analysis. Specifically, for the data collection subsystem, we explore selection of water quality parameters, existing technology of online water quality monitoring, identification of the locations of sampling stations, and determination of the sampling frequencies. For the data transmission system, we explore data transmission network architecture and data communication management. For the data management subsystem, we explore water quality analysis and prediction, water quality evaluation, and water quality data storage. We also propose possible challenges and future directions for each subsystem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-014-4026-xDOI Listing
April 2015

DNA-directed self-assembling of carbon nanotubes.

J Am Chem Soc 2005 Jan;127(1):14-5

Department of Polymer Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325-0301, USA.

Multicomponent structures were constructed by DNA-directed self-assembling of multiple carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. The work presented here represents an important advance in constructing many multicomponent nanotube structures for multifunctional material and device applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja0446045DOI Listing
January 2005
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