Publications by authors named "Jiangxin Chen"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Isolation of the South China Sea from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre since the latest Miocene due to formation of the Luzon Strait.

Sci Rep 2021 01 15;11(1):1562. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences, Second Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, Hangzhou, 310012, China.

The North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) plays a major role in present global ocean circulation. At times, the gyre has coursed through the South China Sea, but its role in the evolutionary development of that Sea remains uncertain. This work systematically describes a major shift in NPSG paleo-circulation evident from sedimentary features observed in seismic and bathymetric data. These data outline two contourite depositional systems-a buried one formed in the late Miocene, and a latest Miocene to present-day system. The two are divided by a prominent regional discontinuity that represents a major shift in paleo-circulation during the latest Miocene (~ 6.5 Ma). The shift coincides with the further restriction of the South China Sea with respect to the North Pacific due to the formation of the Luzon Strait as a consequence of further northwest movement of the Philippine Sea plate. Before that restriction, data indicate vigorous NPSG circulation in the South China Sea. Semi-closure, however, established a new oceanographic circulation regime in the latest Miocene. This work demonstrates the significant role of recent plate tectonics, gateway development, and marginal seas in the establishment of modern global ocean circulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79941-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7810843PMC
January 2021

Author Correction: Deep-sea Sediment Resuspension by Internal Solitary Waves in the Northern South China Sea.

Sci Rep 2019 Nov 21;9(1):17522. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Laboratory for Marine Geology, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao, 266061, P.R. China.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-53956-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6868124PMC
November 2019

Deep-sea Sediment Resuspension by Internal Solitary Waves in the Northern South China Sea.

Sci Rep 2019 08 20;9(1):12137. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

Laboratory for Marine Geology, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao, 266061, P.R. China.

Internal solitary waves (ISWs) can cause strong vertical and horizontal currents and turbulent mixing in the ocean. These processes affect sediment and pollutant transport, acoustic transmissions and man-made structures in the shallow and deep oceans. Previous studies of the role of ISWs in suspending seafloor sediments and forming marine nepheloid layers were mainly conducted in shallow-water environments. In summer 2017, we observed at least four thick (70-140 m) benthic nepheloid layers (BNLs) at water depths between 956 and 1545 m over continental slopes in the northern South China Sea. We found there was a good correlation between the timing of the ISW packet and variations of the deepwater suspended sediment concentration (SSC). At a depth of 956 m, when the ISW arrived, the near-bottom SSC rapidly increased by two orders of magnitude to 0.62 mg/l at 8 m above the bottom. At two much deeper stations, the ISW-induced horizontal velocity reached 59.6-79.3 cm/s, which was one order of magnitude more than the seafloor contour currents velocity. The SSC, 10 m above the sea floor, rapidly increased to 0.10 mg/l (depth of 1545 m) and 1.25 mg/l (depth of 1252 m). In this study, we found that ISWs could suspend much more sediments on deepwater areas than previously thought. Specifically, we estimated that ISWs could induce and suspend 78.7 Mt/yr of sediment from shelf to deep-sea areas of the northern South China Sea. The total amount of sediment resuspended by shoaling ISWs was 2.7 times that of river-derived sediment reaching the northern South China Sea. This accounted for 6.1% of the global river-discharged sediment (16.4% of that from Asian rivers) transported to the sea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47886-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6702154PMC
August 2019
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