Publications by authors named "Ji Hye Jeon"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Quinoa ( Willd.) Starch and Seeds on the Physicochemical and Textural and Sensory Properties of Chicken Meatballs during Frozen Storage.

Foods 2021 Jul 9;10(7). Epub 2021 Jul 9.

Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Korea.

The effects of starch (corn and quinoa) and quinoa seeds on chicken meatballs' physicochemical, textural, and sensory properties were investigated during frozen storage. The chicken meatballs were prepared with corn starch (CS), quinoa starch (QS), quinoa seeds (Q), and combinations of corn starch and quinoa seeds (CS-Q), and quinoa starch and quinoa seeds (QS-Q), which were subjected to five freeze-thaw (F-T) cycles of temperature fluctuation conditions during frozen storage. Regardless of the type used (CS or QS), adding starch resulted in fewer cooking, drip, and reheating losses in chicken meatballs during frozen storage. The values of the hardness, gumminess, and chewiness of chicken meatballs with CS or QS were half those of chicken meatballs without starch, indicating that the addition of starch inhibited the change in the meatballs' texture. The total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values were progressive but did not dynamically increase during five F-T cycles. Chicken meatballs containing CS-Q or QS-Q showed significantly lower TBARS values than those with CS, QS, or Q after five F-T cycles. Adding quinoa seeds significantly increased the antioxidant activity and the chewiness of meatballs ( < 0.05) compared with starch only. The addition of the combination of QS-Q to chicken meatballs increased the values of taste, texture, and overall acceptability, indicating that quinoa starch and seeds may be introduced as premium ingredients to frozen meat products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10071601DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8303254PMC
July 2021

Cytoplasmic expression of a model antigen with M Cell-Targeting moiety in lactic acid bacteria and implication of the mechanism as a mucosal vaccine via oral route.

Vaccine 2021 07 12;39(30):4072-4081. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Graduate School of International Agricultural Technology, Seoul National University, Pyeongchang-gun 25354, Republic of Korea; Institute of Green-Bio Science & Technology, Seoul National University, Pyeongchang-gun 25354, Republic of Korea; Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely studied as mucosal vaccine delivery carriers against many infectious diseases for heterologous expression of protein antigens. There are three antigen expression strategies for LAB: cytoplasmic expression (CE), cell surface display (SD), and extracellular secretion (ES). Despite the generally higher protein expression level and many observations of antigen-specific immunogenicity in CE, its application as a mucosal vaccine has been overlooked relative to SD and ES because of the antigens enclosed by the LAB cell wall. We hypothesized that the antigens in CE could be released from the LAB into the intestinal lumen before host bacterial access to gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which could contribute to antigen-specific immune responses after oral administration. To elucidate this hypothesis, three recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) strains were constructed to produce a model antigen, BmpB, with or without an M cell-targeting moiety, and their immunogenicities were analyzed comparatively as oral vaccines in mouse model. The data indicated that the recombinant LPs producing BmpBs with different conformations could induce mucosal immunity differentially. This suggests that the cytoplasmic antigens in LAB could be released into the intestinal lumen, subsequently translocated through M cells, and stimulate the GALT to generate antigen-specific immune responses. Therefore, the CE strategy has great potential, especially in the application of oral LAB vaccines as well as SD and ES strategies. This research provides a better understanding of the mechanism for recombinant oral LAB vaccines and gives insight to the future design of LAB vaccines and oral delivery applications for useful therapeutic proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.06.010DOI Listing
July 2021

Evaluation of the Digestibility of Korean Hanwoo Beef Cuts Using the Physicochemical Upper Gastrointestinal System.

Korean J Food Sci Anim Resour 2017 31;37(5):682-689. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

Biomaterials Research Institute, Sahmyook University, Seoul 01792, Korea.

The aim of this study was to investigate the digestibility of different Korean Hanwoo beef cuts using an digestion model, physicochemical upper gastrointestinal system (IPUGS). The four most commonly consumed cuts - tenderloin, sirloin, brisket and flank, and bottom round - were chosen for this study. Beef samples (75 g) were cooked and ingested into IPUGS, which was composed of mouth, esophagus, and stomach, thereby simulating the digestion conditions of humans. Digested samples were collected every 15 min for 4 h of simulation and their pH monitored. Samples were visualized under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to examine changes in the smoothness of the surface after digestion. Analysis of the amino acid composition and molecular weight (MW) of peptides was performed using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. Following proteolysis by the gastric pepsin, beef proteins were digested into peptides. The amount of peptides with higher MW decreased over the course of digestion. SEM results revealed that the surface of the digested samples became visibly smoother. Total indispensable and dispensable amino acids were the highest for the bottom round cut prior to digestion simulation. However, the total amount of indispensable amino acids were maximum for the tenderloin cut after digestion. These results may provide guidelines for the elderly population to choose easily digestible meat cuts and products to improve their nutritional and health status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2017.37.5.682DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5686326PMC
October 2017

Stamping transfer of a quantum dot interlayer for organic photovoltaic cells.

Langmuir 2012 Jun 6;28(25):9893-8. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 Graduate Program), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea.

An organophilic cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dot (QD) interlayer was prepared on the active layer in organic solar cells by a stamping transfer method. The mother substrate composed of a UV-cured film on a polycarbonate film with strong solvent resistance makes it possible to spin-coat QDs on it and dry transfer onto an active layer without damaging the active layer. The QD interlayers have been optimized by controlling the concentration of the QD solution. The coverage of QD particles on the active layer was verified by TEM analysis and fluorescence images. After insertion of the QD interlayer between the active layer and metal cathode, the photovoltaic performances of the organic solar cell were clearly enhanced. By ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of CdSe QDs, it can be anticipated that the CdSe QD interlayer reduces charge recombination by blocking the holes moving to the cathode from the active layer and facilitating efficient collection of the electrons from the active layer to the cathode.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la301477eDOI Listing
June 2012

Infection status of hospitalized diarrheal patients with gastrointestinal protozoa, bacteria, and viruses in the Republic of Korea.

Korean J Parasitol 2010 Jun 17;48(2):113-20. Epub 2010 Jun 17.

Department of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Seoul, Korea.

To understand protozoan, viral, and bacterial infections in diarrheal patients, we analyzed positivity and mixed-infection status with 3 protozoans, 4 viruses, and 10 bacteria in hospitalized diarrheal patients during 2004-2006 in the Republic of Korea. A total of 76,652 stool samples were collected from 96 hospitals across the nation. The positivity for protozoa, viruses, and bacteria was 129, 1,759, and 1,797 per 10,000 persons, respectively. Especially, Cryptosporidium parvum was highly mixed-infected with rotavirus among pediatric diarrheal patients (29.5 per 100 C. parvum positive cases), and Entamoeba histolytica was mixed-infected with Clostridium perfringens (10.3 per 100 E. histolytica positive cases) in protozoan-diarrheal patients. Those infected with rotavirus and C. perfringens constituted relatively high proportions among mixed infection cases from January to April. The positivity for rotavirus among viral infection for those aged < or = 5 years was significantly higher, while C. perfringens among bacterial infection was higher for > or = 50 years. The information for association of viral and bacterial infections with enteropathogenic protozoa in diarrheal patients may contribute to improvement of care for diarrhea as well as development of control strategies for diarrheal diseases in Korea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.2010.48.2.113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892565PMC
June 2010

A new DNA building block, 4'-selenothymidine: synthesis and modification to 4'-seleno-AZT as a potential anti-HIV agent.

Org Lett 2010 May;12(10):2242-5

Department of Bioinspired Science and Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea.

The first synthesis of 4'-selenothymidine (1), a novel DNA building block, and 4'-seleno-AZT (2) was accomplished from 2-deoxy-d-ribose via stereoselective formation of 2-deoxy-4-seleno-d-furanose 17 and a Pummerer-type base condensation as key steps. 4'-Selenothymidine (1) was discovered to adopt the same 2'-endo/3'-exo conformation as thymidine, which is unusual in that 4'-selenouridine has the opposite conformation to that of uridine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ol1005906DOI Listing
May 2010
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