Publications by authors named "Ji Ae Jeong"

4 Publications

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Dual mechanisms diminishing tonic GABAA inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells in Noda epileptic rats.

J Neurophysiol 2013 Jul 10;110(1):95-102. Epub 2013 Apr 10.

Department of Physiology, School of Medicine and Brain Research Institute, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea.

The Noda epileptic rat (NER), a Wistar colony mutant, spontaneously has tonic-clonic convulsions with paroxysmal discharges. In the present study, we measured phasic and tonic γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) current (I tonic) in NER hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells and compared the results with those of normal parent strain Wistar rats (WIS). I tonic, revealed by a bicuculline-induced outward shift in holding current, was significantly smaller in NER than in WIS (P < 0.01). The frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) was also significantly lower in NER than in WIS (P < 0.05), without significant differences in the IPSC amplitude or decay time between WIS and NER. I tonic attenuation in NER was further confirmed in the presence of GABA transporter blockers, NO-711 and nipecotic acid, with no difference in neuronal GABA transporter expression between WIS and NER. I tonic responses to extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonists (THIP and DS-2) were significantly reduced in NER compared with WIS (P < 0.05). Allopregnanolone caused less I tonic increase in NER than in WIS, while it prolonged the IPSC decay time to a similar rate in the two groups. Expression of the GABAA receptor δ-subunit was decreased in the dentate gyrus of NER relative to that of WIS. Taken together, our results showed that a combination of attenuated presynaptic GABA release and extrasynaptic GABAA receptor expression reduced I tonic amplitude and its sensitivity to neurosteroids, which likely diminishes the gating function of dentate gyrus granule cells and renders NER more susceptible to seizure propagation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.00727.2012DOI Listing
July 2013

Mycobacterium kansasii-induced death of murine macrophages involves endoplasmic reticulum stress responses mediated by reactive oxygen species generation or calpain activation.

Apoptosis 2013 Feb;18(2):150-9

Department of Microbiology, Infection Signaling Network Research Center, Research Institute for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747, South Korea.

Although pathogenic mechanisms of tuberculosis have been extensively studied, little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of Mycobacterium kansasii. In this work the influence of virulence and ER-stress mediated apoptosis of macrophages during two different strains of M. kansasii infection was investigated. We show that M. kansasii infection is associated with ER stress-mediated apoptosis in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Infection of RAW 264.7 cells in vitro with apoptosis-inducing a clinical isolate of M. kansasii SM-1 (SM-1) resulted in strong induction of ER stress responses compared with M. kansasii type strain (ATCC 12478)-infected RAW 264.7 cells. Interestingly, inhibition of calpain prevented the induction of CHOP and Bip in ATCC 12478-infected RAW 264.7 cells but not in RAW 264.7 cells infected with SM-1. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly increased only in RAW 264.7 cells infected with SM-1. We propose that ROS generation is important for triggering ER stress-mediated apoptosis during SM-1 infection, whereas ATCC 12478-induced, ER stress-mediated apoptosis is associated with calpain activation. Our results demonstrate that the ER stress pathway plays important roles in the pathogenesis of M. kansasii infections, and that different strains of M. kansasii induce different patterns of ER stress-mediated apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10495-012-0792-4DOI Listing
February 2013

Neurosteroid modulation of benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA tonic inhibition in supraoptic magnocellular neurons.

Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2011 Jun 30;300(6):R1578-87. Epub 2011 Mar 30.

Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Korea.

Interactions between neurosteroids and GABA receptors have attracted particular attention in the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Although GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) mediate a sustained tonic inhibitory current (I(tonic)), as well as conventional phasic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs, I(phasic)) in the SON, whether the steroid modulation on I(tonic) is present in SON magnocelluar neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is unknown. Here, we addressed this question and gained insights into the potential molecular configuration of GABA(A) receptors mediating I(tonic) and conferring its neurosteroids sensitivity in SON MNCs. 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol (THIP) (1 μM), a relatively selective extrasynaptic GABA(A)R agonist, facilitated I(tonic) without affecting the main characteristics of IPSCs, while DS-2, a relatively selective modulator of GABA(A)R δ-subunits, caused minimal changes in I(tonic) of SON MNCs. l-655,708, a relatively selective GABA(A)R α(5)-subunit inverse agonist, blocked ∼35% of the total I(tonic) both under basal and elevated ambient GABA concentration (3 μM). Facilitation of I(tonic) by benzodiazepines further supported the role of GABA(A)R γ(2)-subunit in I(tonic) of SON MNCs. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed much lesser expression of GABA(A)R δ-subunit than the α(5) or γ(2)-subunit in the SON. Allopregnanolone and 3α,5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone increased both I(tonic) and I(phasic) in SON MNCs, respectively, although more than 90% of the current increase was mediated by I(tonic) during the neurosteroid facilitation. Finally, l-655,708 attenuated the neurosteroid facilitation of I(tonic) but not of I(phasic). Altogether, our results suggest that I(tonic), mediated mainly by benzodiazepine-sensitive GABA(A)Rs containing α(5)-, β-, and γ(2)-, and to a lesser extent, δ-subunits, is a potential target of neurosteroid modulation in SON neurons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00627.2010DOI Listing
June 2011

Major role of GABA(A)-receptor mediated tonic inhibition in propofol suppression of supraoptic magnocellular neurons.

Neurosci Lett 2011 Apr 3;494(2):119-23. Epub 2011 Mar 3.

Department of Physiology, Brain Research Institute, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, 6 Munhwa-Dong, Joong-Gu, Daejeon 301-131, Republic of Korea.

Using slice patch clamp recording, we examined the effects of general anesthetic propofol (2,6-diisoprophlphenol) on dual modality of GABA(A) inhibition in supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs): conventional quantal synaptic transmission (IPSCs, I(phasic)) and persistent tonic form of inhibitory current (I(tonic)). Propofol (10 μM) enhanced I(tonic) as shown by an inward shift in I(holding) (16.46±2.93 pA, n=27) and RMS increase (from 3.37±0.21 pA to 4.68±0.33 pA, n=27) in SON MNCs. Propofol also prolonged the decay time of IPSCs with decreased IPSCs frequency but no significant changes in IPSCs amplitude. Overall, propofol (1-10 μM) caused much smaller increase in mean I(phasic) than mean I(tonic) at all tested concentrations. In consistent with the enhancement of GABA(A) currents, propofol attenuated ongoing firing activities of SON MNCs by ∼65% of control. Selective inhibition of I(phasic) by a GABA(A) antagonist, gabazine (1 μM), failed to block the propofol suppression of the firing activities, while inhibition of I(tonic) and I(phasic) by bicuculline (20 μM) efficiently blocked the propofol-induced neurodepression in SON MNCs. Taken together, our results showed that propofol facilitated I(tonic) with marginal increase in mean I(phasic), and this could be a mechanism reducing the intrinsic SON MNCs excitability during propofol anesthesia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2011.02.072DOI Listing
April 2011