Publications by authors named "Jessie Uehling"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microfluidics and Metabolomics Reveal Symbiotic Bacterial-Fungal Interactions Between and Include Metabolite Exchange.

Front Microbiol 2019 1;10:2163. Epub 2019 Oct 1.

Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.

We identified two poplar ( sp.)-associated microbes, the fungus, strain AG77, and the bacterium, strain BT03, that mutually promote each other's growth. Using culture assays in concert with a novel microfluidic device to generate time-lapse videos, we found growth specific media differing in pH and pre-conditioned by microbial growth led to increased fungal and bacterial growth rates. Coupling microfluidics and comparative metabolomics data results indicated that observed microbial growth stimulation involves metabolic exchange during two ordered events. The first is an emission of fungal metabolites, including organic acids used or modified by bacteria. A second signal of unknown nature is produced by bacteria which increases fungal growth rates. We find this symbiosis is initiated in part by metabolic exchange involving fungal organic acids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.02163DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6779839PMC
October 2019

Increasing access to microfluidics for studying fungi and other branched biological structures.

Fungal Biol Biotechnol 2019 10;6. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

1Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS 6445, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.

Background: Microfluidic systems are well-suited for studying mixed biological communities for improving industrial processes of fermentation, biofuel production, and pharmaceutical production. The results of which have the potential to resolve the underlying mechanisms of growth and transport in these complex branched living systems. Microfluidics provide controlled environments and improved optical access for real-time and high-resolution imaging studies that allow high-content and quantitative analyses. Studying growing branched structures and the dynamics of cellular interactions with both biotic and abiotic cues provides context for molecule production and genetic manipulations. To make progress in this arena, technical and logistical barriers must be overcome to more effectively deploy microfluidics in biological disciplines. A principle technical barrier is the process of assembling, sterilizing, and hydrating the microfluidic system; the lack of the necessary equipment for the preparatory process is a contributing factor to this barrier. To improve access to microfluidic systems, we present the development, characterization, and implementation of a microfluidics assembly and packaging process that builds on self-priming point-of-care principles to achieve "ready-to-use microfluidics."

Results: We present results from domestic and international collaborations using novel microfluidic architectures prepared with a unique packaging protocol. We implement this approach by focusing primarily on filamentous fungi; we also demonstrate the utility of this approach for collaborations on plants and neurons. In this work we (1) determine the shelf-life of ready-to-use microfluidics, (2) demonstrate biofilm-like colonization on fungi, (3) describe bacterial motility on fungal hyphae (fungal highway), (4) report material-dependent bacterial-fungal colonization, (5) demonstrate germination of vacuum-sealed seeds in microfluidics stored for up to 2 weeks, and (6) observe bidirectional cytoplasmic streaming in fungi.

Conclusions: This pre-packaging approach provides a simple, one step process to initiate microfluidics in any setting for fungal studies, bacteria-fungal interactions, and other biological inquiries. This process improves access to microfluidics for controlling biological microenvironments, and further enabling visual and quantitative analysis of fungal cultures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40694-019-0071-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6556955PMC
June 2019

Megaphylogeny resolves global patterns of mushroom evolution.

Nat Ecol Evol 2019 04 18;3(4):668-678. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary.

Mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) have the greatest morphological diversity and complexity of any group of fungi. They have radiated into most niches and fulfil diverse roles in the ecosystem, including wood decomposers, pathogens or mycorrhizal mutualists. Despite the importance of mushroom-forming fungi, large-scale patterns of their evolutionary history are poorly known, in part due to the lack of a comprehensive and dated molecular phylogeny. Here, using multigene and genome-based data, we assemble a 5,284-species phylogenetic tree and infer ages and broad patterns of speciation/extinction and morphological innovation in mushroom-forming fungi. Agaricomycetes started a rapid class-wide radiation in the Jurassic, coinciding with the spread of (sub)tropical coniferous forests and a warming climate. A possible mass extinction, several clade-specific adaptive radiations and morphological diversification of fruiting bodies followed during the Cretaceous and the Paleogene, convergently giving rise to the classic toadstool morphology, with a cap, stalk and gills (pileate-stipitate morphology). This morphology is associated with increased rates of lineage diversification, suggesting it represents a key innovation in the evolution of mushroom-forming fungi. The increase in mushroom diversity started during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic radiation event, an era of humid climate when terrestrial communities dominated by gymnosperms and reptiles were also expanding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-0834-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6443077PMC
April 2019

Genome-based estimates of fungal rDNA copy number variation across phylogenetic scales and ecological lifestyles.

Mol Ecol 2019 02 6;28(4):721-730. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) copy number variation (CNV) has major physiological implications for all organisms, but how it varies for fungi, an ecologically ubiquitous and important group of microorganisms, has yet to be systemically investigated. Here, we examine rDNA CNV using an in silico read depth approach for 91 fungal taxa with sequenced genomes and assess copy number conservation across phylogenetic scales and ecological lifestyles. rDNA copy number varied considerably across fungi, ranging from an estimated 14 to 1,442 copies (mean = 113, median = 82), and copy number similarity was inversely correlated with phylogenetic distance. No correlations were found between rDNA CNV and fungal trophic mode, ecological guild or genome size. Taken together, these results show that like other microorganisms, fungi exhibit substantial variation in rDNA copy number, which is linked to their phylogeny in a scale-dependent manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14995DOI Listing
February 2019

Emission Factors of Microbial Volatile Organic Compounds from Environmental Bacteria and Fungi.

Environ Sci Technol 2018 08 13;52(15):8272-8282. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Department of Biology , Duke University , Durham , North Carolina 27708 , United States.

Knowledge of the factors controlling the diverse chemical emissions of common environmental bacteria and fungi is crucial because they are important signal molecules for these microbes that also could influence humans. We show here not only a high diversity of mVOCs but that their abundance can differ greatly in different environmental contexts. Microbial volatiles exhibit dynamic changes across microbial growth phases, resulting in variance of composition and emission rate of species-specific and generic mVOCs. In vitro experiments documented emissions of a wide range of mVOCs (>400 different chemicals) at high time resolution from diverse microbial species grown under different controlled conditions on nutrient media, or residential structural materials ( N = 54, N = 23). Emissions of mVOCs varied not only between microbial taxa at a given condition but also as a function of life stage and substrate type. We quantify emission factors for total and specific mVOCs normalized for respiration rates to account for the microbial activity during their stationary phase. Our VOC measurements of different microbial taxa indicate that a variety of factors beyond temperature and water activity, such as substrate type, microbial symbiosis, growth phase, and lifecycle affect the magnitude and composition of mVOC emission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.8b00806DOI Listing
August 2018

Bacterial-fungal interactions: ecology, mechanisms and challenges.

FEMS Microbiol Rev 2018 05;42(3):335-352

Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.

Fungi and bacteria are found living together in a wide variety of environments. Their interactions are significant drivers of many ecosystem functions and are important for the health of plants and animals. A large number of fungal and bacterial families engage in complex interactions that lead to critical behavioural shifts of the microorganisms ranging from mutualism to antagonism. The importance of bacterial-fungal interactions (BFI) in environmental science, medicine and biotechnology has led to the emergence of a dynamic and multidisciplinary research field that combines highly diverse approaches including molecular biology, genomics, geochemistry, chemical and microbial ecology, biophysics and ecological modelling. In this review, we discuss recent advances that underscore the roles of BFI across relevant habitats and ecosystems. A particular focus is placed on the understanding of BFI within complex microbial communities and in regard of the metaorganism concept. We also discuss recent discoveries that clarify the (molecular) mechanisms involved in bacterial-fungal relationships, and the contribution of new technologies to decipher generic principles of BFI in terms of physical associations and molecular dialogues. Finally, we discuss future directions for research in order to stimulate synergy within the BFI research area and to resolve outstanding questions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsre/fuy008DOI Listing
May 2018

Do fungi have an innate immune response? An NLR-based comparison to plant and animal immune systems.

PLoS Pathog 2017 10 26;13(10):e1006578. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

Institut de Biologie et Génétique Cellulaire, UMR 5095 CNRS et Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1006578DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5658179PMC
October 2017

Integrated proteomics and metabolomics suggests symbiotic metabolism and multimodal regulation in a fungal-endobacterial system.

Environ Microbiol 2017 03 30;19(3):1041-1053. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

Many plant-associated fungi host endosymbiotic endobacteria with reduced genomes. While endobacteria play important roles in these tri-partite plant-fungal-endobacterial systems, the active physiology of fungal endobacteria has not been characterized extensively by systems biology approaches. Here, we use integrated proteomics and metabolomics to characterize the relationship between the endobacterium Mycoavidus sp. and the root-associated fungus Mortierella elongata. In nitrogen-poor media, M. elongata had decreased growth but hosted a large and growing endobacterial population. The active endobacterium likely extracted malate from the fungal host as the primary carbon substrate for energy production and biosynthesis of phospho-sugars, nucleobases, peptidoglycan and some amino acids. The endobacterium obtained nitrogen by importing a variety of nitrogen-containing compounds. Further, nitrogen limitation significantly perturbed the carbon and nitrogen flows in the fungal metabolic network. M. elongata regulated many pathways by concordant changes on enzyme abundances, post-translational modifications, reactant concentrations and allosteric effectors. Such multimodal regulations may be a general mechanism for metabolic modulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.13605DOI Listing
March 2017

A phylum-level phylogenetic classification of zygomycete fungi based on genome-scale data.

Mycologia 2016 09;108(5):1028-1046

Department of Plant Pathology & Microbiology and Institute for Integrative Genome Biology, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, California 92521.

Zygomycete fungi were classified as a single phylum, Zygomycota, based on sexual reproduction by zygospores, frequent asexual reproduction by sporangia, absence of multicellular sporocarps, and production of coenocytic hyphae, all with some exceptions. Molecular phylogenies based on one or a few genes did not support the monophyly of the phylum, however, and the phylum was subsequently abandoned. Here we present phylogenetic analyses of a genome-scale data set for 46 taxa, including 25 zygomycetes and 192 proteins, and we demonstrate that zygomycetes comprise two major clades that form a paraphyletic grade. A formal phylogenetic classification is proposed herein and includes two phyla, six subphyla, four classes and 16 orders. On the basis of these results, the phyla Mucoromycota and Zoopagomycota are circumscribed. Zoopagomycota comprises Entomophtoromycotina, Kickxellomycotina and Zoopagomycotina; it constitutes the earliest diverging lineage of zygomycetes and contains species that are primarily parasites and pathogens of small animals (e.g. amoeba, insects, etc.) and other fungi, i.e. mycoparasites. Mucoromycota comprises Glomeromycotina, Mortierellomycotina, and Mucoromycotina and is sister to Dikarya. It is the more derived clade of zygomycetes and mainly consists of mycorrhizal fungi, root endophytes, and decomposers of plant material. Evolution of trophic modes, morphology, and analysis of genome-scale data are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/16-042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6078412PMC
September 2016

New Boletaceae taxa from Guyana: Binderoboletus segoi gen. and sp. nov., Guyanaporus albipodus gen. and sp. nov., Singerocomus rubriflavus gen. and sp. nov., and a new combination for Xerocomus inundabilis.

Mycologia 2016 Jan-Feb;108(1):157-73. Epub 2015 Oct 21.

Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.

Binderoboletus segoi gen. and sp. nov., Guyanaporus albipodus gen. and sp. nov. and Singerocomus rubriflavus gen. and sp. nov. (Boletaceae, Boletales, Basidiomycota) are described from the Pakaraima Mountains and adjacent lowlands of Guyana. Xerocomus inundabilis, originally described from the central Brazilian Amazon and based solely on the type collection, is redescribed from numerous collections from Guyana and transferred into Singerocomus. These boletes occur in Neotropical forests dominated by ectomycorrhizal trees in the genera Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae), Aldina (Fabaceae subfam. Papilionoideae) and Pakaraimaea (Dipterocarpaceae). Three of the species were repeatedly found in a multiyear sporocarp survey in Dicymbe corymbosa-monodominant forest. Macromorphological, micromorphological, habitat and multilocus DNA sequence data are provided for each species. A molecular phylogenetic analysis based on a large taxon set across the Boletaceae justifies erection of the new genera.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/15-075DOI Listing
May 2016

Sarcodon in the Neotropics I: new species from Guyana, Puerto Rico and Belize.

Mycologia 2015 May-Jun;107(3):591-606. Epub 2015 Feb 6.

Department of Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521

Four species of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) genus Sarcodon (Bankeraceae, Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) are described as new to science. Sarcodon pakaraimensis sp. nov. is described from forests dominated by the ECM trees Pakaraimaea dipterocarpacea (Dipterocarpaceae) and Dicymbe jenmanii (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae) in the Pakaraima Mountains of Guyana. Sarcodon portoricensis sp. nov. is described from lower montane wet forest within the El Yunque National Forest of Puerto Rico. Sarcodon quercophilus sp. nov. and Sarcodon umbilicatus sp. nov. are described from Quercus (Fagaceae) cloud forests within the Maya Mountains of Belize. The discovery of these species is significant given that the majority of the approximately 87 described Sarcodon species are north temperate or boreal in distribution and frequently associate with coniferous host plants; these constitute the most recent records for Sarcodon from the greater Neotropics. Each of the new species is morphologically consistent with accepted diagnostic characters for Sarcodon: pileate-stipitate stature, a dentate hymenophore, determinate basidiomatal development, fleshy, non-zonate context and brown, tuberculate basidiospores. DNA (ITS) sequence analysis corroborated the generic placement of S. pakaraimensis, S. portoricensis, S. quercophilus and S. umbilicatus and, along with morphological differences, supported their recognition as distinct species. Macromorphological, micromorphological, habitat and DNA sequence data from the nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) are provided for each of the new species. A key to Neotropical Sarcodon species and similar extralimital taxa is provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/14-185DOI Listing
August 2015

Fungal biology: compiling genomes and exploiting them.

New Phytol 2014 Jul;203(2):359-61

Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6422, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.12891DOI Listing
July 2014

Cantharellaceae of Guyana II: new species of Craterellus, new South American distribution records for Cantharellus guyanensis and Craterellus excelsus, and a key to the Neotropical taxa.

Mycologia 2014 Mar-Apr;106(2):307-24

Department of Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521.

Craterellus olivaceoluteus sp. nov. and Craterellus cinereofimbriatus sp. nov. are described as new to science. These fungi were collected from Guyana in association with ectomycorrhizal host trees in the genera Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae) and Pakaraimaea (Dipterocarpaceae). Cantharellus guyanensis Mont., originally described from French Guiana, is redescribed from recent collections from Guyana, with additional range extensions for the species provided based on material examined from French Guiana, Venezuela, and north central, northeastern and southern Brazil, circumscribing nearly the entire Guiana Shield region and beyond. A new distribution record from French Guiana is provided for Craterellus excelsus T.W. Henkel & Aime. Macromorphological, micromorphological and habitat data are provided for the new species and C. guyanensis as well as DNA sequence data from the nuclear ribosomal regions of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S large subunit (LSU); additional sequence data is provided for C. guyanensis and C. excelsus specimens collected outside Guyana. The relationships of these taxa within the Cantharellaceae were evaluated with phylogenetic analyses of ITS and LSU sequence data. This work brings the total number of Cantharellaceae species known from Guyana to eight. A key to the Cantharellus and Craterellus species known from the lowland Neotropics and extralimital montane Central and South America is provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/106.2.307DOI Listing
July 2014

The ectomycorrhizal fungal community in a neotropical forest dominated by the endemic dipterocarp Pakaraimaea dipterocarpacea.

PLoS One 2013 31;8(1):e55160. Epub 2013 Jan 31.

Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) plants and fungi can be diverse and abundant in certain tropical ecosystems. For example, the primarily paleotropical ECM plant family Dipterocarpaceae is one of the most speciose and ecologically important tree families in Southeast Asia. Pakaraimaea dipterocarpacea is one of two species of dipterocarp known from the Neotropics, and is also the only known member of the monotypic Dipterocarpaceae subfamily Pakaraimoideae. This Guiana Shield endemic is only known from the sandstone highlands of Guyana and Venezuela. Despite its unique phylogenetic position and unusual geographical distribution, the ECM fungal associations of P. dipterocarpacea are understudied throughout the tree's range. In December 2010 we sampled ECM fungi on roots of P. dipterocarpacea and the co-occurring ECM tree Dicymbe jenmanii (Fabaceae subfamily Caesalpinioideae) in the Upper Mazaruni River Basin of Guyana. Based on ITS rDNA sequencing we documented 52 ECM species from 11 independent fungal lineages. Due to the phylogenetic distance between the two host tree species, we hypothesized that P. dipterocarpacea would harbor unique ECM fungi not found on the roots of D. jenmanii. Although statistical tests suggested that several ECM fungal species did exhibit host preferences for either P. dipterocarpacea or D. jenmanii, most of the ECM fungi were multi-host generalists. We also detected several ECM fungi that have never been found in long-term studies of nearby rainforests dominated by other Dicymbe species. One particular mushroom-forming fungus appears to be unique and may represent a new ECM lineage of Agaricales that is endemic to the Neotropics.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0055160PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561384PMC
July 2013

New species and distribution records for Clavulina (Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) from the Guiana Shield, with a key to the lowland neotropical taxa.

Fungal Biol 2012 Dec 7;116(12):1263-74. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

Department of Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521, USA.

Three new and one previously described species of Clavulina (Clavulinaceae, Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) are reported from the central Guiana Shield region from tropical rainforests dominated by ectomycorrhizal trees of the leguminous genus Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae). We provide morphological, DNA sequence, habitat, and fruiting occurrence data for each species. The new species conform to a generic concept of Clavulina that includes coralloid, branched basidiomata with amphigenous hymenia, basidia with two or 2-4 incurved sterigmata and postpartal septa present or absent, and smooth, hyaline, guttulate basidiospores. Placements of the new species in Clavulina were corroborated with DNA sequence data from the internal transcribed spacer and large subunit of the nuclear ribosomal repeat, and their infrageneric relationships were examined with phylogenetic analyses based on DNA from the region coding for the second largest subunit of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (rpb2). To facilitate future studies of the genus in the neotropics, a key is provided for all Clavulina species described from the lowland neotropics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2012.09.004DOI Listing
December 2012

Scaling up: examining the macroecology of ectomycorrhizal fungi.

Mol Ecol 2012 Sep;21(17):4151-4

Department of Biology, Lewis & Clark College, Portland, OR 97202, USA.

Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi play major ecological roles in temperate and tropical ecosystems. Although the richness of ECM fungal communities and the factors controlling their structure have been documented at local spatial scales, how they vary at larger spatial scales remains unclear. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Tedersoo et al. (2012) present the results of a meta-analysis of ECM fungal community structure that sheds important new light on global-scale patterns. Using data from 69 study systems and 6021 fungal species, the researchers found that ECM fungal richness does not fit the classic latitudinal diversity gradient in which species richness peaks at lower latitudes. Instead, richness of ECM fungal communities has a unimodal relationship with latitude that peaks in temperate zones. Intriguingly, this conclusion suggests the mechanisms driving ECM fungal community richness may differ from those of many other organisms, including their plant hosts. Future research will be key to determine the robustness of this pattern and to examine the processes that generate and maintain global-scale gradients of ECM fungal richness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2012.05703.xDOI Listing
September 2012

Membranomyces species are common ectomycorrhizal symbionts in Northern Hemisphere forests.

Mycorrhiza 2012 Oct 31;22(7):577-81. Epub 2012 Jul 31.

Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

Membranomyces (Clavulinaceae, Cantharellales) Jülich consists of two described species of resupinate (crust-like) basidiomycetes. Previous studies indicated that Membranomyces falls within the Clavulinaceae, but the phylogenetic position of the genus has not been fully resolved. Membranomyces species were thought to be saprotrophic until 2003 when Tedersoo et al. detected Membranomyces delectabilis on ectomycorrhizal roots of Populus and Picea. Membranomyces was previously known only from collections made in eastern Canada and Europe. We recently sequenced the ITS rDNA barcode region from Scandinavian herbarium specimens identified as M. delectabilis and Membranomyces spurius. Phylogenetic analyses of these sporocarp sequences and similar environmental sequences indicated that Membranomyces is more diverse than previously thought and forms ectomycorrhizas with hosts from a diverse range of plant families in many north temperate ecosystems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-012-0457-8DOI Listing
October 2012

New species of Clavulina (Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) with resupinate and effused basidiomata from the Guiana Shield.

Mycologia 2012 Mar-Apr;104(2):547-56. Epub 2011 Nov 8.

Department of Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521, USA.

Three new species of Clavulina (Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) are described from rainforests dominated by ectomycorrhizal trees of the leguminous genus Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae) from the central Guiana Shield. Species of Clavulina typically form branched, coralloid basidiomata with amphigenous hymenia. However, the three species described here form resupinate or effuso-coralloid basidiomata, macromorphological forms previously unknown in Clavulina. Macromorphological, micromorphological, habitat and DNA sequence data are provided for each new species. Micromorphological features and DNA sequence data from the second largest subunit of DNA-dependant RNA polymerase II (rpb2) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (28S) of the ribosomal repeat justify placement of these new species in Clavulina. Comparisons with described Clavulina species and other resupinate taxa within the Cantharellales are provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/11-130DOI Listing
July 2013

New species and distribution records of Clavulina (Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) from the Guiana Shield.

Mycologia 2011 Jul-Aug;103(4):883-94. Epub 2011 Jan 24.

Department of Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA.

Two new species of Clavulina Schroet. (Clavulinaceae, Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) and new distribution records for Clavulina amazonensis Corner and Clavulina sprucei (Berk.) Corner are described from the Pakaraima Mountains of Guyana, in the central Guiana Shield region. These fungi occur in rainforests dominated by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) trees of the leguminous genus Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae). Macromorphological, micromorphological and habitat data are provided for each species. Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region and 28S subunit were obtained for new species and from representative collections of C. amazonensis and C. sprucei. The two new species, Clavulina kunmudlutsa sp. nov. and Clavulina tepurumenga sp. nov., constitute important edible fungi for the Patamona Amerindians. Our specimens of C. sprucei represent the first reports of the species since 1853 as well as a range extension of nearly 1500 km, while sequence data from basidiomata as well as ECM roots suggest that this taxon consists of a cryptic species complex.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/10-355DOI Listing
September 2011