Publications by authors named "Jessica M Davis"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of Zn, Cu, and Se Levels in the North American Autism Spectrum Disorder Population.

Front Mol Neurosci 2021 29;14:665686. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Divisions of Nuclear Medicine and Research, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.

Metal ion dyshomeostasis and disparate levels of biometals like zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and selenium (Se) have been implicated as a potential causative factor for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In this study, we have enrolled 129 children (aged 2-4 years) in North America, of which 64 children had a diagnosis of ASD and 65 were controls. Hair, nail, and blood samples were collected and quantitatively analyzed for Zn, Cu and Se using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Of the analyzed biometals, serum Se (116.83 ± 14.84 mcg/mL) was found to be significantly lower in male ASD cases compared to male healthy controls (128.21 ± 9.11 mcg/mL; < 0.005). A similar trend was found for nail Se levels in ASD (1.01 ± 0.15 mcg/mL) versus that of controls (1.11 ± 0.17 mcg/mL) with a -value of 0.0132 using a stratified Wilcoxon rank sum testing. The level of Se in ASD cohort was co-analyzed for psychometric correlation and found a negative correlation between total ADOS score and serum Se levels. However, we did not observe any significant difference in Zn, Cu, and Zn/Cu ratio in ASD cases versus controls in this cohort of North American children. Further studies are recommended to better understand the biology of the relationship between Se and ASD status.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnmol.2021.665686DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8116541PMC
April 2021

A Critical Examination of Community Engagement as a Practice to Foster Leadership.

New Dir Stud Leadersh 2020 12;2020(168):63-73

Virginia Tech.

The authors of this chapter describe how leadership educators can create community engagement experiences to foster student leadership. The authors center social justice, critical race theory, and trauma informed practices in order to advocate for justice and equity with communities and students.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/yd.20409DOI Listing
December 2020

Genetic Testing Practices of Genetic Counselors, Geneticists, and Pediatric Neurologists With Regard to Childhood-Onset Neurogenetic Conditions.

J Child Neurol 2019 03 4;34(4):177-183. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Genetic Counseling Program, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX, USA.

Identifying genetic diagnoses for neurologic conditions with a considerable hereditary component, such as autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and epilepsy, is critical to providing proper medical management for patients and their families. However, many patients with these conditions are not tested appropriately or receive no genetic testing at all. The current study was designed to characterize the genetic testing practices of the providers most likely to evaluate or order genetic testing for these patients: pediatric neurologists, geneticists, and genetic counselors. Significant variance was present between testing strategies selected by pediatric neurologists and those by geneticists and genetic counselors, supporting the need for updated genetic testing guidelines that are consistent across specialties. Pediatric neurologists also report lower confidence in ordering genetic testing and desire further education regarding genetic testing. Together, these results propose that continued integration of genetics providers, such as genetic counselors, into pediatric neurology clinics may improve utilization of genetic testing while reducing the burden on pediatric neurologists.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073818821036DOI Listing
March 2019

Evaluation of a Test Dose Strategy for Pharmacokinetically-Guided Busulfan Dosing for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 02 19;25(2):391-397. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Department of Pharmacy, UNC Hospitals and Clinics, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address:

Targeted busulfan dosing helps limit chemotherapy-related toxicity and optimize disease outcomes in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The objective of this study was to evaluate busulfan exposure from a pharmacokinetic (PK)-guided dosing strategy using a test dose. This retrospective evaluation included adult patients who underwent HCT at our institution with busulfan-based myeloablative (>9 mg/kg) conditioning between January 2014 and October 2015. A weight-based test dose of 0.8 mg/kg was used with PK assessments to predict area under the curve (AUC) achieved with weight-based dosing, with a target AUC of 4800 µM*minute (AUC). PK from the test dose was then used to calculate a PK-guided first myeloablative busulfan dose. PK assessments were also done after the first dose to assess if the goal area under the curve (AUC) had been achieved (AUC). A PK-guided first dose resulted in achievement of target AUC with target ranges of ±10% in 50% of patients, ±15% in 75%, and ±20% in 94%. This was an improved rate of target achievement compared with the 33%, 44%, and 63% of patients who achieved the desired AUC for these respective target ranges when using weight-based dosing (P = .12, .004, and <.001, respectively). The PK-guided strategy also decreased the variability of AUC from 3.6-fold in AUC from the weight-based test doses (2700.8 to 9631 µM*minute; SD, 1211.6 µM*minute) to 1.8-fold in AUC from the PK-guided first doses (3672.1 to 6609.8 µM*minute; SD, 574.7 µM*minute). This reflects a 2-fold improvement in AUC variability with a PK-guided dosing strategy. This is also improved from the 3-fold variability in AUC reported in other studies. Weight and body surface area were significantly associated with the likelihood of AUC being within the ±10% target range (P = .04 for both associations). There was no significant association between AUC and death, relapse, or a composite of the two. These results demonstrate a significant improvement in target AUC attainment and less interpatient variability with PK-guided dosing using a test dose strategy compared with weight-based dosing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.09.017DOI Listing
February 2019

Attitudes of Individuals with Gaucher Disease toward Substrate Reduction Therapies.

J Genet Couns 2018 02 13;27(1):169-176. Epub 2017 Aug 13.

Genetic Counseling Program, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX, USA.

Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Previously, treatment for GD was limited to intravenous enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs). More recently, oral substrate reduction therapies (SRTs) were approved for treatment of GD. Although both therapies alleviate disease symptoms, attitudes toward SRTs and patient perceptions of health while using SRT have not been well established. Electronic surveys were administered to adults with GD and asked about treatment history, attitudes toward SRTs, and perception of health while using SRTs as compared to ERTs, if applicable to the participant. ERT users that were offered treatment with SRTs cited potential side effects, wanting more research on SRTs, and satisfaction with their current treatment regimen as reasons for declining SRTs. SRT users expressed convenience and less invasiveness as reasons for choosing SRTs. Additionally, those using SRTs most often perceived their health to be similar to when they previously used ERT. Participant responses illustrate that attitudes toward SRTs can be variable and that one particular treatment may not be ideal for all patients with GD depending on individual perceptions of factors such as convenience, invasiveness, or side effects. Thus, individuals with GD should be counseled adequately by healthcare providers about both ERTs and SRTs for treatment of GD now that SRTs are clinically available.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-017-0137-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5794801PMC
February 2018

Recurrent headache in military-dependent children and the impact of parent deployment.

Mil Med 2013 Mar;178(3):274-8

Department of Pediatrics, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA.

Our objective is to determine the prevalence of recurrent headaches in military-dependent children and to study the changes in headache frequency, severity, and duration during a parental deployment. Recurrent headaches are common in children and are often intensified by stressful life events. Military-dependent children are subjected to unique stressors, most significantly parental wartime deployment. No studies have evaluated the effect of deployment on somatic complaints, to include headaches. We conducted a parental, cross-sectional questionnaire-based study in patients aged 5 to 17 years who were seen in the pediatric or adolescent clinics at a regional military medical center. The overall prevalence of recurrent headaches in the preceding 12 months was 30%. Almost half reported headache worsening in frequency, severity, or duration over the previous 12 months, whether a parent was deployed or not. For children who had experienced parental deployment, younger children and females were affected more often. Younger females had the highest rates of headache worsening. This trend may indicate a more detrimental effect of parental deployment on childhood headache in certain populations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-12-00171DOI Listing
March 2013

Small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TNF and TNFR.

Future Med Chem 2013 Jan;5(1):69-79

Fairfield University, 173 North Benson Road, Fairfield, CT 06824, USA.

The overexpression of TNF has been implicated in a variety of disease conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, HIV and cancer. It is presently a therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. Many of the therapeutics currently used are biologics designed to sequester TNF, preventing it from binding with its receptors. Recent research has been focused on finding small molecules that alter the production of TNF, modulate its signal transduction pathways, or directly inhibit the binding to its receptors. Modulation of a protein-protein interaction with small molecules is an interesting and nontrivial approach. The various strategies used in obtaining small-molecule, nonpeptide, inhibitors of the TNF-TNF receptor interaction through disruption of the TNF trimer or direct inhibition of the TNF-TNF receptor interaction are presented here.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/fmc.12.192DOI Listing
January 2013

Synthetic non-peptide mimetics of alpha-helices.

Chem Soc Rev 2007 Feb 4;36(2):326-34. Epub 2007 Jan 4.

Department of Chemistry, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824, USA.

Proteins in nature fold into native conformations in which combinations of peripherally projected aliphatic, aromatic and ionic functionalities direct a wide range of properties. Alpha-helices, one of the most common protein secondary structures, serve as important recognition regions on protein surfaces for numerous protein-protein, protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions. These interactions are characterized by conserved structural features within the alpha-helical domain. Rational design of structural mimetics of these domains with synthetic small molecules has proven an effective means to modulate such protein functions. In this tutorial review we discuss strategies that utilize synthetic small-molecule antagonists to selectively target essential protein-protein interactions involved in certain diseases. We also evaluate some of the protein-protein interactions that have been or are potential targets for alpha-helix mimetics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/b608043jDOI Listing
February 2007

Synthesis of a 2,3';6',3''-terpyridine scaffold as an alpha-helix mimetic.

Org Lett 2005 Nov;7(24):5405-8

Department of Chemistry, Yale University, P.O. Box 20810, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA.

[reaction: see text] A terpyridine scaffold has been designed as an alpha-helix mimetic. A facile synthesis of the ortho-functionalized 2,3'-oligopyridine has been accomplished using sequential Bohlmann-Rahtz heteroannulation reactions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ol0521228DOI Listing
November 2005