Publications by authors named "Jessica Klima-Frysch"

4 Publications

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A scientometric analysis of neuroblastoma research.

BMC Cancer 2020 May 29;20(1):486. Epub 2020 May 29.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Background: Thousands of research articles on neuroblastoma have been published over the past few decades; however, the heterogeneity and variable quality of scholarly data may challenge scientists or clinicians to survey all of the available information. Hence, holistic measurement and analyzation of neuroblastoma-related literature with the help of sophisticated mathematical tools could provide deep insights into global research performance and the collaborative architectonical structure within the neuroblastoma scientific community. In this scientometric study, we aim to determine the extent of the scientific output related to neuroblastoma research between 1980 and 2018.

Methods: We applied novel scientometric tools, including Bibliometrix R package, biblioshiny, VOSviewer, and CiteSpace IV for comprehensive science mapping analysis of extensive bibliographic metadata, which was retrieved from the Web of ScienceTM Core Collection database.

Results: We demonstrate the enormous proliferation of neuroblastoma research during last the 38 years, including 12,435 documents published in 1828 academic journals by 36,908 authors from 86 different countries. These documents received a total of 316,017 citations with an average citation per document of 28.35 ± 7.7. We determine the proportion of highly cited and never cited papers, "occasional" and prolific authors and journals. Further, we show 12 (13.9%) of 86 countries were responsible for 80.4% of neuroblastoma-related research output.

Conclusions: These findings are crucial for researchers, clinicians, journal editors, and others working in neuroblastoma research to understand the strengths and potential gaps in the current literature and to plan future investments in data collection and science policy. This first scientometric study of global neuroblastoma research performance provides valuable insight into the scientific landscape, co-authorship network architecture, international collaboration, and interaction within the neuroblastoma community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-020-06974-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7260742PMC
May 2020

Safety of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell recipients with severe primary immunodeficiency diseases.

PLoS One 2020 15;15(5):e0233016. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs) provide prolonged intravenous access for pediatric patients with severe primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, little is known about the epidemiology and clinical significance of TCVC-related morbidity in this particular patient group. We conducted the retrospective analysis of patients with severe PID who received percutaneous landmark-guided TCVC implantation prior to HSCT. We analyzed 92 consecutive TCVC implantations in 69 patients (median [interquartile range] age 3.0 [0-11] years) with severe combined immune deficiency (n = 39, 42.4%), chronic granulomatous disease (n = 17, 18.4%), and other rare PID syndromes (n = 36, 39.2%). The median length of TCVC observation was 144.1 (85.5-194.6) days with a total of 14,040 catheter days at risk (cdr). The overall rate of adverse events during catheter insertion was 17.4% (n = 16) and 25.0% during catheter dwell period (n = 23, catheter risk [CR] per 1000 cdr = 1.64). The most common complication was TCVC-related infection with an overall prevalence of 9.8% (n = 9, CR = 0.64), followed by late dislocation (n = 6, 6.5%, CR = 0.43), early dislocation (n = 4, 4.3%) and catheter dysfunction (n = 4, 4.3%, CR = 0.28). TCVCs are safe in children with severe PID undergoing HSCT with relatively low rates of TCVC-related infection.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233016PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7228048PMC
August 2020

The outcome of Bishop-Koop procedure compared to divided stoma in neonates with meconium ileus, congenital intestinal atresia and necrotizing enterocolitis.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Jul;98(27):e16304

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

To determine the potential value and suitability of Bishop-Koop procedure (BK) compared to divided stoma (DS) in neonates with meconium ileus (MI), congenital intestinal atresia (CIA), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).A retrospective data collection from 2000 to 2019 on neonates undergoing BK and DS formation and closure for MI, CIA, and NEC was conducted. Ostomy related complications following both procedures were analyzed.One hundred two consecutive patients managed with a BK (n = 57, 55.8%) and DS (n = 45, 44.2%) for MI (n = 38, 37.2%), CIA (n = 31, 30.5%), and NEC (n = 33, 32.3%) were analyzed. Mean operating time for ostomy creation did not differ significantly between BK and DS groups (156 ± 54 vs 135 ± 66.8 min, P = .08). The prevalence of stoma-related complications following BK and DS formation was 8.7% and 31.1%, respectively (P = .005). The complication rate after BK and DS closure was 3.5% and 6.7%, respectively (P = .65). The operating time for ostomy reversal and length of hospital stay after stoma closure were significantly shorter in BK group (82.2 ± 51.4 vs 183 ± 84.5 min and 5.5 ± 2.7 vs 11.3 ± 3.9 days, P < .001).BK procedure is safe, reliable, and suitable technique in neonatal surgery with low complications rate following ostomy creation as well as shorter operating time and length of hospital stay after ostomy closure compared to DS ostomies. Surgeons should keep this technique as an alternative approach in their repertoire.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000016304DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6635230PMC
July 2019

Outcome of landmark-guided percutaneously inserted tunneled central venous catheters in infants and children under 3 years with cancer.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 10 26;65(10):e27295. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Background: There is a paucity of information on procedural and long-term outcomes of tunneled central venous catheters (TCVC) in infants and children younger than 3 years undergoing anticancer therapy. This study aims to evaluate the success, safety, and complications leading to surgical revision or premature removal of TCVC in this particular patient group.

Methods: The clinical course of pediatric patients with percutaneous inserted TCVC, including Groshong (GC) and Hickman/Broviac (HB) catheters, has been analyzed retrospectively. The data analysis includes patient and device characteristics, adverse events during insertion, and dwell period complications.

Results: A consecutive series of 238 children undergoing implantation of 273 TCVC, including 148 (54.2%) GC and 125 (45.8%) HB catheters, with a total of 38,209 catheter days at risk (cdr) were reviewed. The patient cohort consisted of 65 (23.8%) infants, 77 (28.2%) children aged 1-2 years, and 131 (48.0%) aged 2-3 years. The overall rate of adverse events during catheter insertion was 12.8% (n = 35) with no differences between age groups or devices. The overall rate of long-term complication was 28.2% (n = 77, catheter risk [CR] per 1,000 cdr = 1.75), with the highest prevalence in infants (P = 0.01). The most common complication was late dislocation (n = 24, 8.8%, CR = 0.47), followed by early dislocation (n = 20, 7.3%) and infection (n = 18, 7.4%, CR = 0.42).

Conclusion: Percutaneous landmark-guided insertion of TCVC in neonates and small children with cancer is safe. Patterns of long-term complications are different from those for older children and should be prevented through appropriate management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27295DOI Listing
October 2018