Publications by authors named "Jessica Dalton-Morgan"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An Optimized Transient Dual Luciferase Assay for Quantifying MicroRNA Directed Repression of Targeted Sequences.

Front Plant Sci 2017 20;8:1631. Epub 2017 Sep 20.

Nexgen Plants Pty Ltd., School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, BrisbaneQLD, Australia.

Studies investigating the action of small RNAs on computationally predicted target genes require some form of experimental validation. Classical molecular methods of validating microRNA action on target genes are laborious, while approaches that tag predicted target sequences to qualitative reporter genes encounter technical limitations. The aim of this study was to address the challenge of experimentally validating large numbers of computationally predicted microRNA-target transcript interactions using an optimized, quantitative, cost-effective, and scalable approach. The presented method combines transient expression via agroinfiltration of leaves with a quantitative dual luciferase reporter system, where firefly luciferase is used to report the microRNA-target sequence interaction and Renilla luciferase is used as an internal standard to normalize expression between replicates. We report the appropriate concentration of leaf extracts and dilution factor to apply in order to avoid inhibition of firefly LUC activity. Furthermore, the optimal ratio of microRNA precursor expression construct to reporter construct and duration of the incubation period post-agroinfiltration were determined. The optimized dual luciferase assay provides an efficient, repeatable and scalable method to validate and quantify microRNA action on predicted target sequences. The optimized assay was used to validate five predicted targets of rice microRNA miR529b, with as few as six technical replicates. The assay can be extended to assess other small RNA-target sequence interactions, including assessing the functionality of an artificial miRNA or an RNAi construct on a targeted sequence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2017.01631DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5611435PMC
September 2017

Complete Nucleotide Sequence of an Australian Isolate of Turnip mosaic virus before and after Seven Years of Serial Passaging.

Genome Announc 2016 Nov 17;4(6). Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Nexgen Plants Pty. Ltd. and School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

The complete genome sequence of an Australian isolate of Turnip mosaic virus was determined by Sanger sequencing. After seven years of serial passaging by mechanical inoculation, the isolate was resequenced by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified between the isolates. Both isolates had 96% identity to isolate AUST10.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.01269-16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5114374PMC
November 2016

Genome wide analysis of flowering time trait in multiple environments via high-throughput genotyping technique in Brassica napus L.

PLoS One 2015 19;10(3):e0119425. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.

The prediction of the flowering time (FT) trait in Brassica napus based on genome-wide markers and the detection of underlying genetic factors is important not only for oilseed producers around the world but also for the other crop industry in the rotation system in China. In previous studies the low density and mixture of biomarkers used obstructed genomic selection in B. napus and comprehensive mapping of FT related loci. In this study, a high-density genome-wide SNP set was genotyped from a double-haploid population of B. napus. We first performed genomic prediction of FT traits in B. napus using SNPs across the genome under ten environments of three geographic regions via eight existing genomic predictive models. The results showed that all the models achieved comparably high accuracies, verifying the feasibility of genomic prediction in B. napus. Next, we performed a large-scale mapping of FT related loci among three regions, and found 437 associated SNPs, some of which represented known FT genes, such as AP1 and PHYE. The genes tagged by the associated SNPs were enriched in biological processes involved in the formation of flowers. Epistasis analysis showed that significant interactions were found between detected loci, even among some known FT related genes. All the results showed that our large scale and high-density genotype data are of great practical and scientific values for B. napus. To our best knowledge, this is the first evaluation of genomic selection models in B. napus based on a high-density SNP dataset and large-scale mapping of FT loci.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0119425PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4366152PMC
February 2016

High-throughput genotyping for species identification and diversity assessment in germplasm collections.

Mol Ecol Resour 2015 Sep 21;15(5):1091-101. Epub 2015 Feb 21.

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia.

Germplasm collections provide an extremely valuable resource for breeders and researchers. However, misclassification of accessions by species often hinders the effective use of these collections. We propose that use of high-throughput genotyping tools can provide a fast, efficient and cost-effective way of confirming species in germplasm collections, as well as providing valuable genetic diversity data. We genotyped 180 Brassicaceae samples sourced from the Australian Grains Genebank across the recently released Illumina Infinium Brassica 60K SNP array. Of these, 76 were provided on the basis of suspected misclassification and another 104 were sourced independently from the germplasm collection. Presence of the A- and C-genomes combined with principle components analysis clearly separated Brassica rapa, B. oleracea, B. napus, B. carinata and B. juncea samples into distinct species groups. Several lines were further validated using chromosome counts. Overall, 18% of samples (32/180) were misclassified on the basis of species. Within these 180 samples, 23/76 (30%) supplied on the basis of suspected misclassification were misclassified, and 9/105 (9%) of the samples randomly sourced from the Australian Grains Genebank were misclassified. Surprisingly, several individuals were also found to be the product of interspecific hybridization events. The SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) array proved effective at confirming species, and provided useful information related to genetic diversity. As similar genomic resources become available for different crops, high-throughput molecular genotyping will offer an efficient and cost-effective method to screen germplasm collections worldwide, facilitating more effective use of these valuable resources by breeders and researchers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1755-0998.12379DOI Listing
September 2015

Molecular marker applications in plants.

Methods Mol Biol 2015 ;1245:13-27

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Individuals within a population of a sexually reproducing species will have some degree of heritable genomic variation caused by mutations, insertion/deletions (INDELS), inversions, duplications, and translocations. Such variation can be detected and screened using molecular, or genetic, markers. By definition, molecular markers are genetic loci that can be easily tracked and quantified in a population and may be associated with a particular gene or trait of interest. This chapter will review the current major applications of molecular markers in plants.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1966-6_2DOI Listing
June 2015

Advances in plant genotyping: where the future will take us.

Methods Mol Biol 2015 ;1245:1-11

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Genetic diversity between individuals can be tracked and monitored using a range of molecular markers. These markers can detect variation ranging in scale from a single base pair up to duplications and translocations of entire chromosomal regions. The genotyping of individuals allows the detection of this variation and it has been successfully applied in plant science for many years. The increasing amounts of sequence data able to be generated using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have produced a vast expansion in the rate of discovery of polymorphisms, with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predominating as the marker of choice. This increase in polymorphic marker resources through efficient discovery, coupled with the utility of SNPs, has enabled the shift to high-throughput genotyping assays and these methods are reviewed and discussed here, alongside the recent innovations allowing increased throughput.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1966-6_1DOI Listing
June 2015

A high-throughput SNP array in the amphidiploid species Brassica napus shows diversity in resistance genes.

Funct Integr Genomics 2014 Dec 22;14(4):643-55. Epub 2014 Aug 22.

Centre for Integrative Legume Research and School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)are molecular markers based on nucleotide variation and can be used for genotyping assays across populations and to track genomic inheritance. SNPs offer a comprehensive genotyping alternative to whole-genome sequencing for both agricultural and research purposes including molecular breeding and diagnostics, genome evolution and genetic diversity analyses, genetic mapping, and trait association studies. Here genomic SNPs were discovered between four cultivars of the important amphidiploid oilseed species Brassica napus and used to develop a B. napus Infinium™ array containing 5,306 SNPs randomly dispersed across the genome. Assay success was high, with >94 % of these producing a reproducible, polymorphic genotype in the 1,070 samples screened. Although the assay was designed to B. napus, successful SNP amplification was achieved in the B. napus progenitor species, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and to a lesser extent in the related species Brassica nigra. Phylogenetic analysis was consistent with the expected relationships between B. napus individuals. This study presents an efficient custom SNP assay development pipeline in the complex polyploid Brassica genome and demonstrates the utility of the array for high-throughput genotyping in a number of related Brassica species. It also demonstrates the utility of this assay in genotyping resistance genes on chromosome A7, which segregate amongst the 1,070 samples.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10142-014-0391-2DOI Listing
December 2014

SNP markers-based map construction and genome-wide linkage analysis in Brassica napus.

Plant Biotechnol J 2014 Sep 3;12(7):851-60. Epub 2014 Apr 3.

Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (an alliance between NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Wagga Wagga Agricultural Institute, Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia.

An Illumina Infinium array comprising 5306 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was used to genotype 175 individuals of a doubled haploid population derived from a cross between Skipton and Ag-Spectrum, two Australian cultivars of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). A genetic linkage map based on 613 SNP and 228 non-SNP (DArT, SSR, SRAP and candidate gene markers) covering 2514.8 cM was constructed and further utilized to identify loci associated with flowering time and resistance to blackleg, a disease caused by the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans. Comparison between genetic map positions of SNP markers and the sequenced Brassica rapa (A) and Brassica oleracea (C) genome scaffolds showed several genomic rearrangements in the B. napus genome. A major locus controlling resistance to L. maculans was identified at both seedling and adult plant stages on chromosome A07. QTL analyses revealed that up to 40.2% of genetic variation for flowering time was accounted for by loci having quantitative effects. Comparative mapping showed Arabidopsis and Brassica flowering genes such as Phytochrome A/D, Flowering Locus C and agamous-Like MADS box gene AGL1 map within marker intervals associated with flowering time in a DH population from Skipton/Ag-Spectrum. Genomic regions associated with flowering time and resistance to L. maculans had several SNP markers mapped within 10 cM. Our results suggest that SNP markers will be suitable for various applications such as trait introgression, comparative mapping and high-resolution mapping of loci in B. napus.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pbi.12186DOI Listing
September 2014

The fate of chromosomes and alleles in an allohexaploid Brassica population.

Genetics 2014 May 20;197(1):273-83. Epub 2014 Feb 20.

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences and Centre for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072, Australia.

Production of allohexaploid Brassica (2n = AABBCC) is a promising goal for plant breeders due to the potential for hybrid heterosis and useful allelic contributions from all three of the Brassica genomes present in the cultivated diploid (2n = AA, 2n = BB, 2n = CC) and allotetraploid (2n = AABB, 2n = AACC, and 2n = BBCC) crop species (canola, cabbages, mustards). We used high-throughput SNP molecular marker assays, flow cytometry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize a population of putative allohexaploids derived from self-pollination of a hybrid from the novel cross (B. napus × B. carinata) × B. juncea to investigate whether fertile, stable allohexaploid Brassica can be produced. Allelic segregation in the A and C genomes generally followed Mendelian expectations for an F2 population, with minimal nonhomologous chromosome pairing. However, we detected no strong selection for complete 2n = AABBCC chromosome complements, with weak correlations between DNA content and fertility (r(2) = 0.11) and no correlation between missing chromosomes or chromosome segments and fertility. Investigation of next-generation progeny resulting from one highly fertile F2 plant using FISH revealed general maintenance of high chromosome numbers but severe distortions in karyotype, as evidenced by recombinant chromosomes and putative loss/duplication of A- and C-genome chromosome pairs. Our results show promise for the development of meiotically stable allohexaploid lines, but highlight the necessity of selection for 2n = AABBCC karyotypes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.113.159574DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4012485PMC
May 2014

New technologies for ultrahigh-throughput genotyping in plant taxonomy.

Methods Mol Biol 2014 ;1115:151-75

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Molecular genetic markers represent one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of variation between plant genomes. Molecular marker technology has developed rapidly over the last decade, with the introduction of new DNA sequencing methods and the development of high-throughput genotyping methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) now dominate applications in modern plant genetic analysis. The reducing cost of DNA sequencing and increasing availability of large sequence data sets permit the mining of this data for large numbers of SNPs. These may then be used in applications such as genetic linkage analysis and trait mapping, diversity analysis, association studies, and marker-assisted selection. Here we describe automated methods for the discovery of SNP molecular markers and new technologies for high-throughput, low-cost molecular marker genotyping. Examples include SNP discovery using autoSNPdb and wheatgenome.info as well as SNP genotyping using Illumina's GoldenGate™ and Infinium™ methods.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-767-9_8DOI Listing
August 2014

Identification and characterization of candidate Rlm4 blackleg resistance genes in Brassica napus using next-generation sequencing.

Plant Biotechnol J 2012 Aug 23;10(6):709-15. Epub 2012 Jun 23.

Centre for Integrative Legume Research and School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.

A thorough understanding of the relationships between plants and pathogens is essential if we are to continue to meet the agricultural needs of the world's growing population. The identification of genes underlying important quantitative trait loci is extremely challenging in complex genomes such as Brassica napus (canola, oilseed rape or rapeseed). However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) enable much quicker identification of candidate genes for traits of interest. Here, we demonstrate this with the identification of candidate disease resistance genes from B. napus for its most devastating fungal pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans (blackleg fungus). These two species are locked in an evolutionary arms race whereby a gene-for-gene interaction confers either resistance or susceptibility in the plant depending on the genotype of the plant and pathogen. Preliminary analysis of the complete genome sequence of Brassica rapa, the diploid progenitor of B. napus, identified numerous candidate genes with disease resistance characteristics, several of which were clustered around a region syntenic with a major locus (Rlm4) for blackleg resistance on A7 of B. napus. Molecular analyses of the candidate genes using B. napus NGS data are presented, and the difficulties associated with identifying functional gene copies within the highly duplicated Brassica genome are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7652.2012.00716.xDOI Listing
August 2012
-->