Publications by authors named "Jesús Manuel Cantoral"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rethinking about flor yeast diversity and its dynamic in the "criaderas and soleras" biological aging system.

Food Microbiol 2020 Dec 1;92:103553. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biomedicine, Biotechnology and Public Health, University of Cádiz, Puerto Real, Spain.

Fino wine is one of the most important Sherry wines and it is obtained through a complex and dynamic biological aging system. In this study, wine and veil of flor samples from fifty-two barrels with different aging levels and distributed in three different wineries from the Jerez-Xèrés-Sherry winemaking area have been analyzed during two years. Some of the wine compounds most deeply involved in flor yeast metabolism were analyzed to take into account the blending effect of this system. On the other hand, veil of flor was analyzed by molecular methods, finding five different species: S. cerevisiae, W. anomalus, P. membranaefaciens, P. kudriavzevii and P. manshurica, being the first time that the three last species have been reported in this biological aging system. Since S. cerevisiae was the vast majority of the isolates, its intraspecies variability was also analyzed by the simultaneous amplification of three microsatellite loci, obtaining nine different S. cerevisiae genotypes, also differentiated according to their physiological properties. Biodiversity analysis showed there were significant differences between the three wineries in the three aging scales, although the overall diversity was relatively low. Moreover, variations in the relative frequency of the different S. cerevisiae genotypes were found to be seasonal-dependent.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fm.2020.103553DOI Listing
December 2020

Bacteriophages as an Up-and-Coming Alternative to the Use of Sulfur Dioxide in Winemaking.

Front Microbiol 2019 23;10:2931. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Laboratory of Microbiology, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Department of Biomedicine, Biotechnology and Public Health, University of Cádiz, Cádiz, Spain.

Certain acetic and lactic acid bacteria are major causes of quality defects in musts and wines, giving rise to defects such as a "vinegary," "sharp, like nail polish-remover" taste or preventing alcoholic and/or malolactic fermentation. Sulfur dioxide is the major tool currently used in the control of these bacteria in wine. The aim of this work was to isolate bacteriophages from musts and wine of different grape varieties that were able to eliminate lactic and acetic acid bacteria spoilages at the laboratory scale. Musts obtained from grape-berries of cv. Chardonnay and Moscatel and a red wine made with cv. Tintilla de Rota were used to isolate bacteriophages. Bacteriophages were obtained from each of the musts and the wine and belonged to the order and the family . They were isolated by classical virology methods and identified by electron microscopy. The host bacteria used in the study were lactic acid bacteria of the species , , and and the acetic bacteria . A comparative study was performed by adding phage titrations and SO to musts and wines, which had been previously inoculated with bacteria, to study the effectiveness of bacteriophages against bacteria. The comparative study showed that some bacteriophages were as effective as sulfur dioxide at low concentrations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.02931DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6989489PMC
January 2020

Biodegradation and toxicity reduction of nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by the ascomycetous fungus Thielavia sp HJ22: Identification of fungal metabolites and proposal of a putative pathway.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Mar 21;708:135129. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Laboratory of Biochemistry and Enzymatic Engineering of Lipases, National School of Engineers of Sfax, University of Sfax, BP «1173», 3038 Sfax, Tunisia.

Research on the biodegradation of emerging pollutants is gained great focus regarding their detrimental effects on the environment and humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the ascomycetes Thielavia sp HJ22 to remove the phenolic xenobiotics nonylphenol (NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). The strain showed efficient degradation of NP and 4-tert-OP with 95% and 100% removal within 8 h of incubation, respectively. A removal rate of 80% was observed with 2,4-DCP within the same time. Under experimental conditions, the degradation of the tested pollutants concomitantly increased with the laccase production and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases inhibition. This study showed the involvement of laccase in pollutants removal together with biosorption mechanisms. Additionally, results demonstrated the participation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in the elimination of 2,4-DCP. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed several intermediates, mainly hydroxylated and oxidized compounds with less harmful effects compared to the parent compounds. A decrease in the toxicity of the identified metabolites was observed using Aliivibrio fischeri as bioindicator. The metabolic pathways of degradation were proposed based on the identified metabolites. The results point out the potential of Thielavia strains in the degradation and detoxification of phenolic xenobiotics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.135129DOI Listing
March 2020

Rapid and not culture-dependent assay based on multiplex PCR-SSR analysis for monitoring inoculated yeast strains in industrial wine fermentations.

Arch Microbiol 2017 Jan 8;199(1):135-143. Epub 2016 Sep 8.

Laboratorio de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Wine industry needs a simple method for rapid diagnosis of the dominance of inoculated strains that could be performed routinely during the fermentation process. We present a suitable, high-throughput, and low-cost method to monitor rapidly the dominance of inoculated yeast strains in industrial fermentations of red and white wines using an activated carbon cleaning pretreatment, and a rapid DNA extraction method plus multiplex PCR-SSR analysis. We apply this technique directly to samples of fermenting wines without previously isolating yeast colonies. Results are obtained in a maximum time of 4.5 h.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-016-1287-4DOI Listing
January 2017

Proteomic profiling of Botrytis cinerea conidial germination.

Arch Microbiol 2015 Mar 21;197(2):117-33. Epub 2014 Aug 21.

Laboratory of Microbiology, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research, CeiA3 International Campus of Excellence in Agrifood, University of Cádiz, Pol. Río San Pedro s/n, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is one of the most relevant plant pathogenic fungi. The first step during its infection process is the germination of the conidia. Here, we report on the first proteome analysis during the germination of B. cinerea conidia, where 204 spots showed significant differences in their accumulation between ungerminated and germinated conidia by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and qPCR. The identified proteins were grouped by gene ontology revealing that the infective tools are mainly preformed inside the ungerminated conidia allowing a quick fungal development at the early stages of conidial germination. From 118 identified spots, several virulence factors have been identified while proteins, such as mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine synthase or uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, have been disclosed as a new potential virulence factors in botrytis whose role in pathogenicity needs to be studied to gain new insights about the role of these proteins as therapeutic targets and virulence factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-014-1029-4DOI Listing
March 2015

Molecular analysis of red wine yeast diversity in the Ribera del Duero D.O. (Spain) area.

Arch Microbiol 2013 May 9;195(5):297-302. Epub 2013 Feb 9.

Laboratorio de Microbiología y Genética, Departamento de Biomedicina, Biotecnología y Salud Pública, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, Polígono del Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Molecular characterization of wine yeast population during spontaneous fermentation in biodynamic wines from Ribera del Duero D.O. located at northern plateau of Spain has been carried out during two consecutive years. A total of 829 yeast strains were isolated from the samples and characterized by electrophoretic karyotype. The results show the presence of three population of yeast differentiated by their electrophoretic karyotypes, (1) non-Saccharomyces yeast dominant in the initial phase of the fermentations (NS); (2) Saccharomyces bayanus var uvarum detected mainly mid-way through the fermentation process at 20-25 °C; and (3) Saccharomyces cerevisiae which remained dominant until the end of the fermentation. This is the first study showing the population dynamic of S. bayanus var. uvarum in red wines produced in Ribera del Duero that could represent an important source of autochthonous wine yeasts with novel oenological properties.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-013-0872-zDOI Listing
May 2013

Using RFLP-mtDNA for the rapid monitoring of the dominant inoculated yeast strain in industrial wine fermentations.

Int J Food Microbiol 2011 Jan 3;145(1):331-5. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Laboratorio de Microbiología y Genética, CASEM, Departamento de Biomedicina, Biotecnología y Salud Pública, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-RFLP) has been applied as a test to monitor the abundance of the starter yeast strain during industrial wine fermentations without previous isolation of yeast colonies. For white wine fermentations, we performed a rapid assay consisting in taking a sample of fermenting must, purifying the DNA from harvested cells, and obtaining the restriction patterns by digestion with the endonuclease HinfI. The same protocol, but adding an overnight cultivation step before DNA purification, was also applied to red wine fermentations. The results were compared with those obtained from the subsequent characterisation of strains, for the same samples, by analysis of the electrophoretic karyotype of isolated yeast colonies. In all cases, when the inoculated strain was dominant within the yeast population, the rapid assay anticipated the result by showing the coincidence between the restriction profiles obtained from both total cells and the inoculated strain. The results were obtained at 11 or 23 h after sampling for white- or red-wine fermentations respectively. This method allows a rapid intervention of the wine-producer if the presence of the inoculated yeasts has suffered a sudden decrease in any phase of the fermentation process.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2010.11.035DOI Listing
January 2011

2-DE proteomic approach to the Botrytis cinerea secretome induced with different carbon sources and plant-based elicitors.

Proteomics 2010 Jun;10(12):2270-80

Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus infecting a number of crops (tomatoes, grapes and strawberries), which has been adopted as a model system in molecular phytopathology. B. cinerea uses a wide variety of infection strategies, which are mediated by a set of genes/proteins called pathogenicity/virulence factors. Many of these factors have been described as secreted proteins, and thus the study of this sub-proteome, the secretome, under changing circumstances can help us to understand the roles of these factors, possibly revealing new loci for the fight against the pathogen. A 2-DE, MALDI TOF/TOF-based approach has been developed to establish the proteins secreted to culture media supplemented with different carbon sources and plant-based elicitors (in this study: glucose, cellulose, starch, pectin and tomato cell walls). Secreted proteins were obtained from the culture media by deoxycholate-trichloroacetic acid/phenol extraction, and 76 spots were identified, yielding 95 positive hits that correspond to 56 unique proteins, including several known virulence factors (i.e. pectin methyl esterases, xylanases and proteases). The observed increases in secretion of proteins with established virulence-related functions indicate that this in vitro-induction/proteome-mining approach is a promising strategy for discovering new pathogenicity factors and dissecting infection mechanisms in a discrete fashion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200900408DOI Listing
June 2010

Proteomic analysis of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea during cellulose degradation.

Proteomics 2009 May;9(10):2892-902

Laboratory of Microbiology, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cádiz, Pol. Río San Pedro s/n, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

The ascomycete Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus infecting and causing significant yield losses in a number of crops. Moreover, in the last few years, B. cinerea has been adopted as an important model system in molecular phytopathology. In spite of these contributions, the molecular basis of the infection cycle remains unclear. Proteomic approaches have revealed significant information about the infective cycle of several pathogens, including B. cinerea. The main aim of this study is to make available a proteomic database containing a significant number of identified proteins from B. cinerea. In brief, three independent B. cinerea cultures supplemented with carboxymethylcellulose were used, and the extracted proteins were independently separated by 2-D PAGE to obtain the proteome map from B. cinerea. Two hundred and sixty-seven spots were selected for MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis, resulting in 303 positive identifications, mostly representing unannotated proteins. Identified proteins were then classified into categories using the PANTHER classification system (www.pantherdb.org), showing the relevance of protein metabolism and modification process and oxidoreductase activity. Since cellulose is one of the major components of the plant cell wall, many of the identified proteins may have a crucial role in the pathogenicity process. In brief, this proteomic map of B. cinerea will be a useful basis for exploring the proteins involved in the infection cycle, which will in turn provide new targets for crop diagnosis and focused fungicide design.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200800540DOI Listing
May 2009

Proteomic analysis of phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea as a potential tool for identifying pathogenicity factors, therapeutic targets and for basic research.

Arch Microbiol 2007 Mar 24;187(3):207-15. Epub 2006 Nov 24.

Laboratory of Microbiology, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cádiz, Pol. Río San Pedro, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus causing disease in a substantial number of economically important crops. In an attempt to identify putative fungal virulence factors, the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) protein profile from two B. cinerea strains differing in virulence and toxin production were compared. Protein extracts from fungal mycelium obtained by tissue homogenization were analyzed. The mycelial 2-DE protein profile revealed the existence of qualitative and quantitative differences between the analyzed strains. The lack of genomic data from B. cinerea required the use of peptide fragmentation data from MALDI-TOF/TOF and ESI ion trap for protein identification, resulting in the identification of 27 protein spots. A significant number of spots were identified as malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The different expression patterns revealed by some of the identified proteins could be ascribed to differences in virulence between strains. Our results indicate that proteomic analysis are becoming an important tool to be used as a starting point for identifying new pathogenicity factors, therapeutic targets and for basic research on this plant pathogen in the postgenomic era.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-006-0188-3DOI Listing
March 2007

Two-dimensional electrophoresis protein profile of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea.

Proteomics 2006 Apr;6 Suppl 1:S88-96

Laboratory of Microbiology, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cádiz, Cádiz, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungi causing disease in a number of important crops. It is considered a very complex species in which different populations seem to be adapted to different hosts. In order to characterize fungal virulence factors, a proteomic research was started. A protocol for protein extraction from mycelium tissue, with protein separation by 2-DE and MS analysis, was optimised as a first approach to defining the B. cinerea proteome. Around 400 spots were detected in 2-DE CBB-stained gels, covering the 5.4-7.7 pH and 14-85 kDa ranges. The averages of analytical and biological coefficients of variance for 64 independent spots were 16.1% and 37.5%, respectively. Twenty-two protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF or ESI IT MS/MS, with some of them corresponding to forms of malate dehydrogenase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Two more spots matched a cyclophilin and a protein with an unknown function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200500436DOI Listing
April 2006