Publications by authors named "Jesús M Cantoral"

14 Publications

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Culturable Yeasts as Biofertilizers and Biopesticides for a Sustainable Agriculture: A Comprehensive Review.

Plants (Basel) 2021 Apr 21;10(5). Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Laboratory of Microbiology, Department Biomedicine, Biotechnology and Public Health, University of Cádiz, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz, Spain.

The extensive use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides has negative consequences in terms of soil microbial biodiversity and environmental contamination. Faced with this growing concern, a proposed alternative agricultural method is the use of microorganisms as biofertilizers. Many works have been focused on bacteria, but the limited literature on yeasts and their potential ability to safely promote plant growth is gaining particular attention in recent years. Thus, the objective of this review is to highlight the application of yeasts as biological agents in different sectors of sustainable agricultural practices through direct or indirect mechanisms of action. Direct mechanisms include the ability of yeasts to provide soluble nutrients to plants, produce organic acids and phytohormones (indole-3-acetic acid). Indirect mechanisms involve the ability for yeasts to act as biocontrol agents through their high antifungal activity and lower insecticidal and herbicidal activity, and as soil bioremediating agents. They also act as protective agents against extreme environmental factors by activating defense mechanisms. It is evident that all the aspects that yeasts offer could be useful in the creation of quality biofertilizers and biopesticides. Hence, extensive research on yeasts could be promising and potentially provide an environmentally friendly solution to the increased crop production that will be required with a growing population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants10050822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8142971PMC
April 2021

Ormosils loaded with SiO nanoparticles functionalized with Ag as multifunctional superhydrophobic/biocidal/consolidant treatments for buildings conservation.

Nanotechnology 2019 Aug 8;30(34):345701. Epub 2019 May 8.

TEP-243 Nanomaterials Group. Department of Physical-Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Cadiz, E-11510 Puerto Real, Spain.

The alarming increase of pollution has significantly increased buildings maintenance. Nowadays, the economic figures associated to repairing activities are even more relevant than those corresponding to new construction works, especially on heritage buildings. Since the degradation of building materials is the result of a complex combination of physical, chemical and biological agents, the development of multifunctional protective treatments remains a significant challenge. We report a simple strategy to produce a versatile biocidal/superhydrophobic/consolidant treatment by incorporating biocidal Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) grafted to functionalized SiONPs into a silica sol, which can be applied by simple procedures such as spraying. The use of an Ag-SiO coupling agent increases biocidal effectiveness up to >90% values due to: (1) an increase of the AgNPs stability; (2) a hierarchical roughness due to the formation of Ag/SiONPs clusters; and (3) an enhanced contact with the cell walls. In addition, the synergistic effect allows for an easier removal of the dead cells, increasing the durability of the treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/ab1ff0DOI Listing
August 2019

Wild Grape-Associated Yeasts as Promising Biocontrol Agents against Fungal Pathogens.

Front Microbiol 2017 3;8:2025. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

The increasing level of hazardous residues in the environment and food chains has led the European Union to restrict the use of chemical fungicides. Thus, exploiting new natural antagonistic microorganisms against fungal diseases could serve the agricultural production to reduce pre- and post-harvest losses, to boost safer practices for workers and to protect the consumers' health. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the antagonistic potential of epiphytic yeasts against , and pathogen species. In particular, yeast isolation was carried out from grape berries of ssp sylvestris populations, of the Eurasian area, and ssp cultivars from three different farming systems (organic, biodynamic, and conventional). Strains able to inhibit or slow the growth of pathogens were selected by and experiments. The most effective antagonist yeast strains were subsequently assayed for their capability to colonize the grape berries. Finally, possible modes of action, such as nutrients and space competition, iron depletion, cell wall degrading enzymes, diffusible and volatile antimicrobial compounds, and biofilm formation, were investigated as well. Two hundred and thirty-one yeast strains belonging to 26 different species were isolated; 20 of them, ascribed to eight species, showed antagonistic action against all molds. Yeasts isolated from ssp sylvestris were more effective (up to 50%) against rather than those isolated from ssp vinifera. Six strains, all isolated from wild vines, belonging to four species (, and ) revealed one or more phenotypical characteristics associated to the analyzed modes of antagonistic action.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.02025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5675894PMC
November 2017

Phenotypic Effects and Inhibition of Botrydial Biosynthesis Induced by Different Plant-Based Elicitors in Botrytis cinerea.

Curr Microbiol 2018 Apr 17;75(4):431-440. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Microbiology Laboratory, Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, Polígono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is considered a model organism for the study of plant-pathogen interaction showing great genetic diversity and a high degree of morphological variability depending on environmental conditions. The use of new compounds and plant-based elicitors may trigger the expression of different B. cinerea genes, providing new sources of virulence factors. This work is focused on elucidating the phenotypic effect in B. cinerea of different carbon sources such as glucose, cellulose and tomato cell walls (TCW). Production of botrydial and dihydrobotrydial toxins was evaluated using thin-layer chromatography (TLC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-NMR) and mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRESIMS). Expression of the toxin biosynthesis gene BcBOT2 was followed using RT-qPCR. Results show an inhibition of the toxin biosynthesis pathway when TCW are present as a sole carbon source, suggesting that the toxin is only produced when rich molecules, like glucose, are available for fungal metabolism. That suggests a connection between gene expression of virulence factors and environmental conditions, where the silent genes can be induced by different culture conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-017-1399-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5842495PMC
April 2018

Dataset of the phosphoproteome induced by different plant-based elicitors.

Data Brief 2016 Jun 22;7:1447-1450. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research, CeiA3, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz, Spain.

Phosphorylation is one of the main post-translational modification (PTM) involved in signaling network in the ascomycete , one of the most relevant phytopathogenic fungus. The data presented in this article provided a differential mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome of under two different phenotypical conditions induced by the use of two different elicitors: glucose and deproteinized Tomate Cell Walls (TCW). A total 1138 and 733 phosphoproteins were identified for glucose and TCW culture conditions respectively. Raw data are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier (PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD003099). Further interpretation and discussion of these data are provided in our research article entitled "Phosphoproteome analysis of in response to different plant-based elicitors" (Liñeiro et al., 2016) [1].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2016.04.039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5063813PMC
June 2016

The F-actin capping protein is required for hyphal growth and full virulence but is dispensable for septum formation in Botrytis cinerea.

Fungal Biol 2016 10 22;120(10):1225-35. Epub 2016 Jul 22.

Institut für Biologie und Biotechnologie der Pflanzen (IBBP), Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Schlossplatz 8, 48143 Münster, Germany. Electronic address:

Filamentous (F-) actin is an integral part of the cytoskeleton allowing for cell growth, intracellular motility, and cytokinesis of eukaryotic cells. Its assembly from G-actin monomers and its disassembly are tightly regulated processes involving a number of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) such as F-actin nucleators and cross-linking proteins. F-actin capping protein (CP) is an alpha/beta heterodimer known from yeast and higher eukaryotes to bind to the fast growing ends of the actin filaments stabilizing them. In this study, we identified the orthologs of the two CP subunits, named BcCPA1 and BcCPB1, in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and showed that the two proteins physically interact in a yeast two-hybrid approach. GFP-BcCPA1 fusion proteins were functional and localized to the assumed sites of F-actin accumulation, i.e. to the hyphal tips and the sites of actin ring formation. Deletion of bccpa1 had a profound effect on hyphal growth, morphogenesis, and virulence indicating the importance of F-actin capping for an intact actin cytoskeleton. As polarized growth - unlike septum formation - is impaired in the mutants, it can be concluded that the organization and/or localization of actin patches and cables are disturbed rather than the functionality of the actin rings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2016.07.007DOI Listing
October 2016

Modifications of fungal membrane proteins profile under pathogenicity induction: A proteomic analysis of Botrytis cinerea membranome.

Proteomics 2016 09 5;16(17):2363-76. Epub 2016 Aug 5.

Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research (IVAGRO), CeiA3, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is a model fungus for the study of phytopathogenicity that exhibits a wide arsenal of tools to infect plant tissues. Most of these factors are related to signal transduction cascades, in which membrane proteins play a key role as a bridge between environment and intracellular molecular processes. This work describes the first description of the membranome of Botrytis under different pathogenicity conditions induced by different plant-based elicitors: glucose and tomato cell wall (TCW). A discovery proteomics analysis of membrane proteins was carried out by mass spectrometry. A total of 2794 proteins were successfully identified, 46% of them were classified as membrane proteins based on the presence of transmembrane regions and lipidation. Further analyses showed significant differences in the membranome composition depending on the available carbon source: 804 proteins were exclusively identified when the fungus was cultured with glucose as a sole carbon source, and 251 proteins were exclusively identified with TCW. Besides, among the 1737 common proteins, a subset of 898 proteins presented clear differences in their abundance. GO enrichment and clustering interaction analysis revealed changes in the composition of membranome with increase of signalling function in glucose conditions and carbohydrate degradation process in TCW conditions. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003099 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD003099).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.201500496DOI Listing
September 2016

Phosphoproteome analysis of B. cinerea in response to different plant-based elicitors.

J Proteomics 2016 Apr 18;139:84-94. Epub 2016 Mar 18.

Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research, CeiA3, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz, Spain. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: The phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea is a ubiquitous fungus with a high capacity to adapt its metabolism to different hosts and environmental conditions in order to deploy a variety of virulence and pathogenicity factors and develop a successful plant infection. Here we report the first comparative phosphoproteomic study of B. cinerea, aimed to analyze the phosphoprotein composition of the fungus and its changes under different phenotypical conditions induced by two different carbon sources as plant based elicitors: glucose and deproteinized tomato cell wall (TCW). A total of 2854 and 2269 different phosphosites (2883 and 1137 phosphopeptides) were identified in glucose and TCW respectively, which map to 1338 phosphoproteins in glucose and 733 in TCW. Out of the identified phosphoproteins, 173 were exclusively found when glucose was the only carbon source and 11 when the carbon source was TCW. Differences in the pattern of phosphorylation-sites were also detected according to the carbon source. Gene ontology classification of the identified phosphoproteins showed that most of the characteristic proteins of the different carbon sources were related to signalling and transmembrane transport, thus highlighting the importance of these processes in the fungal adaptation to the surrounding conditions.

Biological Significance: The characterization of the B. cinerea phosphoproteome under different induction conditions reported here is the first comparative phosphoproteomic approach in this model phytopathogenic fungus. The identified phosphopeptides contribute to expand the map of known phosphoproteins in this pathogen and the observed changes according to the used carbon source contribute to understand the adaptation of the fungus to the environment changes. This knowledge improves the understanding of the adaptation mechanism, defines the role of the phosphoproteins involved in this process, and enables the advance in the design of novel strategies against the fungi.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.03.019DOI Listing
April 2016

Analysis of temperature-mediated changes in the wine yeast Saccharomyces bayanus var uvarum. An oenological study of how the protein content influences wine quality.

Proteomics 2016 Feb 25;16(4):576-92. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research, CeIA3, Marine and Environmental Sciences Faculty, University of Cadiz, Cádiz, Spain.

Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum plays an important role in the fermentation of red wine from the D.O. Ribera del Duero. This is due to the special organoleptic taste that this yeast gives the wines and their ability to ferment at low temperature. To determine the molecular factors involved in the fermentation process at low temperature, a differential proteomic approach was performed by using 2D-DIGE, comparing, qualitatively and quantitatively, the profiles obtained at 13 and 25°C. A total of 152 protein spots were identified. We detected proteins upregulated at 13°C that were shown to be related to temperature stress, the production of aromatic compounds involved in the metabolism of amino acids, and the production of fusel alcohols and their derivatives, each of which is directly related to the quality of the wines. To check the temperature effects, an aromatic analysis by GC-MS was performed. The proteomic and "aromatomic" results are discussed in relation to the oenological properties of S. bayanus var. uvarum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.201500137DOI Listing
February 2016

Acetyltransferase SAS2 and sirtuin SIR2, respectively, control flocculation and biofilm formation in wine yeast.

FEMS Yeast Res 2014 Sep 26;14(6):845-57. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Laboratorio de MicrobiologÍa Enológica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Cell-to-cell and cell-to-environment interactions of microorganisms are of substantial relevance for their biotechnological use. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, flocculation can be an advantage to clarify final liquid products after fermentation, and biofilm formation may be relevant for the encapsulation of strains of interest. The adhesion properties of wine yeast strains can be modified by the genetic manipulation of transcriptional regulatory proteins, such as histone deacetylases, and acetylases. Sirtuin SIR2 is essential for the formation of mat structures, a kind of biofilm that requires the expression of cell-wall protein FLO11 as its deletion reduces FLO11 expression, and adhesion of cells to themselves and to agar in a commercial wine strain. Deletion of acetyltransferase GCN5 leads to a similar phenotype. A naturally flocculant wine yeast strain called P2 was characterized. Its flocculation happens only during grape juice fermentation and is due to the presence of a highly transcribed version of flocculin FLO5, linked to the presence of a δ sequence in the promoter. Deletion of acetyltransferase SAS2 enhances this phenotype and maltose fermentation even more. Therefore, the manipulation of acetylation/deacetylation machinery members is a valid way to alter the interaction of industrial yeast to their environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1567-1364.12173DOI Listing
September 2014

Proteomic analysis of conidia germination in Colletotrichum acutatum.

Arch Microbiol 2013 Apr 1;195(4):227-46. Epub 2013 Feb 1.

Microbiology Laboratory, Wine and Grapewine Research Institute, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cádiz, Pol. Río San Pedro s/n, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz, Spain.

Colletotrichum acutatum is an important phytopathogenic fungus causing anthracnose in commercially important fruit crops, such as strawberry. The conidia produced by the fungus are survival structures which play a key role in host infection and fungal propagation. Despite its relevance to the fungal life cycle, conidial biology has not been extensively investigated. Here, we provide the first proteomic description of the conidial germination in C. acutatum by comparing the proteomic profiles of ungerminated and germinated conidia. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, we have identified 365 proteins in 354 spots, which represent 245 unique proteins, including some proteins with key functions in pathogenesis. All these proteins have been classified according to their molecular function and their involvement in biological processes, including cellular energy production, oxidative metabolism, stress, fatty acid synthesis, protein synthesis, and folding. This report constitutes the first comprehensive study of protein expression during the early stage of the C. acutatum conidial germination. It advances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the conidial germination process, and provides a useful basis for the further characterization of proteins involved in fungal biology and fungus life cycles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-013-0871-0DOI Listing
April 2013

Development of proteomics-based fungicides: new strategies for environmentally friendly control of fungal plant diseases.

Int J Mol Sci 2011 Jan 21;12(1):795-816. Epub 2011 Jan 21.

Laboratory of Microbiology, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cádiz, Pol. Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Spain.

Proteomics has become one of the most relevant high-throughput technologies. Several approaches have been used for studying, for example, tumor development, biomarker discovery, or microbiology. In this "post-genomic" era, the relevance of these studies has been highlighted as the phenotypes determined by the proteins and not by the genotypes encoding them that is responsible for the final phenotypes. One of the most interesting outcomes of these technologies is the design of new drugs, due to the discovery of new disease factors that may be candidates for new therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, no commercial fungicides have been developed from targeted molecular research, this review will shed some light on future prospects. We will summarize previous research efforts and discuss future innovations, focused on the fight against one of the main agents causing a devastating crops disease, fungal phytopathogens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms12010795DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039980PMC
January 2011

Btn2p is involved in ethanol tolerance and biofilm formation in flor yeast.

FEMS Yeast Res 2008 Nov 12;8(7):1127-36. Epub 2008 Jun 12.

Department of Biotechnology, IATA (CSIC), Paterna, Valencia, Spain.

Flor yeasts are a particular kind of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains involved in Sherry wine biological ageing. During this process, yeasts form a film on the wine surface and use ethanol as a carbon source, producing acetaldehyde as a by-product. Acetaldehyde induces BTN2 transcription in laboratory strains. Btn2p is involved in the control of the subcellular localization of different proteins. The BTN2 gene shows a complex expression pattern in wine yeast, increasing its expression by acetaldehyde, but repressing it by ethanol. A flor yeast strain transcribes more BTN2 than a first fermentation yeast during growth, but less under different stress conditions. BTN2 deletion decreases flor yeast resistance to high ethanol concentrations. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed by the addition of high amounts of amino acids to the growth medium, indicating that the role of Btn2p protein in amino acid transport is important for ethanol resistance. Btn2p deletion increases the fermentative capacity of flor yeast and its overexpression prevents its growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. BTN2 deletion also affects the biofilm formation ability of flor yeast, and it increases its sliding motility, resulting in increased mat formation. This correlates with an increased transcription of the FLO11 gene, a gene essential for biofilm formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1567-1364.2008.00397.xDOI Listing
November 2008

Genome-wide amplifications caused by chromosomal rearrangements play a major role in the adaptive evolution of natural yeast.

Genetics 2003 Dec;165(4):1745-59

Laboratorio de Microbiología y Genética, CASEM, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

The relative importance of gross chromosomal rearrangements to adaptive evolution has not been precisely defined. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strains offer significant advantages for the study of molecular evolution since they have recently evolved to a high degree of specialization in a very restrictive environment. Using DNA microarray technology, we have compared the genomes of two prominent variants of S. cerevisiae flor yeast strains. The strains differ from one another in the DNA copy number of 116 genomic regions that comprise 38% of the genome. In most cases, these regions are amplicons flanked by repeated sequences or other recombination hotspots previously described as regions where double-strand breaks occur. The presence of genes that confer specific characteristics to the flor yeast within the amplicons supports the role of chromosomal rearrangements as a major mechanism of adaptive evolution in S. cerevisiae. We propose that nonallelic interactions are enhanced by ethanol- and acetaldehyde-induced double-strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA, which are repaired by pathways that yield gross chromosomal rearrangements. This mechanism of chromosomal evolution could also account for the sexual isolation shown among the flor yeast.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1462916PMC
December 2003